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It seems like the documentation around Roslyn is a bit lacking? I am not able to find good comprehensive documentation.

What I am trying to do essentially is copy the public surface of an existing API (.dll) into a new assembly (need to create source code .cs files!) and at the same time make a variety of tranformations to the resulting code (think making wrapper classes).

Would really appreciate any help in how I can use Rolsyn to load the initial SyntaxTree from an existing assembly and how to do those basic tranforms (for example exclude internal classes etc)

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A syntax tree is not something that comes from an assembly; a syntax tree comes from syntax -- from source code. Roslyn is a compiler; it sounds like you want a decompiler, at least for the first stage. –  Eric Lippert May 6 '13 at 19:26
    
Good point. Let's say i have the solution of the original API. What would be the easiest way to auto-generate my own solution that contains source for the public surface of the original one? If Roslyn doesn't help me then what could i use to avoid creating all the source files manually using StringBuilders? I could use the Workspace API from Roslyn to Clone the original solution and make my changes to it? –  atomaras May 6 '13 at 19:44
    
@atomaras Could you explain why do you want to do that? –  svick May 6 '13 at 19:46
    
@svick I have 3 different C# APIs (Xamarin bindings for iOS, Android and WinPhone). I want to make a absolute copy of the WinPhone one and wrap the iOS and Android ones under it so i can provide the same coding experience on all. For example i want the same AwesomeClass to exist on all and have it be implemented differently on each binding. Goal = code reuse –  atomaras May 6 '13 at 19:53
    
@atomaras That sounds more like what you want is to extract interfaces from your current code and then implement them in the new code. A tool like ReSharper can help you with that. –  svick May 6 '13 at 20:00

2 Answers 2

In the current Roslyn CTP there is a Roslyn.Services.MetadataAsSource namespace which can be used to convert an type's public interface to source code. This is what we implement the F12 "metadata as source" feature with. Now, it generates only a shell of source code which won't actually compile, so you'd have to use further APIs to munge the syntax tree into what you want. Alternatively, you could use the Roslyn.Services.CodeGeneration namespace to generate source from these symbols automatically. I should warn the MetadataAsSource namespace may go away in future versions of the API.

You can import symbols from metadata by creating an otherwise empty compilation with the metadata references you care about added, and then from that compilation browsing the type hierarchy from GlobalNamespace property, or calling Compilation.GetReferencedAssemblySymbol() and then digging through that. This is actually far better than using reflection, since it'll properly express the symbol model from the "C# perspective" instead of the "CLR perspective" -- reflection won't give you information for uses of dynamic, some default parameter values, etc.

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Thanx for this answer Jason. I have managed to get so far but am still left scratching my head trying to find my way through the Roslyn API. –  atomaras May 6 '13 at 21:55
    
As far as the Roslyn.Services.MetadataAsSource is concerned the only public thing is the IMetadataAsSourceService interface. I don't see a way i can use it. –  atomaras May 6 '13 at 23:30
    
Are you opening a workspace with Workspace.LoadSolution? –  Jason Malinowski May 6 '13 at 23:43
    
Jason sure yes. I need to open the original API solution, "reflect" on it and generate a brand new one in a different folder. –  atomaras May 7 '13 at 0:06
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I had forgotten that we'd shipped this feature. Nice! –  Eric Lippert May 7 '13 at 17:08

It seems like the documentation around Roslyn is a bit lacking? I am not able to find good comprehensive documentation.

Roslyn is at the Community Technology Preview stage, so it's not surprising that its documentation is lacking. You can find some sources at Roslyn API documentation.

What I am trying to do essentially is copy the public surface of an existing API (.dll) into a new assembly (need to create source code .cs files!) and at the same time make a variety of transformations to the resulting code (think making wrapper classes).

Working with assemblies this way is not something Roslyn can do. But it seems for what you want, reflection for reading the assembly combined with Roslyn for writing the new code would work. But you would need to write all the code to translate from the reflection model to Roslyn's model (e.g. TypeTypeDeclarationSyntax, MethodInfoMethodDeclarationSyntax, etc.).

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That sounds good but what's the easiest way to do it? Does the fact that i have the original solution available help in staying within Roslyn the whole way? Will i be covered just using the Workspace API to do everything i want? –  atomaras May 6 '13 at 19:56
    
You can still import public surface metadata via Roslyn, which would be preferable to using reflection in this case. –  Jason Malinowski May 6 '13 at 19:58
    
@JasonMalinowski Could you be more specific? For example, how would I get all public types from some assembly using Roslyn? –  svick May 6 '13 at 20:01
    
@atomaras If you have the solution, then I think starting from that would be easier. Just change the namespace and remove all method bodies (or something like that). –  svick May 6 '13 at 20:03
    
@svick: see my answer, but you can still create a compilation pointing to those references, and then go browse the types from them. –  Jason Malinowski May 6 '13 at 20:09

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