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I figured out how to write this query when I am looking for 2 relationships, but not sure how to add more relationships to the query.

Assume you have a book club database with 'reader' and 'book' as nodes. The 'book' nodes have a 'genre' attribute (to define that the book is a Fiction, Non-Fiction, Biography, Reference, etc.) There is a Relationship "HasRead" between 'reader' nodes and 'book' nodes where someone has read a particular book.

If I want to find readers that have read both Fiction AND Non-Fiction books, I could execute this Cypher query:

Start b1=node:MyBookIndex('Genre:Fiction'), 
      b2=node:MyBookIndex('Genre:Non-Fiction')
Match b1-[:HadRead]-r-[:HasRead]-b2
Return r.ReaderName

The key to the above query is the Match clause that has the two book aliases feeding into the r alias for the 'reader' nodes.

Question: How would I write the query to find users that have read Fiction AND Non-Fiction AND Reference books? I'm stuck with how you would write the Match clause when you have more than 2 things you are looking for.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can have multiple line specified in a single MATCH clause, separated by commas. For example, the following two MATCH clauses are semantically equivalent (and will be evaluated identically by the engine):

//these mean the same thing!
match a--b--c
match a--b, b--c

You can have any number of these matches. So, plugging that into your query, you get this:

start b1=node:MyBookIndex('Genre:Fiction'), 
      b2=node:MyBookIndex('Genre:Non-Fiction'),
      b3=node:MyBookIndex('Genre:Reference')
match b1-[:HasRead]-r,
      b2-[:HasRead]-r,
      b3-[:HasRead]-r
return r.ReaderName
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That worked like a charm! –  Dave Michener May 7 '13 at 17:11

You can user cypher 'with' clause -

start b1=node:MyBookIndex('Genre:Fiction'), 
      b2=node:MyBookIndex('Genre:Non-Fiction'),
      b3=node:MyBookIndex('Genre:Reference')
match b1-[:HasRead]-r-[:HasRead]-b2
with b3, r
match b3-[:HasRead]-r
return r.ReaderName
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One problem with using WITH in this case is that you're forcing neo4j to completely enumerate the first batch of rs before continuing to filter out the ones that don't have a relationship to b3. The performance may or may not be important in this particular case, but in general it is better to use multiple MATCHes. –  ean5533 May 6 '13 at 17:26
    
@ean5533 not really sure whether performance will be impacted, don't know how neo4j processes this under the hood, but yes using multiple matches definitely looks cleaner. +1 ! –  Gopi May 6 '13 at 17:31
    
I have read about the WITH clause elsewhere and the powerful flexibility it offers similar to the UNIX pipe command. For my purpose here though, I am going to stick with @Gopi's suggestion as I find it a more readable/easier to understand syntax. –  Dave Michener May 7 '13 at 17:13

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