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It seems we cannot call type conversion operator easily in C# generic class. Here is the code. Why?

T006 finally archive our target.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Linq;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class vec<T, T2> : List<T> where T : class
    {
        public vec(IEnumerable<T2> other)
        {
            //Converter<T2, T> cvt = (v) => (T)v; // T004 failed, try defined function dynamicly, cannot compile, too.

            // T006 pass, client happy, we not happy, but anyway passed, performance may not happy.
            var conversionOperator = typeof(T).GetMethods(BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public)
                                    .Where(m => m.Name == "op_Explicit" || m.Name == "op_Implicit")
                                    .Where(m => m.ReturnType == typeof(T))
                                    .Where(m => m.GetParameters().Length == 1 && m.GetParameters()[0].ParameterType == typeof(T2))
                                    .FirstOrDefault();
            Func<T2, T> cvt = (obj) =>
            {
                if (conversionOperator != null)
                    return (T)conversionOperator.Invoke(null, new object[] { obj });
                else
                    return default(T);
            };

            foreach (T2 item in other)
            {
                //Add((T)item);         // T001 failed, this line cannot compile
                //Add(item as T);       // T002 failed, this line alwasy return null. //  http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/cscsdfbt.aspx
                //Add((T)(object)item); // T003 failed, pass compile, but throw exception at runtime.
                Add(cvt(item));         // T006 pass.
            }
        }

        // T005 pass, but clients for this code will not happy.
        public vec(Converter<T2, T> cvt, IEnumerable<T2> other)
        {
            foreach (T2 item in other)
            {
                Add(cvt(item));
            }

        }
    }

    class XXX
    {
        public int foo = 22;
        static public explicit operator XXX(YYY other)
        {
            XXX me = new XXX();
            me.foo = (int)other.foo;
            return me;
        }
    }

    class YYY
    {
        public float foo = 11;
    }



    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            YYY[] from = new YYY[2];
            for (int i = 0; i < from.Length; i++)
            {
                from[i] = new YYY();
            }

            XXX x = (XXX)from[0];

            vec<XXX, YYY> coll = new vec<XXX, YYY>(from);

            // Not happy, this requires user have strong C# skill;
            //vec<XXX, YYY> coll = new vec<XXX, YYY>((v) => (XXX)v, from);

            foreach (var item in coll)
            {
                Debug.Print("Value is {0}", item.foo);
            }

        }
    }

}

The compiler error for T001 is: Cannot convert type 'T2' to 'T'

share|improve this question
2  
You can't simply cast a class object to an object of another class... you have to create a method to convert it properly: Take a look here: stackoverflow.com/questions/988658/… –  Janes Abou Chleih May 6 '13 at 9:36
    
I already define many T2->T type conversion operator, I'm afraid T2->object->T cast will not call my conversion operator. Anyway, I will try. –  Raymond May 6 '13 at 9:46
    
This really, really depends on the context. Why would you want to convert T2 to T? –  antonijn May 6 '13 at 9:48
    
I am writing a quick type mapping between two systems. Every basic type is now 'type conversion operator' OK. But for collection types, I've to type them again and again, the only difference is conversion call in collection type mapping... System.Converter<> seems very ugly in my code, and I have to pass them to constructor. All System.Converter<> parameter is just a anonymous delegate call to my type conversion expression. private vecT1(T2collection other) : base((v) => (T2) v, other) {} –  Raymond May 6 '13 at 9:57
    
I think my this question is same as this one [C# virtual static method][1] [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/1243836/… –  Raymond May 6 '13 at 15:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you need to have your custom implicit/explicit conversion operators run, then casting to/from object (or performing an as cast) will skip them because the information is only known at compile-time when you are performing a runtime cast.

The only way I know of, through a general-use generic method such as you posted, is to leverage dynamic which will lookup at runtime to see if there are any conversion operators defined and call them:

return (T2)(dynamic)obj;

Quick example:

public class Class1
{

    public static implicit operator Class1(Class2 class2)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("implicit conversion from Class2 to Class1");
        return new Class1();
    }

    public static implicit operator Class2(Class1 class1)
    {
    Console.WriteLine("implicit conversion from Class1 to Class2");
        return new Class2();
    }
}

public class Class2
{

}

public static T2 Convert<T1, T2>(T1 obj)
{
    return (T2)(dynamic)obj;
}

var class1 = new Class1();
var class2 = Convert<Class1, Class2>(class1);
//outputs: implicit conversion from Class1 to Class2

Be aware though, that this using reflection and doing significant work at runtime, so thoroughly test and make sure performance is still acceptable.

EDIT: Since you do not have access to the dynamic language runtime, you can write your own conversion operator lookups with reflection:

public static T2 Convert<T1, T2>(T1 obj)
{
    var conversionOperator = typeof(T1).GetMethods(BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public)
    .Where(m => m.Name == "op_Explicit" || m.Name == "op_Implicit")
    .Where(m => m.ReturnType == typeof(T2))
    .Where(m => m.GetParameters().Length == 1 && m.GetParameters()[0].ParameterType == typeof(T1))
    .FirstOrDefault();

    if (conversionOperator != null)
        return (T2)conversionOperator.Invoke(null, new object[]{obj});

    throw new Exception("No conversion operator found");
}

You may need to tweak the code (perhaps to attempt traditional casting if no operators are found), and I'm not sure if I can guarantee that this will work every time. I don't know if there are corner cases or platform quirks to handle. Not to mention that this will be pretty slow with the reflection. You could introduce a quick caching mechanism where you do an O(1) lookup with a Dictionary or something where you can store each conversion operator as they're found for each type combination.

share|improve this answer
    
dynamic depends DLR(dynamic language runtime), which is not available in my environment. –  Raymond May 6 '13 at 10:11
    
@Raymond what platform are you on? I updated my answer with a way to do this manually via reflection. –  Chris Sinclair May 6 '13 at 10:31
    
Thanks, reflection gives us the final answer. However, I may restructure my current code avoid use this heavy skill in code. Anyway, we have the answer. I solved my question, finally. –  Raymond May 6 '13 at 11:37

You can first cast it to object then T:

Add((T)(object)item)

But you should be cautious about run-time errors, and define T and T2 in a way that it does not cause an issue.

share|improve this answer
    
// pass compile, but throw exception at runtime. –  Raymond May 6 '13 at 11:01

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