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I have 3 functions, with the third function under the first that I want to run in the second.

function first () {
    function third () {
    }
}

function second () {
    third ();
}

How can I make second run third correctly?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
What is happening incorrectly? –  James Black Oct 28 '09 at 20:49
    
@james, third is a private method within first and second cannot call it –  Allen Rice Oct 28 '09 at 20:59
    
I just like to know what is happening. :) Did they run it and get an error? –  James Black Oct 28 '09 at 21:09
    
Yes, you'll likely get a "not defined" error. There is no way that this will work. –  Ates Goral Oct 28 '09 at 21:11
    
@ ates, it wont work as is, but you can either make it public or make a public method that calls the private method. There are also multiple ways to approach either solution –  Allen Rice Oct 28 '09 at 21:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That depends on how you want to setup the first function and how you want to access it. Basically the third method is private to first. You'll need a public method on first to call third. That method would be called by second.

There are various ways to do this, one that comes to mind is this...

Edit: I named the parameters a little better, that way its not "param" over and over.

function first()
{
    // define first's private
    var third = function(third_param)
    {
        alert(third_param);
    }

    // define first's public that calls the private
    this.callThird = function (call_third_param)
    {
        third(call_third_param);
    }

}

function second ()
{
    // get an instance of first
    var temp = new first();

    // call the public method on it
    temp.callThird('argument');
}

If you don't care about third being private, you can do

function first() { }

// public method
first.prototype.third = function(third_param)
{
    alert(third_param);
}


function second ()
{
    // get an instance of first
    var temp = new first();

    // call the public method on it
    temp.third('argument');
}

or, this way, this is also not using privates

function first()
{
    // the "this", makes it public
    this.third = function(third_param)
    {
        alert(third_param);
    }

}

function second ()
{
    // get an instance of first
    var temp = new first();

    // call the public method on it
    temp.third('argument');
}

If you are trying to just do a namespace kind of thing, you can do this (no privates as well)

// define an object and name it first
var first =
{
    // give first a public variable but make it a function with an arg
    third : function(third_param)
    {
        alert(third_param);
    }

}

function second ()
{
    // call the third method on the first variable
    first.third('argument');
}

But probably the best way is via namespacing

var first = (function () {
    // define first's private function, store it in 'third', a private variable
    var third = function (third_param) {
        alert(third_param);
    };

    // return this object to the 'first' variable
    return { // define first's public that calls the private
        'callThird': function (call_third_param) {
            third(call_third_param);
        }
    };
} ());  // this line runs the function, closure'ing over the privates and 
// returning an object (that has access to the privates) to the 'first' variable

function second () {
    // usage:
    first.callThird("Hello World!");
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is awesome. Thank you. –  Mark Nov 3 '09 at 0:37

Javascript won't easily allow it, why would you need to do that in the first place, you might want to use objects or prototypes to accomplish this.

function first(){
   third();
}

function second(){

}

function third(){
  second();
}
share|improve this answer

Why don't you make third() a function not nested under first(), and then just have first() and second() call third()?

e.g.

function first(){
   third();
}

function second(){
   third();
}

function third(){

}
share|improve this answer

Your best bet is to pull the function out that is common to both, and just call it where needed.

var thirdf = function third () {
}

function first () {
  thirdf();
}

function second () {
  thirdf();
}
share|improve this answer

Make first return third. This suggestion makes more sense if your example looks more like this:

function first(foo) {  // notice that foo is local to first
  function third() {
    // do something with foo in the outer scope
  }
  return third;
}

function second(bar) {
  bar(); // call whatever gets passed in
}

second(first());  // third (created inside first) gets passed to second

If you don't have any variables that are local to first (unlike my example, where I used foo), there's no point in not defining third in the global namespace i.e. you should do this instead:

function first() {
}

function second() {
  third();
}

function third() {
}
share|improve this answer
    
interesting approach –  Allen Rice Oct 28 '09 at 21:12

Leaving aside all the "why would you want to do this?" questions, and assuming you need to do this for a legitimate reason like accessing a "private" function inside some existing code that you don't own, here's a hack:

first.toString() will give you the entire source of the function. You can inject a bit of code into that function to return you a reference to the third function:

var prober = new Function(
    first.toString().replace("{", "{ return third;") + "return first()");
var third = prober();
third(); // yay!

But, please don't do this if you really don't need to. It's a big hack that I just wanted to mention for educational purposes.

share|improve this answer
1  
I won't vote this down, but this is a very very bad idea :) –  Allen Rice Oct 28 '09 at 21:34

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