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This question already has an answer here:

I would like R to recognize one column as date. It is read as factor during the import, however, when I try to format with 'as.Date' and 'format' I only get NAs. I'm not sure where I'm going wrong.

> d = read.table("ByMonth.Year_54428.txt", header=T, sep=",")  
> str(d)  
'data.frame':   607 obs. of  2 variables:
 $ V1  : Factor w/ 607 levels "1950-12","1951-01",..: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
 $ Rain: int  100 56000 29293 37740 19649 41436 58067 51082 49629 62680 ...
> 
> 
> Date.form1 <- as.Date(d$V1, "%Y-%m")
> str(Date.form1)
 Date[1:607], format: NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA ...
> 
> Date.form2 = as.Date(as.character(d$V1), format="%Y-%m")
> str(Date.form2)
 Date[1:607], format: NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA ...
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marked as duplicate by David Arenburg r Nov 17 '14 at 18:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 12 down vote accepted

A year and a month do not make a date. You need a day also.

d <- data.frame(V1=c("1950-12","1951-01"))
as.Date(paste(d$V1,1,sep="-"),"%Y-%m-%d")
# [1] "1950-12-01" "1951-01-01"

You could also use the yearmon class in the zoo package.

library(zoo)
as.yearmon(d$V1)
# [1] "Dec 1950" "Jan 1951"
share|improve this answer
    
ah, thanks! I didn't know that as.Date needs a day as well because I got the data by using: ByMonth.Year = rowsum(out$rain_fall, format(out$Date,"%Y-%m")) which doesn't use a day. Thanks again! – KG12 May 7 '13 at 9:46
    
Of course as.Date needs a day. If I asked you, "what day were you born?", you wouldn't answer, "December 1950". As it says in the Value section of ?format, format converts its object to a character vector. – Joshua Ulrich May 7 '13 at 13:17

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