Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using play framework with static assets only, so I write my Javascripts and CSS files directly and test them in the browser (firebug console). Due to the fact that I am messing around with typos most of the time, I would like to use JavaScript code quality tools and/or compilers.

  • A friend told me to use JSLint which alerts me on code problems. It seems to me that I have to install node.js to run JSLint on my Javascript assets, and then I don't have a clue how to integrate this into my play sbt build process. So before I take a look on that, I'd like to ask: It is worthy? When I use a javascript compiler, does JSLint bring any further advantages?
  • CoffeeScript: -support should be very simple in play. I like it, because there should be even less to write on the coffeescript side. But does it also do syntax checking, optimizing and minifying? Can I embed plain JavaScript if I want to optimize a part for myself while keeping everything on the right place?
  • Google Closure Compiler: Ok, this one does Javascript to Javascript, so can I chain it with Coffeescript? So then I should have everything (Code less, Syntax check, Optimization, Minify), or can Closure even do all this on his own? Does it also optimize jquery snippets?

Last question: Is there eclipse IDE support for Coffeescript?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. JsLint used to be a really powerful tool, but it is fairly outdated as far as I am concerned. It fails to pick-up a lot of patterns and newer practices and a lot of ES5 sugar. It has poor semantic understanding and with proper jsDoc you can do the same job with the Closure Compiler. Using both is a bit overkill and pointless.

  2. CoffeeScript is a really good choice. It compiles to JavaScript and it is a really nice experience overall.

    The TextMate bundle is very good when it comes to CoffeeScript.

    https://github.com/jashkenas/coffee-script-tmbundle

    You can find some other nice IDE integrations on the official CoffeeScript page:

    http://jashkenas.github.com/coffee-script/#resources

  3. The Closure Compiler is JS to JS indeed, but CoffeeScript compiles to JavaScript and you can use it to minify the output of the compiled CoffeeScript. It should give you a nice performance boost. You need to add the jsDoc @annotations to CoffeeScript if you want to benefit from the full power of the Closure Compiler. Here's more on this.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, perfectly answered all my questions! I was a little bit confused how JS Lint and CoffeeScript go together. And your last hint is also very worthy, because I wouldn't have expected, that there are already requirements out there to chain these compilers together. Thank you a lot! –  Jürgen Zornig May 6 '13 at 11:42
3  
For you to be able to use jQuery with closure compiler you need the externs file, calls to jQuery will not cause compile errors but jQuery itself will not be compiled. You can use closure library instead of jQuery then everything will be compiled. code.google.com/p/closure-compiler/source/browse/contrib/… I found using closure with closure library has a steep learning curve and getting an ebook to read about it first might be helpfull. –  HMR May 6 '13 at 12:02

We will be improving our JS support in Play for 2.3. In particular we'll look at supporting JSLint, Closure and/or others. The approach taken will likely be an SBT based one so that there is applicability even outside of Play.

share|improve this answer
    
i think the support of coffeescript and google closure is quite good at the moment with play 2.1.1. All I didn't know was how js quality tools like JSLint fit into this "js compiler approach". Also the CoffeeScript website mentions that "...The compiled output is readable and pretty-printed, passes through JavaScript Lint without warnings..." so I think extra JS Lint support isn't really needed –  Jürgen Zornig May 9 '13 at 9:09
    
Yes, but we also need to deal with non-CoffeeScript situations. –  Christopher Hunt May 9 '13 at 12:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.