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I have a PostgreSQL table with a title field, but these titles often contain "The" or "An" at the front, and I need a way to sort these records alphabetically as a library would, by ignoring these articles when doing the sort.

Two questions

  1. What's the best way to write this ORDER BY expression in SQL?

  2. How can I build and use an appropriate index on the title field without copying substrings of the title field values into something like an "alphabetical_title" field and indexing that?

I'm looking for a solution tailored for PostgreSQL. Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could add an index on an expression:

create index on yourtable (natural_sort(title));

Postgres will then use the index when appropriate, and won't actually calculate natural_sort(title) when it does -- unless you select that too.

That being said (and much like with tsvector fields) you'll get improved performance if you actually store the pre-calculated result for performance reasons. If, in the above case, Postgres decides to not use that index for any reason, the need to actually calculate it for each and every row considered will be a big drag on your query.

In either case, don't forget numbers:

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2007/12/sorting-for-humans-natural-sort-order.html


Here are two functions to get you started on natural sorting:

/**
 * @param text _str The input string.
 * @return text The output string for consumption in natural sorting.
 */
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION natsort(text)
    RETURNS text
AS $$
DECLARE
    _str    text := $1;
    _pad    int := 15; -- Maximum precision for PostgreSQL floats
BEGIN
    -- Bail if the string is empty
    IF  trim(_str) = ''
    THEN
        RETURN '';
    END IF;

    -- Strip accents and lower the case
    _str := lower(unaccent(_str));

    -- Replace nonsensical characters
    _str := regexp_replace(_str, E'[^a-z0-9$¢£¥₤€@&%\\(\\)\\[\\]\\{\\}_:;,\\.\\?!\\+\\-]+', ' ', 'g');

    -- Trim the result
    _str := trim(_str);

    -- @todo we'd ideally want to strip leading articles/prepositions ('a', 'the') at this stage,
    --       but to_tsvector()'s default dictionary also strips stop words (e.g. 'all').

    -- We're done if the string contains no numbers
    IF  _str !~ '[0-9]'
    THEN
        RETURN _str;
    END IF;

    -- Force spaces between numbers, so we can use regexp_split_to_table()
    _str := regexp_replace(_str, E'((?:[0-9]+|[0-9]*\\.[0-9]+)(?:e[+-]?[0-9]+\\M)?)', E' \\1 ', 'g');

    -- Pad zeros to obtain a reasonably natural looking sort order
    RETURN array_to_string(ARRAY(
    SELECT  CASE
            WHEN val !~ E'^\\.?[0-9]'
            -- Not a number; return as is
            THEN val
            -- Do our best after expanding the number...
            ELSE COALESCE(lpad(substring(val::numeric::text from '^[0-9]+'), _pad, '0'), '') ||
                COALESCE(rpad(substring(val::numeric::text from E'\\.[0-9]+'), _pad, '0'), '')
            END
    FROM    regexp_split_to_table(_str, E'\\s+') as val
    WHERE   val <> ''
    ), ' ');
END;
$$ IMMUTABLE STRICT LANGUAGE plpgsql COST 1;

COMMENT ON FUNCTION natsort(text) IS
'Rewrites a string so it can be used in natural sorting.

It''s by no means bullet proof, but it works properly for positive integers,
reasonably well for positive floats, and it''s fast enough to be used in a
trigger that populates an indexed column, or in an index directly.';

/**
 * @param text[] _values The potential values to use.
 * @return text The output string for consumption in natural sorting.
 */
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION sort(text[])
    RETURNS text
AS $$
DECLARE
    _values     alias for $1;
    _sort       text;
BEGIN
    SELECT  natsort(value)
    INTO    _sort
    FROM    unnest(_values) as value
    WHERE   value IS NOT NULL
    AND     value <> ''
    AND     natsort(value) <> ''
    LIMIT 1;

    RETURN COALESCE(_sort, '');
END;
$$ IMMUTABLE STRICT LANGUAGE plpgsql COST 1;

