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I have the following method:

def GetMarketData(fr, cr, dct1, dct2, dict3, dct5, dct5):
    md = MarketData()

    q1 = Queue()
    q2 = Queue()
    q3 = Queue()
    q4 = Queue()
    q5 = Queue()
    q6 = Queue()
    q7 = Queue()
    p1 = Process(target=md.GetMD1, args=(q1,))
    p2 = Process(target=md.GetMD2, args=(q2,))
    p3 = Process(target=md.GetMD3, args=(q3,))
    p4 = Process(target=md.GetMD4, args=(q4,))
    p5 = Process(target=md.GetMD5, args=(q5,))
    p6 = Process(target=md.GetMD6, args=(q6,))
    p7 = Process(target=md.GetMD7, args=(q7,))
    p1.start()
    p2.start()
    p3.start()
    p4.start()
    p5.start()
    p6.start()
    p7.start()
    fr.append(q1.get())
    dct1.update(q2.get())
    dct2.update(q3.get())
    dct3.update(q4.get())
    cr.append(q5.get())
    dct4.update(q6.get())
    dct5.update(q7.get())
    p1.join()
    p2.join()
    p3.join()
    p4.join()
    p5.join()
    p6.join()
    p7.join()

    #print "good"

Is there a good way to rewrite this in a few line as possible. If I would need to open the same process over each queue that would not be a problem, but I need to run several different programs in parallel and do not see how to rewrite this in a fewer lines...

Thanks !!!

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what is the family of functions md.GetMD doing? Why are there 7 of them? –  mgilson May 6 '13 at 15:58
    
they extract Market Data using different keys, methods are very different but can be run in parallel –  ilyaw77 May 6 '13 at 16:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As a first simplification, I'd use lists:

def GetMarketData(fr, cr, dct1, dct2, dict3, dct5, dct5):
    md = MarketData()

    ques = [Queue() for _ in range(7)]
    procs = [Process(target=getattr(md,'GetMD%d'%(i),args=(q,)) 
             for i,q in enumerate(ques,1)]
    for p in procs:
        p.start()

    fr.append(ques[0].get())
    dct1.update(ques[1].get())
    dct2.update(ques[2].get())
    dct3.update(ques[3].get())
    cr.append(ques[4].get())
    dct4.update(ques[5].get())
    dct5.update(ques[6].get())

    for p in procs:
        p.join()
share|improve this answer
    
the q[x] lines should be replaced by que[x] or rename your que variable to q ;) –  dweeves May 6 '13 at 16:08
    
@dweeves -- thanks. I corrected a couple other minor mistakes while I was at it. –  mgilson May 6 '13 at 16:11
    
What's a "que"? Shouldn't that variable be called "queues"? And "p" should be "processes"... –  boxed May 6 '13 at 16:13
    
@boxed -- Sure, OP can name the variables whatever is fitting. I was just trying to keep the names short enough that it's not tedious to type again and again and to keep the lines slightly shorter ... –  mgilson May 6 '13 at 16:16
    
i think and even shorter solution can be found using dictionary (or tuple list) for storing what operation/target is to be done on each queue . however this would complicate a bit the understanding of the code. –  dweeves May 6 '13 at 16:18

Instead of:

q1 = Queue()
q2 = Queue()
q3 = Queue()
q4 = Queue()
q5 = Queue()
q6 = Queue()
q7 = Queue()

You can instead write:

queues = [Queue() for i in xrange(7)]

Now your queues are queues[0] through queues[6]. You can do the same thing with your processes:

processes = [Process(target=getattr("md.GetMD%d" % (i+1)), args=(queues[i],))
             for i in xrange(7)]

And then start them using a loop:

for process in processes:
    process.start()

Similarly for joining later:

for process in processes:
    process.join()

That leaves this section:

fr.append(q1.get())
dct1.update(q2.get())
dct2.update(q3.get())
dct3.update(q4.get())
cr.append(q5.get())
dct4.update(q6.get())
dct5.update(q7.get())

Which could be loopified in a similar manner just by accepting any number of arguments in your function rather than named arguments; then we can loop over the arguments:

for queue, result_dict in zip(queues, result_dicts):
    result_dict.update(queue.get())

Then we can also just make it so we pass in any number of dictionaries, so rather than using the magic number of 7 we just create as many queues and processes as arguments. The function doesn't need to know that some dictionaries are different from others because in fact they are all processed identically anyway.

Putting it together, we get:

def GetMarketData(*result_dicts):

    queues = [Queue() for item in result_dicts]

    processes = [Process(target=getattr("md.GetMD%d" % (i+1)), args=(queues[i],))
                 for i in xrange(len(result_dicts))]

    for process in processes:
        process.start()

    for queue, result_dict in zip(queues, result_dicts):
        result_dict.update(queue.get())

    for process in processes:
        process.join()

(Unrelated note: I've not done much with multiprocessing, but wouldn't you want to join the processes before reading from the queues, to make sure the results in the queues are complete?)

share|improve this answer
    
How did you manage to transform the .update calls to .append calls? –  mgilson May 6 '13 at 16:13
    
That's an error, sorry. Fixing –  kindall May 6 '13 at 16:14
    
thanks a lot for a very detailed response kindall !!! –  ilyaw77 May 6 '13 at 16:28

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