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The following piece of code produces the error:

can't read "n": no such variable
    while executing
"$ns duplex-link $n$i $n([expr ($i+1)%120]) 1Mb 10ms DropTail"
    ("for" body line 2)
    invoked from within
"for {set i 7} {$i < 120} {incr i} {
      $ns duplex-link $n$i $n([expr ($i+1)%120]) 1Mb 10ms DropTail
}"
    (file "multicast.tcl" line 44)

it seems $n$i is not evaluated to the required format of $n7 etc. Any help in the solution is much appreciated.

for {set i 0} {$i < 120} {incr i} {
set n$i "[$ns node]"
global n$i
}

# Create links
$ns duplex-link $n0 $n1 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $n0 $n2 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $n2 $n3 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $n2 $n4 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $n1 $n7 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $n1 $n5 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $n4 $n6 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail

#create the rest of the links
for {set i 7} {$i < 120} {incr i} {
      $ns duplex-link $n$i $n([expr ($i+1)%120]) 1Mb 10ms DropTail
}
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Tcl's $ syntax does not parse non-alphanumeric variable names (with a few exceptions I'll come to in a moment) so it stops trying to parse the first part of $n$i after the n. This is a limitation of the parser but Tcl itself allows almost anything in.

One of those exceptions is that :: namespace separators are allowed too, and another is that you can put a complex literal variable name in {braces}, like ${n$i}. That's not helpful here though, as you can't substitute variables into variable names that way.

What you should do

Use an array. The form $somename(stuff-to-do-an-index) allows a full range of substitutions in the stuff-to-do-an-index, except for some restrictions on parentheses that hardly ever matter.

global ni;  # <-- you might not need this!
for {set i 0} {$i < 120} {incr i} {
    set ni($i) "[$ns node]"
}

# Create links
$ns duplex-link $ni(0) $ni(1) 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $ni(0) $ni(2) 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $ni(2) $ni(3) 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $ni(2) $ni(4) 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $ni(1) $ni(7) 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $ni(1) $ni(5) 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $ni(4) $ni(6) 1.5Mb 10ms DropTail

#create the rest of the links
for {set i 7} {$i < 120} {incr i} {
    $ns duplex-link $ni($i) $n([expr ($i+1)%120]) 1Mb 10ms DropTail
}

Other alternatives

You can use the one-argument version of set to read from variables (it's documented, but a little obscure to those new to Tcl).

$ns duplex-link [set n$i] $n([expr ($i+1)%120]) 1Mb 10ms DropTail

You can also use upvar 0 to make an alias to the variable which you can then manipulate normally:

upvar 0 n$i myAlias
$ns duplex-link $myAlias $n([expr ($i+1)%120]) 1Mb 10ms DropTail

Even more ugly would be this construction with subst:

$ns duplex-link [subst "\$n$i"] $n([expr ($i+1)%120]) 1Mb 10ms DropTail

After that, it gets really nasty with eval and return -level 0 (which is actually efficient: strange but true!) and all sorts of stuff like that, but really don't go that way. Arrays are perfect for this sort of thing, really.

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you again? :) thanks. works like a charm.. –  Monty Swanson May 7 '13 at 8:04
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For clarity, I would introduce some temp vars:

for {set i 7} {$i < 120} {incr i} {
      set node1 n$i
      set node2 n[expr {($i + 1)%120}]
      $ns duplex-link [set $node1] [set $node2] 1Mb 10ms DropTail
}

An invocation of set with only a single arg (the name of a var) returns the value of that variable.

Alternatively, you could use the subst command:

for {set i 7} {$i < 120} {incr i} {
      set node1 n$i
      set node2 n[expr {($i + 1)%120}]
      $ns duplex-link [subst $$node1] [subst $$node2] 1Mb 10ms DropTail
}
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Actually, for clarity it is best to go with Donal's solution. It also has the added benefit of making it easier to list all of the defined elements for debugging and diagnostic purposes, and makes it much more clean if you end up breaking this out into procs and need to pass it in as an argument. –  ramanman May 6 '13 at 22:37
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