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I am having Delphi XE2 Project to write some values in Windows Registry. I am trying to run RegEdit in Delphi Environment. I have tried the following codes :

procedure TMainForm.BitBtn01Click(Sender: TObject);
  begin
    ShellExecute(handle,'','C:\WINDOWS\regedit.exe',
    '[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000001}\Subnode 01]
    @=hex(2):25,00,53,00,79,00,73,00,74,00,65,00,6d,00,52,00,6f,00,6f,\
      00,74,00,25,00,5c,00,53,00,79,00,73,00,74,00,65,00,6d,00,33,00,32,00,5c,00,\
      41,00,70,00,70,00,6c,00,69,00,63,00,61,00,74,00,69,00,6f,00,6e,00,20,00,57,\
      00,69,00,7a,00,61,00,72,00,64,00,20,00,30,00,31,00,2e,00,64,00,6c,00,6c,00,\
      00,00'
      ,nil,SW_SHOW);
  end;

But it is not compiling. My requirement is to write Expandable String Value for Subnode 01 as "%SystemRoot%\System32\Application Wizard 01.dll". Active Platform for my project is 32Bit but 64Bit is also added and my application will run under both the platform as Administrator.

I think my problem can be resolved by calling Wow64DisableWow64FsRedirection Function and Wow64EnableWow64FsRedirection Function. But it is not clear when to call it. Here is another details of my project.

share|improve this question
    
Are you trying to launch the RegEdit application or are you trying to write some registry values? Those are two different things. –  Jerry Dodge May 6 '13 at 10:03
    
@Jerry, as it's mentioned in the question: "My requirement is to write Expandable String Value", so it's just about WriteExpandString. –  TLama May 6 '13 at 10:11
3  
Execute RegEdit from your own application just to write to registry is like having the key but always ring the bell to let you get inside –  Sir Rufo May 6 '13 at 10:36
    
As I told you in a previous post, reg is better than regedit for this. –  David Heffernan May 6 '13 at 11:22
    
I didn't get the point here at all. If the app should run as 32bit and 64bit you have 2 executables and 2 dll (one for each platform). But you can use the same code in both of them and also the dll can have the same name, because they are separated by different locations. Windows takes care for that different locations with this redirection. So whats the real point to have your 32bit app point to the location where the 64bit dll should exists? –  Sir Rufo May 6 '13 at 11:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Don't try to fail the redirection, just use this force to make your life easier.

If you put a DLL file to the global Windows store, you have to put it into the System32 folder. But this folder differs depending on the OS platform and the platform supported by your application.

x32 OS / x32 app -> %SystemRoot%\System32
x64 OS / x64 app -> %SystemRoot%\System32
x64 OS / x32 app -> %SystemRoot%\SysWow64

For your convenience Windows has an automated redirection also when writing to the registry from a x32 app on a x64 OS so you don't have to put an extra handling for this.

As designed you write with this code always the right path to your DLL file.

const
  c_RegKey = 'CLSID\{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000001}\Subnode 01';
  c_DllFile = '%systemroot%\system32\Understanding3264_lib.dll';

var
  LReg : TRegistry;
begin
  LReg := TRegistry.Create;
  try
    LReg.RootKey := HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT;

    if LReg.OpenKey( c_RegKey, True )
    then
      try

        // we write as REG_EXPAND_SZ to flag that this contain environment variables
        // that has to be expanded

        LReg.WriteExpandString( '', c_DllFile );

      finally
        LReg.CloseKey;
      end
    else
      raise Exception.CreateFmt( 'Not allowed to create the registry key HKCR\%s', [c_DllFile] );
  finally
    LReg.Free;
  end;
end;

One codebase for all three cases without any compiler switches or OS platform checking.

But you have to take care on installation, to put the files in the right place.

Here is an example script for Inno Setup which handles both platforms. On x32 OS it will only install the x32 app, on x64 OS it will install both (x32/x64) apps.

; Extended sample from
; -- 64BitTwoArch.iss --
; Demonstrates how to install a program built for two different
; architectures (x86 and x64) using a single installer.

; SEE THE DOCUMENTATION FOR DETAILS ON CREATING .ISS SCRIPT FILES!

