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How best to find the number of occurrences of a given array within a set of arrays (two-dimensional array) in python (with numpy)? This is (simplified) what I need expressed in python code:

patterns = numpy.array([[1, -1, 1, -1],
                   [1, 1, -1, 1],
                   [1, -1, 1, -1],
                   ...])
findInPatterns = numpy.array([1, -1, 1, -1])
numberOfOccurrences = findNumberOfOccurrences(needle=findInPatterns, haystack=patterns)
print(numberOfOccurrences) # should print e.g. 2

In reality, I need to find out how often each array can be found within the set. But the functionality described in the code above would already help me a lot on my way.

Now, I know I could use loops to do that but was wondering if there was a more efficient way to do this? Googling only let me to numpy.bincount which does exactly what I need but not for two-dimensional arrays and only for integers.

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1  
Don't use the word set. Set implies there can only be at most one of any given value. –  cmd May 6 '13 at 15:02
    
fair enough, just changed it. –  Daniel Weiss May 6 '13 at 15:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With an array of 1s and -1s, performance wise nothing is going to beat using np.dot: if (and only if) all items match then the dot product will add up to the number of items in the row. So you can do

>>> haystack = np.array([[1, -1, 1, -1],
...                      [1, 1, -1, 1],
...                      [1, -1, 1, -1]])
>>> needle = np.array([1, -1, 1, -1])
>>> haystack.dot(needle)
array([ 4, -2,  4])
>>> np.sum(haystack.dot(needle) == len(needle))
2

This is sort of a toy particular case of convolution based image matching, and you could rewrite it easily to look for patterns shorter than a full row, and even speed it up using FFTs.

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Thanks, this is exactly what I needed. I expanded it to allow for matching of multiple patterns at the same time using np.sum(haystack.dot(needle) == needle.shape[0], axis=0) with needle being of shape: numElementsPerPattern x numPatternsToMatch. –  Daniel Weiss May 6 '13 at 17:25
import numpy
A = numpy.array([[1, -1, 1, -1],
                 [1, 1, -1, 1],
                 [1, -1, 1, -1]])
b = numpy.array([1, -1, 1, -1])

print ((A == b).sum(axis=1) == b.size).sum()

This will do a row match, and we select and count the rows where all values match the pattern we are looking for. This requires that b has the same shape as A[0].

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I do think yours is the best answer for a general case, as my patterns only consist of 1s and -1s, however, Jaime's answer is much more performant in my case (my patterns are much larger than shown here). Thanks for your answer! –  Daniel Weiss May 6 '13 at 17:14

Sort of like @Hooked's answer, but slightly less verbose.

np.sum(np.equal(A, b).all(axis=1))
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How about:

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> c
[[1, -1, 1, -1], [1, -1, 1, 1], [2, 3, 4, 5], [1, -1, 1, -1]]
>>> Counter(list(tuple(i) for i in c))[tuple(c[0])]
2
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How about this? It doesn't use numpy, but it's simple enough and it works on matrices of any size/shape. The thinking is very simple: instead of comparing arrays, compare tuples (which are hashable and therefore easy to compare natively).

patterns = [[1, -1, 1, -1], 
            [1, 2, 3, 4], 
            [1, -1, 1, -1], 
            [1], 
            [], 
            [1, 1, 1, -1], 
            [1, -1, 1, -1]]
key = [1, -1, 1, -1]

def find_number_of_occurrences(needle, haystack):
    needle = tuple(needle)
    return len([straw for straw in haystack if tuple(straw) == needle])

print find_number_of_occurrences(key, patterns) # Prints 3

This just goes through haystack and builds a list comprehension out of the elements that match (the needles, if you like), and returns the length of this list. I'm not sure how it compares to doing this with numpy functionality in terms of efficiency, but it's certainly clean and comprehensible in the code.

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>>> import numpy
>>> haystack = numpy.array([[1, -1, 1, -1], [1, 1, -1, 1], [1, -1, 1, -1]])
>>> needle = numpy.array([1, -1, 1, -1])
>>> sum([numpy.equal(hay, needle).all() for hay in haystack])
2

Using numpy.equal() for comparison returns an array of True or False elements based on the comparison of inputs. all() checks truthiness of all elements in the array, then sum() on the list of boolean elements.

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