Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Situation:

url: http://mydomain.com/test.html#somehash

test script:

$(document).ready(function () {
    console.log("page initiated");
    if (window.location.hash) {
        console.log("hash changed (if-statement)");
    }

    $(window).on("hashchange", function () {
        console.log("hash changed (on statement)");
    });

});

The script can also be found on fiddle, but the environment is not suitable to display the behavior.

The problem I get is when I click on the browser addressbar and hit enter without any changes.

  1. When the browser url has a hashtag, the page is not re-initiated. document.ready does not get fired and I do not get any console messages.

  2. When the browser url does not have a hashtag, the page does get re-initiated and document.ready is fired.

Does anybody have an explanation for this behavior and can it be caught so that in situation 1 the page does get reloaded? Is there documentation somewhere, because I can't seem to find any?

share|improve this question
2  
This is desired behaviour. If your URL contains a hash string, it's not supposed to initiate a full page refresh. –  meagar May 6 '13 at 17:30
    
I was kind of struck. Is this documented somewhere? Is there a specific reason to render this as desired behavior? When I click the "refresh" button on the browser menu, I have a normal refresh. –  Daniel May 6 '13 at 17:38
1  
Adding a hash to a URL indicates you mean to navigate within the page, not navigate to a new page. Clicking the "refresh" button indicates you want to re-request the document. Pressing enter on the URL bar and clicking refresh are very different things. –  meagar May 6 '13 at 17:40
    
@meager - thanks for your input. I suppose the "navigation inside the page" clears it up for me. Especially when doing my programming i may refresh with the above scenario expecting a page refresh. Good to be aware of this. –  Daniel May 6 '13 at 17:52
    
@meager - could you add an answer or tell me otherwise how I can close this question as answered? –  Daniel Mar 4 '14 at 23:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is desired behaviour. If your URL contains a hash string, it's not supposed to initiate a full page refresh.

Adding a hash to a URL indicates you mean to navigate within the page, not navigate to a new page. Clicking the "refresh" button indicates you want to re-request the document. Pressing enter on the URL bar and clicking refresh are very different things.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @meager ;-) –  Daniel Mar 5 '14 at 4:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.