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I have a binary number (52 bits) represented as a string "01100011...."

What would be the quickest way to count the number of 1's?

"01100011....".count("1")

obviously works but is quite time consuming if this operation needs to be done thousands of times.

ok, some more info. I am trying to create bit vectors for words as follows

def bit_vec(str)
    alphabet = 'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ'
    bv = ""
    alphabet.each_char do |a|
    	if str.include?(a)
    		bv += "1"
    	else
    		bv += "0"
    	end
    end
        bv
end

The bit_vec method gets called about 170K times. I store the bit vectors in a hash and use them to find similar words for a given word by XOR'ing the bit vectors and counting the number of 1's (more 1's == less similarity). If the count method does not use String#scan the what else could use it?

I know Ruby is slower than say C or Java. I am just looking to improve the algorithm the best I can. I am not looking for raw speed.

Maybe the include? method is the bottleneck?

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Instead of the bit vectors, I could try storing the strings as an array of letters and do something like this (["a", "b", "c"] & ["x","b","x"]).size –  Maulin Oct 28 '09 at 22:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Note that the problem of counting 1-bits is referred to as a "population count".

At least in Ruby, stick with handling these as a string via the count method unless you have a compelling reason to use integers.

count:

Benchmark: 78.60s for 10,000,000 iterations (127,225.63 iterations per second)

For integer math,

If you don't care about values above 2**32,

def popcount(x)
  m1 = 0x55555555
  m2 = 0x33333333
  m4 = 0x0f0f0f0f
  x -= (x >> 1) & m1
  x = (x & m2) + ((x >> 2) & m2)
  x = (x + (x >> 4)) & m4
  x += x >> 8
  return (x + (x >> 16)) & 0x3f
end

Benchmark: 105.73s for 10,000,000 iterations (94,579.03 iterations per second)

If you do care about values above 2**32,

def popcount(x)
  b = 0
  while x > 0
    x &= x - 1
    b += 1
  end
  return b
end

Benchmark: 365.59s for 10,000,000 iterations (27,353.27 iterations per second)

Addenda:

Your code:

Benchmark: 78.25s for 1,000,000 iterations (12,779.56 iterations per second)

This code:

def bit_vec(str)
  # alphabet = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
  bv = "0" * 52
  str.each_char do |c|
    ord = c.ord
    next unless (ord >= 65 && ord <= 90) || (ord >= 97 && ord <= 122)
    index = ord - 65
    index -= 6 if index > 25
    bv[index] = "1"
    break if bv == "1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111"
  end
  bv
end

Note: You said that you were dealing with a 52-bit number, so I assumed that you cared about both upper and lower case letters (26 + 26 = 52). I opted to check for uppercase first because that's how they appear in pretty much every character set ever, making the calculations a little easier.

Benchmark: 24.86s for 1,000,000 iterations (40,231.60 iterations per second)

3.14x speed-up.

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Thanks for the detailed answer. That helped! –  Maulin Oct 29 '09 at 3:51

You are going to have O(n) performance, no matter what. Try this simple ruby command. Measure if it's really a problem.

This simple script, measured with time ruby test.rb took 0.058 CPU seconds. This is on an old 1.25 Ghz processor. Are you really sure this operation is too slow?

10000.times do
  "0100010000100001111101101000111110000001101001010".count("1")
end

If that isn't fast enough write a C extension. Try to avoid using conditionals. Write it like this:

count = 0;
for (i = stringLength; i; i++) {
    count += string[i] - '0';     // no conditional used.
}

But honestly, if you need that kind of speed ruby is the wrong language for you. There are so many different things in ruby that take much more time than a simple .count("1").

