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What I understand: There is what is called a frame buffer. It is an array of pointers to buffer objects. The buffer objects can be for example render buffers, texture buffers or other. If I want to draw something I attach a render buffer to the frame buffer, draw into it and finally call a method to send it to the screen.

1) Is this correct so far?

What I don't understand:

2) I think I read somewhere that the frame buffer is created when the context is created. Alas, I cannot find anymore where I saw this. But if the frame buffer really gets created why do I have to call glGenFramebuffersOES(1, &framebuffer) and glBindFramebufferOES(GL_FRAMEBUFFER_OES, framebuffer)? As I understand it the first one creates a new frame buffer with one space for an attachment and the second line sets the context's frame buffer pointer to framebuffer. But assuming I already have a frame buffer in the context why can't I retrieve that and attach my render buffer to that instead?

3) What is the "default frame buffer"? It is a frame buffer with name 0. If there is already a default frame buffer, why do I have to create a new one if I want to draw?

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1) Is this correct so far?

Well, more or less. Conceptually a framebuffer is a set of buffers with certain semantics, one (or even zero) or more color buffers, possibly one depth buffer and possibly one stencil buffer. Those are the targets into which corresponding values of a fragment are written.

But to answer 2) and 3), you have to understand the difference between the default framebuffer and a framebuffer object (FBO). For each OpenGL context there is a default framebuffer (whose properties are specified upon context creation through some platform-specific means), which comprises the one color buffer (let's ignore double and stereo buffering for now) containing the things that get actually displayed and possibly its corresponding depth and stencil buffer. So whatever you want to see on your display has to find its way into that default framebuffer sooner or later. But the individual buffers of this default framebuffer are fixed, i.e. you cannot just bind a texture or renderbuffer to it, or switch its say depth buffer for another one (say you can only copy things into or out of them but not redirect them to some other memory area).

In addition to that you can yourself create so-called framebuffer objects (FBOs) (those created and used with all those gl...Framebuffer... functions). Those are in the end light-weight OpenGL objects (i.e. no heavy data containers) that provide a set of attachment points for the individual buffer channels (mutliple color attachments, a depth and a stencil attachment) to which you can attach actual data containers, like textures or renderbuffers. And all those attachments together define an actual framebuffer, similar to the default framebuffer. But the advantage of an FBO is, that you can attach arbitrary containers to it and it thus allows things like rendering directly into a texture. Likewise is it not bound to some OS resource or display and thus allows offscreen-rendering in general.

So for the day-to-day work of displaying (possibly depth and stencil tested) primitives to the screen, the default framebuffer perfectly suffices and you don't need to mess with FBOs at all. FBOs are used if you e.g. want to draw something offscreen that is not going to be displayed, usually directly into a texture to be used for further processing, or mabe to be read from the CPU and processed there. Good examples are shadow map creation (where you render the scene into a depth texture that is then used when rendering the to be shadowed object to the screen) or post-processing effects (where you render the scene into a color texture to be fed through some additional post-processing shaders before finally put to screen). But the uses cases are in the end countless.

So let's look at your questions again (beware of repetitions, though ;)):

2) I think I read somewhere that the frame buffer is created when the context is created.

Yes, but that framebuffer is not the same thing as a framebuffer object.

But if the frame buffer really gets created why do I have to call glGenFramebuffersOES(1, &framebuffer) and glBindFramebufferOES(GL_FRAMEBUFFER_OES, framebuffer)?

That is in turn for creating your own framebuffer objects different from the default framebuffer.

But assuming I already have a frame buffer in the context why can't I retrieve that and attach my render buffer to that instead?

Because the default framebuffer doesn't have the functionality of a full fledged framebuffer object and doesn't allow the redicrection of its data into some other data container like a renderbuffer. It only has its predefined storage that is connected to the actual display OS resource.

3) What is the "default frame buffer"? It is a frame buffer with name 0. If there is already a default frame buffer, why do I have to create a new one if I want to draw?

Same as above. The FBO ID 0 is rather a placeholder for the default framebuffer and thus means "no FBO at all". This means when doing glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, 0) (which is the only function you can call with an ID of 0) you tell the GL, that you from now on want to work (read from and draw to) the default framebuffer and not some custom FBO.

So the bottom line is, the default framebuffer created on context creation doesn't have the full functionality of a framebuffer object, namely attaching arbitrary memory regions as individual buffers, which is needed in certain (but not all) rendering scenarios. And if you need this functionality you have to create and manage framebuffer objects (FBOs) with the functions you listed in your question.

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Wow, awesome. Let me take some time to read your answer carefully. – Matt N. May 6 '13 at 16:58
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@MattN. - In addition to what Christian says above, framebuffer objects are the only rendering target on iOS, so you won't be working with the default framebuffer on this platform. – Brad Larson May 6 '13 at 17:17
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@BradLarson So on iOS there is indeed an already existing default FBO in play? If there is a way to access this one (and maybe even reattach its attachments), you might want to provide an additional answer giving more insight into the intricacies of iOS (which I for myself cannot). – Christian Rau May 6 '13 at 18:57
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@ChristianRau - It's more that you have to create an FBO for any kind of rendering you want to do, onscreen or off. Onscreen rendering is done by creating an FBO and attaching it to the UI layer on which it will be displayed. Trying to render to or work with the default framebuffer usually leads to nothing happening, if I remember correctly. – Brad Larson May 6 '13 at 19:06
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@MattN. "Christian's answer suggested the possibility of sending a render buffer object directly to the default frame buffer." - That isn't suggested by the answer anyway, which clearly states that you can not attach a custom renderbuffer to the default framebuffer, iOS or not. – Christian Rau May 7 '13 at 7:33

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