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This is a homework problem. I'm using C.

I'm inputting a month in the form of a three-letter string (Jul, Jan, Apr...), and I need to convert this input into an integer value.

I am trying to use a switch to set m based on the values of the inputted chars. The following solution is working fine except when the month entered is JUN, which should be converted to 6 but is instead being converted to 2:

char mo[] = {month[0], month[1], month[2]};  //convert the string to a char array

int m;   //declare return value

switch(mo[0]){
case 'j':
    switch(mo[2]){
    case 'n':
        switch(mo[1]){
        case 'a':
            m = 1;
            break;
        case 'u':
            m=6;
            break;
        }
    case 'l':
        m=7;
        break;
    }
case 'f':
    m=2;
    break;

Any idea why this doesn't work for JUN?

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4  
Just use strcmp. –  Pubby May 6 '13 at 22:23
1  
insert break; –  BLUEPIXY May 6 '13 at 22:25
1  
@Pubby OP should really use strncmp, but other than that, yes –  Falmarri May 6 '13 at 22:28
1  
@drewmore: Increase the warning level of your compiler. It can detect the absence of break statements and let you know much sooner than by going to SO :) –  pmg May 6 '13 at 22:29
    
Incidentally, why have you marked this C++ if it's C? –  Component 10 May 6 '13 at 22:37

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

you did not put break; after each nested switch block.

share|improve this answer
1  
That, and 'J' != 'j' –  Ben Voigt May 6 '13 at 22:26
1  
+1 specifically case 'n' and case 'j' do not have break statements. –  pmg May 6 '13 at 22:27

Consider

const char *months = "JAN,FEB,MAR,APR,MAY,JUN,JUL,AUG,SEP,OCT,NOV,DEC,";

const char *find = "MAY";

const char *foundAt = strstr(months, find);
if (foundAt != NULL)
{
    if (foundAt[3] == ',')
    {
        printf("This is month number %d\n", ((foundAt - months) / 4) + 1);
    }
    else
    {
        /* Not a valid month */
    }
}
else
{
    /* Not a valid month */
}

Uppercase your input, and you should be able to find valid months by searching the array. If you found something then look at 3 past that position. If it is a comma, then what you found is valid. Calculate the difference between the point found, and the start of the months. Divide that by 4 to give you a unique number 0 .. N. Add 1, to get a better looking month number (jan = 1 and so on).

This is a bit easier to read and use than the switch approach.

share|improve this answer
    
The code above shows the concept. One would also have to consider the cases where find is not 3 characters long, or has embedded commas, or is an empty string. –  EvilTeach May 7 '13 at 13:32

You are missing a break statement at the end of your case block for 'j' and 'n'.

switch(mo[0]){
case 'j':
    switch(mo[2]){
    case 'n':
        switch(mo[1]){
        case 'a':
            m = 1;
            break;
        case 'u':
            m=6;
            break;
        }
        break;
    case 'l':
        m=7;
        break;
    }
    break;
case 'f':
    m=2;
    break;
share|improve this answer

If you don't need to use a switch statement, a quick and easy solution would be as follows. Let's say you have the month value you want to convert thus:

const char* month = "JUN";

The conversion can be done using:

const char* MONTHS = "JANFEBMARAPRMAYJUNJULAUGSEPOCTNOVDEC";
int monthNo = ( strstr( MONTHS, month ) - MONTHS ) / 3;

After this monthNo would equal 5 (i.e months being numbered 0-11) so just add 1 if you need it to be six.

share|improve this answer
short int mesnum(char *mes){
    if((strcmp(mes,"Jan")==0))
        return 1;
    if((strcmp(mes,"Feb")==0))
        return 2;
    if((strcmp(mes,"Mar")==0))
        return 3;
    if((strcmp(mes,"Apr")==0))
        return 4;
    if((strcmp(mes,"May")==0))
        return 5;
    if((strcmp(mes,"Jun")==0))
        return 6;
    if((strcmp(mes,"Jul")==0))
        return 7;
    if((strcmp(mes,"Aug")==0))
        return 8;
    if((strcmp(mes,"Sep")==0))
        return 9;
    if((strcmp(mes,"Oct")==0))
        return 10;
    if((strcmp(mes,"Nov")==0))
        return 11;
    if((strcmp(mes,"Dec")==0))
        return 12;
    return 99;
}

char* nummes(short int num){
    if(num==1)
        return "Jan";
    if(num==2)
        return "Feb";
    if(num==3)
        return "Mar";
    if(num==4)
        return "Apr";
    if(num==5)
        return "May";
    if(num==6)
        return "Jun";
    if(num==7)
        return "Jul";
    if(num==8)
        return "Aug";
    if(num==9)
        return "Sep";
    if(num==10)
        return "Oct";
    if(num==11)
        return "Nov";
    if(num==12)
        return "Dec";
    return "???";
}
share|improve this answer
1  
A rare use of short int. –  Jack May 6 '13 at 23:10
    
it gets promoted for the equality tests. –  EvilTeach May 7 '13 at 13:34
    
@evilteach what is promoted ? –  mf_ May 7 '13 at 13:45
    
if you compare a float to a double, the float will be 'promoted' to a double for the purposes of the compare. Likewise, a short will be 'promoted' to an int. That rule applies in the case above. The value 12 is an int, therefore the short has to be promoted. –  EvilTeach May 7 '13 at 13:54
    
@evilteach is there a way to circunvent that ? are you saying that i am not saving precious bytes by using a short int ? –  mf_ May 7 '13 at 14:16

@Elazar already have pointed out where's your mistake. It's just Another way to do:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int monthn(const char *);

int main()
{
  printf("JAN:%d,jan:%d\n",monthn("JAN"),monthn("jan"));
  return 0;
}

int monthn(const char *name)
{
  const char *months[] = { "JAN","FEB","MAR","APR","MAY","JUN","JUL","AUG","SEP","OCT","NOV","DEC" };
  int i = 0;
  for(i = 0; i < sizeof(months)/sizeof(months[0]); i++) 
    {
      if(strcmp(months[i], name) == 0) 
      return i;
  }
  return -1;
}

This output:

JAN:0,jan:-1
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