COMMENT ON FUNCTION sort(text[]) IS
'Returns natsort() of the first significant input argument.';

Sample output from the first function's unit tests:

public function testNatsort()
{
    $this->checkInOut('natsort', array(
        '<NULL>'                => null,
        ''                      => '',
        'ABCde'                 => 'abcde',
        '12345 12345'           => '000000000012345 000000000012345',
        '12345.12345'           => '000000000012345.123450000000000',
        '12345e5'               => '000001234500000',
        '.12345e5'              => '000000000012345',
        '1e10'                  => '000010000000000',
        '1.2e20'                => '120000000000000',
        '-12345e5'              => '- 000001234500000',
        '-.12345e5'             => '- 000000000012345',
        '-1e10'                 => '- 000010000000000',
        '-1.2e20'               => '- 120000000000000',
        '+-$¢£¥₤€@&%'           => '+-$¢£¥₤€@&%',
        'ÀÁÂÃÄÅĀĄĂÆ'            => 'aaaaaeaaaaaae',
        'ÈÉÊËĒĘĚĔĖÐ'            => 'eeeeeeeeee',
        'ÌÍÎÏĪĨĬĮİIJ'            => 'iiiiiiiiiij',
        'ÒÓÔÕÖØŌŐŎŒ'            => 'oooooeoooooe',
        'ÙÚÛÜŪŮŰŬŨŲ'            => 'uuuueuuuuuu',
        'ÝŶŸ'                   => 'yyy',
        'àáâãäåāąăæ'            => 'aaaaaeaaaaaae',
        'èéêëēęěĕėð'            => 'eeeeeeeeee',
        'ìíîïīĩĭįıij'            => 'iiiiiiiiiij',
        'òóôõöøōőŏœ'            => 'oooooeoooooe',
        'ùúûüūůűŭũų'            => 'uuuueuuuuuu',
        'ýÿŷ'                   => 'yyy',
        'ÇĆČĈĊ'                 => 'ccccc',
        'ĎĐ'                    => 'dd',
        'Ƒ'                     => 'f',
        'ĜĞĠĢ'                  => 'gggg',
        'ĤĦ'                    => 'hh',
        'Ĵ'                     => 'j',
        'Ķ'                     => 'k',
        'ŁĽĹĻĿ'                 => 'lllll',
        'ÑŃŇŅŊ'                 => 'nnnnn',
        'ŔŘŖ'                   => 'rrr',
        'ŚŠŞŜȘſ'                => 'sssssss',
        'ŤŢŦȚÞ'                 => 'ttttt',
        'Ŵ'                     => 'w',
        'ŹŽŻ'                   => 'zzz',
        'çćčĉċ'                 => 'ccccc',
        'ďđ'                    => 'dd',
        'ƒ'                     => 'f',
        'ĝğġģ'                  => 'gggg',
        'ĥħ'                    => 'hh',
        'ĵ'                     => 'j',
        'ĸķ'                    => 'kk',
        'łľĺļŀ'                 => 'lllll',
        'ñńňņʼnŋ'                => 'nnnnnn',
        'ŕřŗ'                   => 'rrr',
        'śšşŝșß'                => 'sssssss',
        'ťţŧțþ'                 => 'ttttt',
        'ŵ'                     => 'w',
        'žżź'                   => 'zzz',
        '-_aaa--zzz--'          => '-_aaa--zzz--',
        '-:àáâ;-žżź--'          => '-:aaa;-zzz--',
        '-.à$â,-ž%ź--'          => '-.a$a,-z%z--',
        '--à$â--ž%ź--'          => '--a$a--z%z--',
        '-$à(â--ž)ź%-'          => '-$a(a--z)z%-',
        '#-à$â--ž?!ź-'          => '-a$a--z?!z-',
    ));
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  1. You can use various string functions in PostgreSQL but maybe you're better off using text indexing, see http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.2/static/textsearch.html

  2. As Denis has mentioned, you can index an expression in PostgreSQL, so you can index the same expression that you are searching on.

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