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I ran my program with rprofile and it showed that 38% of the time is being spent using String#scan (170K calls). I thought that if there was a clever way to count the 1's I might be able to speed things up a little. –  Maulin Oct 28 '09 at 21:03
    
I don't think .count() uses String#scan internally. Maybe your bottleneck is somewhere else. –  Georg Schölly Oct 28 '09 at 21:29
    
How can I find out what methods use String#scan internally? –  Maulin Oct 28 '09 at 22:21
    
Use a profiler that tells you or look at the source. ruby-lang.org/en/downloads –  Georg Schölly Oct 28 '09 at 22:39

from http://www.bergek.com/2009/03/11/count-number-of-bits-in-a-ruby-integer/

yourString.scan(/1/).size


from http://snippets.dzone.com/posts/show/4233

count = 0
count += byte & 1 and byte >>= 1 until byte == 0


Here is a post with different loops (in c) for counting based on the density of 0's vs. 1's

http://gurmeetsingh.wordpress.com/2008/08/05/fast-bit-counting-routines/

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4  
scan(/1/).size is more than 10 times slower than count("1"). –  Georg Schölly Oct 28 '09 at 20:35
    
I benchmarked it and it's true. String#count is fast! –  tadman Oct 28 '09 at 21:24
    
+1 for bitshift loop. –  EmFi Oct 29 '09 at 7:11

Split the string in 8, look up each entry in a 128 entry lookup table and sum them up?

I know.. this is ridiculous... just sharing some ideas ;-)

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+1 - This may be the fastest approach, as ridiculous as it sounds. Even if they were grouped in groups of 4, it may be a bit slower but the lookup table would be so much smaller. –  James Black Oct 28 '09 at 20:13
    
Hashing the 8 bytes is going to take longer than just counting the occurrences of 1s. –  Georg Schölly Oct 28 '09 at 20:30
    
If you split by 8, wouldn't you need 256 entries in your lookup table? –  Carl Norum Oct 28 '09 at 22:58
    
This will be slower than count in Ruby, almost guaranteed. –  Bob Aman Oct 29 '09 at 0:54

Here is another benchmark: https://gist.github.com/knugie/3865903

Simply run it on your machine if you're in doubt.

Ruby should not be used for maximum optimization, but checking for bottlenecks in your code is always reasonable. An Algorithm that works well in one domain does not necessarily work well in another one. Try to use real data from your application for optimization.

Sample OUTPUT:

$ ruby bit_count_benchmark.rb
CPU       : Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU P8400 @ 2.26GHz 
MEM       : 3083288 kB
RUBY      : ruby-1.9.2-p320

"NORM":
  TEST... OK
  BENCHMARK (2000000): 
    PREPARE... OK
    RUN...
                             user     system      total        real
scan_string            227.770000   0.250000 228.020000 (227.912435)
scan_regex             214.500000   0.220000 214.720000 (214.635405)
progressive_right_shift 43.420000   0.030000  43.450000 ( 43.412643)
continuous_right_shift  39.340000   0.010000  39.350000 ( 39.345163)
count_string            19.910000   0.030000  19.940000 ( 19.932677)
access_bit_fast         18.310000   0.040000  18.350000 ( 18.345740)
bit_elimination_for     16.400000   0.010000  16.410000 ( 16.388461)
bit_elimination_until   14.650000   0.000000  14.650000 ( 14.650187)
bit_elimination_while   14.610000   0.000000  14.610000 ( 14.604845)
pre_compute_16           4.370000   0.000000   4.370000 (  4.371228)

"NORM" FINISHED


"LOTTO":
  TEST... OK
  BENCHMARK (2000000): 
    PREPARE... OK
    RUN...
                             user     system      total        real
scan_string             92.900000   0.100000  93.000000 ( 92.947647)
scan_regex              79.500000   0.230000  79.730000 ( 79.671581)
progressive_right_shift 43.430000   0.010000  43.440000 ( 43.424880)
continuous_right_shift  35.360000   0.020000  35.380000 ( 35.360854)
count_string            19.210000   0.020000  19.230000 ( 19.215173)
access_bit_fast         17.890000   0.000000  17.890000 ( 17.890401)
bit_elimination_for      5.680000   0.010000   5.690000 (  5.680348)
bit_elimination_until    5.040000   0.010000   5.050000 (  5.054189)
bit_elimination_while    5.080000   0.020000   5.100000 (  5.093165)
pre_compute_16           4.360000   0.010000   4.370000 (  4.364988)

"LOTTO" FINISHED


DONE
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