[Setup]
AppName=Understanding3264
AppVersion=1.0
AppId={{BD2CF2C0-B8A4-40C9-8161-917544CB2E5C}
DefaultDirName={pf}\Understanding3264
DefaultGroupName=Understanding3264
UninstallDisplayIcon={app}\Understanding3264.exe
Compression=lzma2
SolidCompression=yes
OutputDir=Setup
OutputBaseFilename=Understanding3264_Setup
; "ArchitecturesInstallIn64BitMode=x64" requests that the install be
; done in "64-bit mode" on x64, meaning it should use the native
; 64-bit Program Files directory and the 64-bit view of the registry.
; On all other architectures it will install in "32-bit mode".
ArchitecturesInstallIn64BitMode=x64
; Note: We don't set ProcessorsAllowed because we want this
; installation to run on all architectures (including Itanium,
; since it's capable of running 32-bit code too).

[Files]

; 32bit Platform only 32bit Application

Source: ".\Win32\Release\Understanding3264.exe"; DestDir: "{app}"; Check: not Is64BitInstallMode
Source: ".\Win32\Release\Understanding3264_lib.dll"; DestDir: "{sys}"; Check: not Is64BitInstallMode

; 64bit Platforms install 64bit and 32bit Application

Source: ".\Win64\Release\Understanding3264.exe"; DestDir: "{app}"; Check: Is64BitInstallMode
Source: ".\Win64\Release\Understanding3264_lib.dll"; DestDir: "{sys}"; Check: Is64BitInstallMode
Source: ".\Win32\Release\Understanding3264.exe"; DestDir: "{app}\x32"; Check: Is64BitInstallMode
Source: ".\Win32\Release\Understanding3264_lib.dll"; DestDir: "{syswow64}"; Check: Is64BitInstallMode

[Icons]
Name: "{group}\Understanding3264"; Filename: "{app}\Understanding3264.exe"
; link to x32 app when on x64 OS
Name: "{group}\Understanding3264 (32bit)"; Filename: "{app}\x32\Understanding3264.exe"; Check: Is64BitInstallMode
Name: "{group}\{cm:UninstallProgram, Understanding3264}"; Filename: "{uninstallexe}"

[Registry]
; clean the registry on uninstall
Root: "HKCR"; Subkey: "CLSID\{{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000001}"; Flags: dontcreatekey uninsdeletekey
; if x64 OS we also have to take care on the registry key created by the x32 application
Root: "HKCR32"; Subkey: "CLSID\{{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000001}"; Flags: dontcreatekey uninsdeletekey; Check: Is64BitInstallMode

and this is the sample application (one codebase for both platforms). There is one compiler switch, to set the form caption. That's all.

unit Main_ViewU;

interface

uses
  Winapi.Windows, Winapi.Messages, System.SysUtils, System.Variants, System.Classes, Vcl.Graphics,
  Vcl.Controls, Vcl.Forms, Vcl.Dialogs, Vcl.StdCtrls;

const
  c_RegKey = 'CLSID\{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000001}\Subnode 01';

  // Because Windows does a magic redirection, we can use the same string
  // for both platforms x32/x64
  // x32 app on x32 OS -> %systemroot%\system32\Understanding3264_lib.dll
  // x64 app on x64 OS -> %systemroot%\system32\Understanding3264_lib.dll
  // x32 app on x64 OS -> %systemroot%\SysWow64\Understanding3264_lib.dll

  c_DllFile = '%systemroot%\system32\Understanding3264_lib.dll';

type
  TGetInfoFunc = function : WideString; stdcall;

type
  TMain_View = class( TForm )
    GetInfo_Button : TButton;
    RegisterLib_Button : TButton;
    DllFileName_Label : TLabel;
    procedure FormCreate( Sender : TObject );
    procedure GetInfo_ButtonClick( Sender : TObject );
    procedure RegisterLib_ButtonClick( Sender : TObject );
  private

  public

  end;

var
  Main_View : TMain_View;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

uses
  Registry;

function ExpandEnvironmentStringsStr( const AStr : string ) : string;
begin
  SetLength( Result, ExpandEnvironmentStrings( PChar( AStr ), nil, 0 ) );
  ExpandEnvironmentStrings( PChar( AStr ), PChar( Result ), Length( Result ) );
end;

procedure TMain_View.GetInfo_ButtonClick( Sender : TObject );
var
  LReg :         TRegistry;
  LRegDataInfo : TRegDataInfo;
  LDllFileName : string;
  LLib :         HMODULE;
  LFunc :        TGetInfoFunc;
  LStr :         string;
begin
  LReg := TRegistry.Create;
  try
    LReg.RootKey := HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT;

    if LReg.OpenKeyReadOnly( c_RegKey )
    then
      if LReg.GetDataInfo( '', LRegDataInfo )
      then
        begin
          case LRegDataInfo.RegData of
            rdString : // just read the string
              LDllFileName := LReg.ReadString( '' );
            rdExpandString : // string needs to be expanded
              LDllFileName := ExpandEnvironmentStringsStr( LReg.ReadString( '' ) );
          end;
        end;

  finally
    LReg.Free;
  end;

