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I am working on PHP page that connects with Oracle. I came across this SQL and I am not sure it is doing what is supposed to, so I thought I would ask here. The SQL in question is like this:

select tableA.id, tableA.name, tableB.details 
from tableA
left join tableB on
tableB.id = tableA.id
and 
tableB.logId = '<logged_in_user>'

Now when I log in as a user who does not have entries in tableB, I am still getting records when this query runs. And my hypothesis is that instead of 'and' the clause should have been 'where'.

left join tableB on
    tableB.id = tableA.id
    where
    tableB.logId = '<logged_in_user>'

So my two questions are.

  1. Am I right?
  2. If so, then why does the query return result? what is the 'and' clause checking?

Could someone explain the difference when using AND vs WHERE in the above query?

Thanks in advance!

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Since you haven't told us what tableA and tableB are, or what behaviour you want to see from this query, we can't advise you on what the query should be. All we can do is point out that left join tableB on ... where tableB.logId = ... will always be wrong. –  Mark Bannister May 6 '13 at 14:22
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Am I right?

No. This query:

select tableA.id, tableA.name, tableB.details 
from tableA
left join tableB
on tableB.id = tableA.id
and tableB.logId = '<logged_in_user>'

Is very different from:

select tableA.id, tableA.name, tableB.details 
from tableA
left join tableB
on tableB.id = tableA.id
where tableB.logId = '<logged_in_user>'

It's the criteria for joining.

In the first case, you take from A, then join with B when there's a matching id and a logId, else leave details null.

In the second, you take from A, then join with B when there's a matching id, else leave details null, and then you keep only rows from A where there's a B match that has a logId -- eliminating rows from A in the process, and de facto turning it into an inner join.

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+1 because this is an alternative, but isn't it resolved in a much cleaner fashion leveraging an INNER JOIN? –  Michael Perrenoud May 6 '13 at 14:18
    
yeah, I was incidentally editing my last paragraph to add that remark. :) –  Denis May 6 '13 at 14:18
    
Thank you very much! That explains a lot.. The only one thing I am still confused about is: In the first one, since logId will not find a match for logged in user, should it not give any results? because the condition and tableB.logId = '<logged_in_user>' would not have results? –  Undefined Variable May 6 '13 at 14:19
    
@open_sourse, you would need to use IS NOT NULL to manage NULL values. –  Michael Perrenoud May 6 '13 at 14:21
    
@open_sourse: A left join B means: if B then take stuff from A and B else take stuff from A and null. A inner join B means: take stuff from A and B if and only if there is A and B. –  Denis May 6 '13 at 14:23
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If you only want results with values in both tables what you really want is an inner join. Once you have that, it doesn't really matter where you filter results out.

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Now when I log in as a user who does not have entries in tableB, I am still getting records when this query runs.

Simply change the query to use an inner join like this:

select tableA.id, tableA.name, tableB.details 
from tableA
inner join tableB ...

and here is the definition of left join from Oracle:

The LEFT JOIN (also called LEFT OUTER JOIN) keyword returns all rows from the left table (table_name1), even if there are no matches in the right table (table_name2).

whereas the definition of the inner join is:

The INNER JOIN keyword return rows when there is at least one match in both tables.

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Thank you! I realize that inner join is the way to go here...I am just still trying to wrap my head around why AND clause gave me results - I guess I will have to read more on the joins.. –  Undefined Variable May 6 '13 at 14:21
    
@open_sourse, because you would need to leverage IS NOT NULL to handle NULL values -so you'd have to add to your WHERE clause. –  Michael Perrenoud May 6 '13 at 14:22
    
Thanks for your help! –  Undefined Variable May 6 '13 at 14:28
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