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I'm currently stuck with accessing an array, where the name of the array is defined by $_GET.

If I have the following arrays:

$test = array('Hello', 'Apples', 'Green');
$AnotherArray = array('Blue', 'Sun');

Then I want to display the array $test, when I open my script like this:

ajax.php?arrayName=test

Thanks for the help in advance.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Kzqai, Till Helge, Wouter J, Jocelyn, likeitlikeit Jun 4 '13 at 0:10

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
Please consider what this might mean, you're giving users direct access to your code, a solution which checks arrayName for specific names and checks accordingly is probably better. ALWAYS SANITIZE YOUR INPUT – Benjamin Gruenbaum May 6 '13 at 14:41
1  
Please take the answers with a grain of salt, and keep security and simplicity in mind. Generally you can almost always avoid variable variables, and certainly you should always avoid them in conjunction with user input, the majority of answers here aside. Your question format did kind of beg this type of answer, unfortunately, but try simpler solutions! – Kzqai May 6 '13 at 14:47
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could accomplish this with variable variables:

$the_array = ${$_GET['arrayName']};

Important

This is like working with dynamite, because a malicious user can easily swap the variable name with something else and wrack your app.

A best practice is to white-list the variable name first:

$safe_vars = array('test', 'AnotherArray');
if (in_array($_GET['arrayName'], $safe_vars, true)) {
    $the_array = ${$_GET['arrayName']};
}

Alternative

As mentioned by Pekka 웃, you could also consider having the accessible arrays inside one mother array:

$arrays = array(
    'test' => array('Hello', 'Apples', 'Green'),
    'AnotherArray' = array('Blue', 'Sun')
);

if (isset($arrays[$_GET['arrayName']])) {
    $the_array = $arrays[$_GET['arrayName']];
}

The good thing here is that no magic is used, just simple array dereferencing.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Pekka웃 Added a good practice to my answer. – Ja͢ck May 6 '13 at 14:43
1  
That looks like the nicest approach. (Or having an array of arrays, and allowing access only to its elements) – Pekka 웃 May 6 '13 at 14:45
    
@Pekka웃 Thanks for the good idea! – Ja͢ck May 6 '13 at 14:50

Please do not use variable variables for this simple task:

Generally, just use the "arrayName" or a similar parameter as a suggestion only, and don't use the user input directly, to keep secure.

In this case, I would actually simply suggest using an integer:

url?showdata=1 //Shows the $test array

and

url?showdata=2 // Shows the $AnotherArray

etc

url?showdata=3 // Shows another array of your choice

Or if you must complicate things, just check whether the ?arrayName=something exactly equals 'test' or exactly equals 'AnotherArray' and then use the array specified.

Again, variable variables are a level of complexity and trouble that you're likely to regret for this simple situation!

share|improve this answer

Try this

$test = array('Hello', 'Apples', 'Green');
$AnotherArray = array('Blue', 'Sun');

if( $_GET['arrayName'] == 'test')
{
   print_r($test);
}
else if( $_GET['arrayName'] == 'AnotherArray')
{
   print_r($AnotherArray);
}
share|improve this answer

You can use the variable variable, but it is very important to limit this only to the 'safe' variable names.

in this example i show 2 ways of making this a safe way of using a variable variable.

<?

$_GET['arrayName'] = 'test';

$test = array('Hello', 'Apples', 'Green');
$AnotherArray = array('Blue', 'Sun');

// safety check. only allow defined arrays from this list. Check with array of allowed names.
$possibleArrays = array('test', 'AnotherArray');

if(array_search($_GET['arrayName'], $possibleArrays) !== false)
{
    var_dump($$_GET['arrayName']);
}
else
{
    echo "warning, accessing undefined array";
}

// safety check, only allow my defined arrays. Check with switch statement.
switch($_GET['arrayName'])
{
    case 'test':
    case 'AnotherArray':
        var_dump($$_GET['arrayName']);
        break;
    default:
        echo "warning, accessing undefined array";
}
share|improve this answer

Use variable variable names:

$allowedArrayNames = array( 'test', 'AnotherArray' );

if( in_array( $_GET['arrayName'], $allowedArrayNames ) && isset( $$_GET['arrayName'] ) )
{
    print_r( $$_GET['arrayName'] );
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is dangerous. It could provide access to other, private variables inside the script. – Pekka 웃 May 6 '13 at 14:41
    
@Pekka웃 Sure, but that wasn't the question. – feeela May 6 '13 at 14:42
1  
@feeela eval on the $_GET variable would solve the question too, would you suggest it based on the same logic? – Benjamin Gruenbaum May 6 '13 at 14:44
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum No. I've updated the answer to provide an alternative. – feeela May 6 '13 at 14:45
    
@feeela that's much better, thanks. – Benjamin Gruenbaum May 6 '13 at 14:48

Why not just extract? This way you don't allow access to other variables and only execute code when the variable is known?

extract($_GET);
print_r($$arrayName);

Could even add a prefix to help keep things clean.

extract($_GET,EXTR_PREFIX_ALL,"get_");
print_r($$get_arrayName);
share|improve this answer

have you tried the following :

$$_GET["arrayName"]
share|improve this answer
3  
This is dangerous. It could provide access to other, private variables inside the script. – Pekka 웃 May 6 '13 at 14:40
    
Why the downvote ? He didn't ask if it was safe, and we have no idea if he sanitized his code or not. The answer is the proper answer to the question... – Laurent S. May 6 '13 at 14:42
2  
I didn't cast the vote, but I totally agree with it - "he didn't ask if it was safe" isn't a good defense for demonstrating a bad practice. This is a public place, people of all knowledge levels learn from what we post here. – Pekka 웃 May 6 '13 at 14:43

You could use variable variables, something like this:

$arrayNameGiven = $_GET['arrayName'];    // e.g. "test"
echo $$arrayNameGiven[1];    // "Apples"

Read more here: http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.variables.variable.php

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3  
It's like you didn't even read the other answers, and the problem with this sort of thing before posting. Not only does this post a security risk, it adds nothing over other answers that were already posted. I know you just wanted to help but please read other answers and comments before adding another answer and make sure your answer adds something substential to them. – Benjamin Gruenbaum May 6 '13 at 14:45
    
To upvoter , why would you encourage this bad behavior? The goal of this is to imrpove this community, your actions are counter-productive to stackoverflow. – Benjamin Gruenbaum May 6 '13 at 17:48
1  
@Benjamin Gruenbaum, in my defense: There were no other answers when I entered mine. But you are certainly right. – uruk May 7 '13 at 6:20

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