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I have a heading (<h1>) that has a sort of tagline below (I used a <small> tag and set the font-size to a certain percent so it lines up perfectly when I change the font-size of the heading for smaller screens. I'm using ems, if that matters.

At first, the <small> tag sits nicely underneath the main heading, but I realized I forgot the doctype (html5) somehow... so when it was corrected, the spacing was all wrong.

Here's my code:

HTML:

    <h1 class="banner">Justin Wilson<br /><small>WEB + GRAPHIC DESIGNER</small></h1>

CSS:

h1.banner {
text-align: center;
display: block;
font-family: 'arvil';
font-size: 6.5em;
color: #94babd; }

h1.banner > small {
font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
font-size: 27%;
color: #888;
letter-spacing: 1px;
font-weight: 100; }

Here's the before and after:

Before and after doctype declaration

I have searched through StackOverflow, but not sure how to proceed. I've read that a <br /> tag simply line breaks, but it inherits the line-spacing, and line-spacing: (value) does not work, nor do margins or padding.

What I need is a simple, cross-browser solution. I used Chrome for the screenshot. Support for IE6-7 not needed, IE8 would be nice.

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1  
Why not using <h2> or others for the 2nd row? –  JEES May 6 '13 at 18:11
    
Well, it's part of the main heading, my name and title. The title is the "tagline" in a way. –  Justin W May 6 '13 at 18:32
2  
@JEES - The HTML5 spec specifically says not to do that. –  Alohci May 6 '13 at 18:35
1  
@JEES - hgroup is now obsolete in HTML5. –  Alohci May 6 '13 at 18:56
1  
@Alohci, you have a link? [html5semantic] updated April,3 (caniuse.com/#feat=html5semantic) –  JEES May 6 '13 at 18:59
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7 Answers

You need to control the line-height css property (see W3 Schools) to make sure all browsers set the same height for each line.

It's actually advisable to do this to pretty much all elements containing text, which is why most people use CSS resets for production, which sets a default line-height across all elements.

In this case, the <span> and <h1> will likely have different line heights.

I'm sure the <br /> tag is doing nothing wrong, unless you've altered its properties with CSS which I would not advise.

There's also a shorthand version in case you're setting other font properties for the same element(s):

font: <font weight> <font size>/<line height> <font face>;

For example:

font: bold 12px/18px sans-serif;

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip. I'm using Normalize, but I guess there isn't anything that declares a default line-height. Any suggestion on a more thorough reset? I suppose I can just add some in.. –  Justin W May 6 '13 at 18:34
    
The CSS reset discussion has been around for years. I can't provide you with a simple solution here that would not spark a big discussion on CSS resets. You can check out cssreset.com for current popular CSS reset methods. As you use CSS more you will likely end up using your own CSS reset based on your needs and style anyway. –  Robbert May 6 '13 at 21:28
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Drop the <br /> and set the display of the <small> element to block.

http://cssdeck.com/labs/uoqfo4xw

<h1 class="banner">Justin Wilson <small>WEB + GRAPHIC DESIGNER</small></h1>

h1.banner {
text-align: center;
display: block;
font-family: 'arvil';
font-size: 6.5em;
color: #94babd; }

h1.banner > small {
font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
font-size: 27%;
color: #888;
letter-spacing: 1px;
font-weight: 100;
display: block; }
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent. This does work, as does using a <header> tag, with a heading and paragraph tag (containing the tagline). –  Justin W May 6 '13 at 19:59
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The problem is caused by the default line height for the heading element. The default depends on the browser and on the font, but it tends to be about 1.1 to 1.3 times the font size. In any case, with a very large font size set, this creates a problem, because the line height value also sets the height of the second line. By CSS specifications, for a block element, line-height sets the minimum height of line boxes.

There are various ways around this. Setting display: block on the small element is one way, since then its default line height will be determined according to its own font size. Another way is to set a line height that is considerably smaller than the font size, e.g.

h1.banner { line-height: 0.5; }
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An alternative is to set the span to display: block; and then adjust the line-height of the <h2> tag.

I would do this, instead of using a <br /> tag.

share|improve this answer
    
True, but then there's no need in using a <span> either. Justin could just use a block element instead, like a <div> or an <h2> as suggested. Though I'd prefer using a <div> because an <h2> would signify a sub-chapter, which it is not. –  Robbert May 6 '13 at 18:30
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ultimately the answer that works as the best solution is found here (3rd example):

http://www.w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/common-idioms.html#sub-head

@cimmanon posted a very helpful solution, but to be safe, I'll stick with what Steve Faulkner said about this being a more semantic and SEO-friendly solution over using an <h1> tag and <h2> tag for a subheading, or inline elements inside a heading tag, regardless of styling.

Here's the solution:

HTML:

  <header>
    <h1 class="banner">Justin Wilson</h1>
    <p>WEB + GRAPHIC DESIGNER</p>
  </header>

CSS:

  h1.banner {
  text-align: center;
  display: block;
  font-family: 'arvil';
  font-size: 6.5em;
  color: #94babd;
  font-weight: normal;
  margin: 1em 0 0 0;/*purely for display purposes, really*/ }

  header > p {font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif;
  font-size: 1.75em;
  color: #888;
  letter-spacing: 1px;
  font-weight: 100;
  text-align: center;
  margin:0;  }

And the live demo (might not look good to you without the free Arvil font, from Lost Fonts).

http://cssdeck.com/labs/xysgkffs

Thanks for all the answers thus far.

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I agree with @JEES - this should really be an h1 and a separate h2, not a small inside an h1 with a br for the line break. Semantic markup is always easier to work with.

share|improve this answer
    
I dunno, this seems semantic to me, seeing as it's a tagline, and part of the website's main heading. –  Justin W May 6 '13 at 18:29
1  
Not an answer but a comment. –  Jukka K. Korpela May 6 '13 at 19:40
    
@JukkaK.Korpela - it's a viable solution to OP's problem, and therefor an answer. –  Adrian May 6 '13 at 19:44
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UPDATED....

Change <small> to <p> in HTML and CSS and add line to the h1.banner > p

margin: 0 auto;

FIDDLE

share|improve this answer
    
If you widen the view on that fiddle, or any screen, the tagline doesn't line up. It sticks to an absolute position, relative to the viewport. –  Justin W May 6 '13 at 19:00
    
Didn't say it's the good way, I wouldn't do it this way if it was me –  JEES May 6 '13 at 19:06
    
So... why did you suggest doing it this way, then..? –  Justin W May 6 '13 at 19:18
    
Check my updated answer. –  JEES May 6 '13 at 19:18
3  
p inside h1 is invalid markup. –  Jukka K. Korpela May 6 '13 at 19:39
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