  // just for information
  DllFileName_Label.Caption := LDllFileName;

  // no info from registry
  if LDllFileName = ''
  then
    raise Exception.Create( 'Not registered' );

  // load the library
  LLib := LoadLibrary( PChar( LDllFileName ) );
  if LLib <> 0
  then
    try
      @LFunc := GetProcAddress( LLib, 'GetInfo' );
      LStr   := LFunc;
    finally
      FreeLibrary( LLib );
    end
  else
    raise Exception.CreateFmt( 'Dll-File "%s" not found!', [LDllFileName] );

  // show the information
  ShowMessage( LStr );
end;

procedure TMain_View.RegisterLib_ButtonClick( Sender : TObject );
var
  LReg : TRegistry;
begin
  LReg := TRegistry.Create;
  try
    LReg.RootKey := HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT;

    if LReg.OpenKey( c_RegKey, True )
    then
      try

        // we write as REG_EXPAND_SZ to flag that this contain environment variables
        // that has to be expanded

        LReg.WriteExpandString( '', c_DllFile );

      finally
        LReg.CloseKey;
      end
    else
      raise Exception.CreateFmt( 'Not allowed to create the registry key HKCR\%s', [c_DllFile] );
  finally
    LReg.Free;
  end;
end;

procedure TMain_View.FormCreate( Sender : TObject );
begin
  Caption := Application.Title{$IFDEF Win64} + ' (x64)'{$ELSE} + ' (x32)'{$ENDIF};
end;

end.
share|improve this answer

Try like that:

Uses
  ShellApi;

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
  begin
    ShellExecute(handle,'','C:\WINDOWS\regedit.exe',
    '[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000001}\Subnode 01]'+
    '@=hex(2):25,00,53,00,79,00,73,00,74,00,65,00,6d,00,52,00,6f,00,6f,'+
    '00,74,00,25,00,5c,00,53,00,79,00,73,00,74,00,65,00,6d,00,33,00,32,00,5c,00,'+
    '41,00,70,00,70,00,6c,00,69,00,63,00,61,00,74,00,69,00,6f,00,6e,00,20,00,57,'+
    '00,69,00,7a,00,61,00,72,00,64,00,20,00,30,00,31,00,2e,00,64,00,6c,00,6c,00,'+
    '00,00', nil, SW_SHOW);
  end;
share|improve this answer
    
You code gives lots of errors after running. Errors are telling "file system error", "Registry Import Error". –  user2325284 May 6 '13 at 10:41
    
this is your code, I just made it acceptable by delphi compiler. Instead of shellexecute I would go with TRegistry class. Have you ever try it?docwiki.embarcadero.com/CodeExamples/XE4/en/TRegistry_(Delphi) –  Mehmet Fide May 6 '13 at 11:40
    
@BasePointer What's not made clear in the question is that the registry redirector re-writes strings for you in a way that makes it impossible to write the desired string from a 32 bit process on 64 bit. The question linked from this question covers that. –  David Heffernan May 6 '13 at 12:12

You don't use a valid string. When doing a line break in a string, you need to close it and concatinate it with the + sign.

e.g.:

AFunction(..., 
'text1' +
'text2' +
'text3', ...);

or write the whole string parameter in one line.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry! Sir Rufo. Thanks a lot for your code. But it not working. Registry key is written under "[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Wow6432Node\CLSID\{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000001}\Sub‌​node 01]" though it is not the actual problem, it can be resolved using "RegistryEntry.Access:= KEY_WRITE or KEY_WOW64_64KEY", but the actual problem is that "32Bit" compiler version is running under "64Bit" environment and the string is written as "%SystemRoot%\SysWow64\Understanding3264_lib.dll" but not the "%SystemRoot%\System32\Understanding3264_lib.dll". –  user2325284 May 7 '13 at 16:04
    
My simple requirement is to write the string "%SystemRoot%\System32\Understanding3264_lib.dll" after running a 32Bit application under 64Bit environment. If, only the 64Bit Compiler version is to allowed to run in 64BitOS and 32Bit Compiler version is to restrict in 32BitOS, then only the problem may please be resolved. –  user2325284 May 7 '13 at 16:08

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