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First, please pardon my rusty Perl. I'm trying to modify Bugzilla's "whine.pl" to generate lists of bugs sorted by severity.

So it gives me an array of hash references. Each hash contains a bunch of information about a particular bug (id, assignee, severity, etc). I want to sort the array by severity. What's the best way to do this?

I'd come up with a couple of possibilities. One is to create five arrays (one for each level of severity), then loop over the the array and push the hash refs into the appropriate severity level array. After this, I could reassemble them and replace the original array with the sorted one.

Another way that my friend came up with would be to assign the severity levels (stored as text in the hashes) to some nubmers, and cmp them. Maybe something like this?

sub getVal {
    my $entry = $_[0];
    %lookup = ( "critical" => 0, ... );
    return $lookup(entry("bug_severity"));
}
@sorted = sort { getVal($a) <=> getVal($b) } @unsorted;
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Incidentally, you do not have an array of hashes but an array of references to anonymous hashes. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 28 '09 at 22:44
    
Thanks, Sinan. I've fixed the title. –  Allan Anderson Oct 28 '09 at 22:50
1  
@grahzny: thanks for stirring up a great discussion. It was a pretty quiet day so far :) –  Ether Oct 28 '09 at 23:08
1  
Now, I am looking at the source for whine.pl and it seems to be getting these from an SQL database. Isn't it better to use the appropriate SELECT query to get already sorted bugs out of the database? –  Sinan Ünür Oct 28 '09 at 23:42
    
You're absolutely right, Sinan; however, the queries it uses are user-created "saved searches" stored in Bugzilla's db. I didn't see a way to do this in the UI. Maybe we can add this to Bugzilla, but I thought I'd start small and use this helper script. –  Allan Anderson Oct 29 '09 at 0:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I like your proposed solution:

my %sevs = (critical => 0, high => 1, ...);
my @sorted = sort { $sevs{$a->{bug_severity}} <=> $sevs{$b->{bug_severity}} } @unsorted
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, tster; it's nice to hear that I'm on the right path, and it's useful to see it expressed differently. –  Allan Anderson Oct 28 '09 at 22:39
    
The other solutions are very educational; I think that this simple one is the best choice for my needs. –  Allan Anderson Oct 29 '09 at 0:24

To avoid calling getVal more times than necessary, you can use "decorate, sort, undecorate". Decorate is getting the information you actually care about for the sort:

my @decorated = map { [ $_, getVal($_) ] } @unsorted;

Then sort the decorated list:

my @sortedDecorate = sort { $a->[1] <=> $b->[1] } @decorated;

Then get the original information back (undecorate):

my @sorted = map { $_->[0] } @sortedDecorate;

Or the more Perl-ish way to do it:

@sorted = map { $_->[0] }
          sort { $a->[1] <=> $b->[1] }
          map { [ $_, getVal($_) ] } @unsorted;
share|improve this answer
    
And interesting idea. I like. (but don't do the last way, perl is already hard enough to understand!) –  tster Oct 28 '09 at 22:17
4  
This is indeed the Schwartzian Transform. Named for me, but not by me. –  Randal Schwartz Oct 28 '09 at 22:58
    
I remember you mentioning that when teaching a perl class I was in, Randal. It still intrigues me that the community latched onto that term instead of the general decorate-sort-undecorate. :) –  jamessan Oct 28 '09 at 23:08
    
@Sinan, I'm not saying don't do this. I'm saying don't make it a one-liner because it makes it hard to understand. The one liner is not more efficient than breaking it into 3 easy to understand and read lines. –  tster Oct 29 '09 at 0:48

You can use the Schwartzian Transform:

my @sorted = map  { $_->[1] }
             sort { $a->[0] <=> $b->[0] }
             map  { [ $lookup{$_->{bug_severity}, $_ ] } 
             @unsorted;

Explanation:

map  { [ $lookup{$_->{bug_severity}, $_ ] } @unsorted;

maps each bug to an array reference whose first element is the numerical bug severity from the lookup table. Using the Schwartzian Transform, you look up the value only once for each bug in @unsorted.

Then,

sort { $a->[0] <=> $b->[0] }

sorts that array by the first element. Finally,

@sorted = map  { $_->[1] }

pulls out the original bugs from the array returned by sort.

There is really no need for getval when all it's doing is a hash lookup.

For automatically generating efficient sorters, CPAN module Sort::Maker is excellent:

use strict; use warnings;

use Sort::Maker;

my @bugs = (
    { name => 'bar', bug_severity => 'severe' },
    { name => 'baz', bug_severity => 'noncritical' },
    { name => 'foo', bug_severity => 'critical' },
);

my $sorter = make_sorter('ST',
    name      => 'severity_sorter',
    init_code => 'my %lookup = (
                     critical => 0,
                     severe => 1,
                     noncritical => -1 );',
    number    => [ code => '$lookup{$_->{bug_severity}}' ],
);

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper $_ for severity_sorter( @bugs );

Output:

$VAR1 = {
          'name' => 'baz',
          'bug_severity' => 'noncritical'
        };
$VAR1 = {
          'name' => 'foo',
          'bug_severity' => 'critical'
        };
$VAR1 = {
          'name' => 'bar',
          'bug_severity' => 'severe'
        };

Note that the number of lookups that need to be made when using the naive method depends on the number of elements in @unsorted. We can count them using the simple program:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my ($n_elements) = @ARGV;

my @keys = qw(a b c);
my %lookup = map { $keys[$_-1] => $_ } 1 .. @keys;

my @unsorted = map { $keys[rand 3] } 1 .. $n_elements;

my $n_lookups;

my @sorted = sort {
    $n_lookups += 2;
    $lookup{$a} <=> $lookup{$b}
} @unsorted;

print "It took $n_lookups lookups to sort $n_elements elements\n";

Output:

C:\Temp> tzt 10
It took 38 lookups to sort 10 elements

C:\Temp> tzt 100
It took 978 lookups to sort 100 elements

C:\Temp> tzt 1000
It took 10916 lookups to sort 1000 elements

C:\Temp> tzt 10000
It took 113000 lookups to sort 10000 elements

Therefore, one would need more information to decide whether the naive sort or using the Schwartzian Transform is the appropriate solution.

And here is a simple benchmark which seems to agree with @Ether's argument:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Benchmark qw( cmpthese );

my ($n_elements) = @ARGV;

my @keys = qw(foo bar baz);
my %lookup = map { $keys[$_] => $_ } 0 .. $#keys;

my @unsorted = map { {v => $keys[rand 3]} } 1 .. $n_elements;

cmpthese(-1, {
    naive => sub {
        my @sorted = sort {
            $lookup{$a->{v}} <=> $lookup{$b->{v}}
        } @unsorted;
    },
    schwartzian => sub {
        my @sorted = map  { $_->[1] }
                     sort { $a->[0] <=> $b->[0] }
                     map  { [$lookup{$_->{v}}, $_] }
                     @unsorted;
    }
});

Output:

C:\Temp> tzt 10
               Rate schwartzian       naive
schwartzian 18842/s          --        -29%
naive       26357/s         40%          --

C:\Temp> tzt 100
              Rate       naive schwartzian
naive       1365/s          --        -11%
schwartzian 1532/s         12%          --

C:\Temp> tzt 1000
             Rate       naive schwartzian
naive       121/s          --        -11%
schwartzian 135/s         12%          --
share|improve this answer
1  
Jamessan already posted this, and it is almost impossible to understand without requiring major effort. –  tster Oct 28 '09 at 22:21
2  
Another well-explicated example :) thank you for the details. I've got lots to experiment with here. –  Allan Anderson Oct 28 '09 at 22:44

You could use a lookup table to determine the ordering of the bugzilla severities, like this (using sample data to illustrate):

use strict; use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my @bugInfo = (
                { id => 1,
                  assignee => 'Bob',
                  severity => 'HIGH'
                },
                { id => 2,
                  assignee => 'Anna',
                  severity => 'LOW'
                },
                { id => 3,
                  assignee => 'Carl',
                  severity => 'EXTREME'
                },
              );
my %severity_ordering = (
    EXTREME => 0,
    HIGH => 1,
    MEDIUM => 2,
    LOW => 3,
);
sub byseverity
{
    $severity_ordering{$a->{severity}} <=> $severity_ordering{$b->{severity}}
}

my @sortedBugs = sort byseverity @bugInfo;
print Dumper(\@sortedBugs);

yields:

$VAR1 = [
          {
            'assignee' => 'Carl',
            'id' => 3,
            'severity' => 'EXTREME'
          },
          {
            'assignee' => 'Bob',
            'id' => 1,
            'severity' => 'HIGH'
          },
          {
            'assignee' => 'Anna',
            'id' => 2,
            'severity' => 'LOW'
          }
        ];
share|improve this answer
    
...which is pretty much what you posted in your question (doh, didn't read it closely enough), as well as what tster said. So yes, I agree it's the best solution. :) –  Ether Oct 28 '09 at 22:29
1  
I appreciate having my fuzzy idea spelled out for me; thank you for the detailed example that saves me some "argh, how does Perl do that again?" time. –  Allan Anderson Oct 28 '09 at 22:38
    
There's a lookup for every entry in the table being sorted, but 1. the lookup table is very short (only ~5 entries for the bugzilla example), and 2. in a Schwartzian transform you have to process every entry in the input data multiple times, which in this scenario is going to be of roughly equivalent expense. Unless I have missed something, a transform only pays off if the input data is relatively small compared to the table being used to determine sort order, and you also have to factor in the complexity of the code (simpler code is easier to debug than complex code). –  Ether Oct 28 '09 at 22:45
    
@Sinan, ok fair enough. However, the real gains from using a transform are if the computation costs of executing the sort method n log(n) times exceeds the time required for the two map calls. The example in the UnixReview article involved a split; in the OP's example the data is already nicely parsable as a clean data structure. So I think in this case I think the transform won't buy us anything, even for a really huge list of bugs to process. –  Ether Oct 28 '09 at 23:07

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