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I want to express the following formula with Linq

Hellinger distance formula

I have the following function

private double Calc(IEnumerable<Frequency> recording, IEnumerable<Frequency> reading)
{
}

where the Frequency is :

public class Frequency
{
  public double Probability { get; set; } //which are p's and q's in the formula
  public int Strength { get; set; } //the i's i the formula 
}

An example call to the function is

public void Caller(){
   IEnumerable<Frequency> recording = new List<Frequency>
                                            {
                                               new Frequency {Strength = 32, Probability = 0.2}, //p32 = 0.2
                                               new Frequency {Strength = 33, Probability = 0.2}, //p33 = 0.2
                                               new Frequency {Strength = 34, Probability = 0.2}, //p34 = 0.2
                                               new Frequency {Strength = 35, Probability = 0.2}, //...
                                               new Frequency {Strength = 41, Probability = 0.2} //...
                                            };

   IEnumerable<Frequency> reading = new List<Frequency>
                                            {
                                               new Frequency {Strength = 34, Probability = 0.2}, //q34 = 0.2
                                               new Frequency {Strength = 35, Probability = 0.2},  //q35 = 0.2
                                               new Frequency {Strength = 36, Probability = 0.2},
                                               new Frequency {Strength = 37, Probability = 0.2},
                                               new Frequency {Strength = 80, Probability = 0.2},
                                            };
   Calc(reading, recordig);
}

For example, new Frequency {Strength = 32, Probability = 0.2}, means that p32 = 0.2 in the Hellinger formula.

k will be 100 in the formula, if an element does not exists in the collection it will have value 0. For example recording does only have values for i = 32,33, 34,35,41 therefore for other values in 1-100 pi will be zero.

My first implementation is

  private double Calc(IEnumerable<Frequency> recording, IEnumerable<Frequency> reading)
  {
     double result = 0;

     foreach (var i in Enumerable.Range(1,100))
     {
        var recStr = recording.FirstOrDefault(a => a.Strength == i);
        var readStr = reading.FirstOrDefault(a => a.Strength == i);
        var recVal = recStr == null ? 0 : recStr.Probability;
        var readVal = readStr == null ? 0 : readStr.Probability;

        result += Math.Pow(Math.Sqrt(recVal) - Math.Sqrt(readVal), 2);
     }

     result = Math.Sqrt(result/2);
     return result;
  }

which is neither efficient nor elegant. I feel like the solution could be improved but i could not think a better way.

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I'm still learning LINQ expressions, and a good way to be provided insight on the fly is to use the Resharper VS extension (you can do a 30 day trial). This tool offers more concise alternatives to statements that could I either benefit from using LINQ expressions or already do, but don't do so as elegantly as possible. Just a thought for this and future endeavors! –  Jake Smith May 6 '13 at 22:22
4  
Maybe make a hash map from strength to frequency, then you have O(1) key lookups instead of O(n) list scans for strength. –  Patashu May 6 '13 at 22:32
    
Elegance is in the eye of the beholder but your current code does look maintainable, which I'd say is more important. LINQ is great but it can be misused in terms of code readability and maintainability. There's nothing wrong with using a loop! –  appclay May 6 '13 at 23:01
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2 Answers

Resharper turns your function into this :

double result = (from i in Enumerable.Range(1, 100) 
                 let recStr = recording.FirstOrDefault(a => a.Strength == i) 
                 let readStr = reading.FirstOrDefault(a => a.Strength == i) 
                 let recVal = recStr == null ? 0 : recStr.Probability 
                 let readVal = readStr == null ? 0 : readStr.Probability 
                 select Math.Pow(Math.Sqrt(recVal) - Math.Sqrt(readVal), 2)).Sum();


return Math.Sqrt(result / 2);

As Patashu said, you can use a Dictionary<int, Frequency> to get O(1) lookup time :

private double Calc(Dictionary<int, Frequency> recording, Dictionary<int, Frequency> reading)
{
    double result = (from i in Enumerable.Range(1, 100) 
                     let recVal = recording.ContainsKey(i) ? 0 : recording[i].Probability 
                     let readVal = reading.ContainsKey(i) ? 0 : reading[i].Probability 
                     select Math.Pow(Math.Sqrt(recVal) - Math.Sqrt(readVal), 2)).Sum();

    return Math.Sqrt(result / 2);
}
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This question is complicated by the fact that the lists are sparse (we don't have probabilities for all readings). So, first we solve that problem:

public static IEnumerable<Frequency> FillHoles(this IEnumerable<Frequency> src, int start, int end) {
    IEnumerable<int> range = Enumerable.Range(start, end-start+1);
    var result = from num in range
                 join _freq in src on num equals _freq.Strength into g
                 from freq in g.DefaultIfEmpty(new Frequency { Strength = num, Probability = 0 })
                 select freq;
    return result;
}

That leaves us with a dense array of frequency readings. Now we only need to apply the formula:

// Make the arrays dense
recording = recording.FillHoles(1, 100);
reading = reading.FillHoles(1, 100);
// This is the thing we will be summing
IEnumerable<double> series = from rec in recording
                            join read in reading on rec.Strength equals read.Strength
                            select Math.Pow(Math.Sqrt(rec.Probability)-Math.Sqrt(read.Probability), 2);

double result = 1 / Math.Sqrt(2) * Math.Sqrt(series.Sum());
result.Dump();

Not sure if this will be more performant than what you have, though.

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