Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I am working on some analysis work and after running softwares between same samples i got output like this

>software1
>id sample1 sample2
 a  0           0
 b  0           0
 c  0           0
 d  0           0
 e  0           0
 f  0           0
 g  0.518775    0.549079
 h  0.0233247   0.101596
 i  15.8679     15.45


>software2
>id sample1 sample2
 a     0    0
 b     0    0
 c     0    0
 d     0    0
 e     0    0
 f     0    0
 g    18.6225669551756  23.7346441585572
 h   199.37101093188    157.926670747323
 i    10.9544511501033  3.65148371670111

now i want to compare or correlate samples between different softwares used...like between sample1 from software1 and sample1 from software2 and sample2 from software1 and sample2 from software2

i am new to R and learning it and any help would be great?

i calculated the correlation between samples now using cor function.can i develop heatmap between them?

share|improve this question
2  
Google "R correlation" google.com.au/… Sorry, mate, but this is really such a basic question... – sashkello May 6 '13 at 22:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted
cor(software1[c("sample1", "sample2")],
    software2[c("sample1", "sample2")])

#             sample1    sample2
# sample1 -0.08296432 -0.1202152
# sample2 -0.07804807 -0.1151872

I will note that the number of zeros in those examples raise the question of whether a different summary method than correlation might be more desirable. Pearson correlation assumes the two vectors would be drawn from a continuous distribution with a low probability of duplicates.

share|improve this answer
    
I calculated the correlation between samples using cor function.can i develop heatmap between the samples? @DWin – abh May 6 '13 at 22:59
1  
No. For a heatmap you need three values: x, y, and a "heat"-matrix. – 42- May 6 '13 at 23:29
1  
@Dwin, see the edit I made to your answer (you missed the fact the OP was asking for a correlation matrix). Now it does provide everything needed for a heat map. – flodel May 6 '13 at 23:42
    
@flodel: I think you deserve the check. – 42- May 8 '13 at 1:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.