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Have some data that looks like this:

widget:
{
    categories: ['hair', 'nails', 'dress']
    colors:     ['red', 'white']
}

The data needs to be queried like this:

SELECT * FROM widget_table WHERE categories == 'hair' AND colors == 'red'

Would like to put this data into a MongoDB sharded cluster. However, it seems like an ideal shard key would not be a list field. In this case, that is not possible because all of the fields are list fields.

  • Is it possible to use a list field, such as the field categories as the shard key in MongoDB?
  • If so, what things should I look out for / be aware of?

Thanks so much!

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1  
shard key cannot be multikey, and I am unsure if this will change anytime soon –  Sammaye May 6 '13 at 23:03
    
Is this data set impossible shard using MongoDB then? –  Chris Dutrow May 6 '13 at 23:21
1  
it's possible to shard it, but not on either of the two fields you list, so either _id or change your schema. This seems like a highly suspect schema to me anyway –  Asya Kamsky May 7 '13 at 7:15
    
@Asya Kamsky - This is possible to shard on one of the list fields. The schema is not ideal for sharding. But the use case requires it. I realize the example object that I provided looks trivial, but it is simplified to remove unnecessary details. The data we are working with is in the tens of millions of objects range and needs to be queried upon using the query that I provided a few thousand times per minute. –  Chris Dutrow May 7 '13 at 17:31
    
That's why I said "OR CHANGE YOUR SCHEMA" - that's what you seem to have done in your answer. Which makes your question "how do I change my schema to shard on categories" and not "how do I shard on an array field". –  Asya Kamsky May 7 '13 at 18:28

2 Answers 2

Based on some of the feed back I am getting that seems to assert that it is not possible to shard using a list field as a shard key, I wanted to illustrate how this use case could be sharded using the limitations of MongoDB:

Original object:

widget:
{
    primary_key: '2389sdjsdafnlfda'

    categories: ['hair', 'nails', 'dress']
    colors:     ['red', 'white']

    #All the other fields in the document that don't need to be queried upon: 
    ...
    ...
}

Data layer splits object into multiple pointer objects based on the number of elements in the field chosen for the shard key:

widget_pointer:
{
    primary_key: '2389sdjsdafnlfda'
    categories: 'hair',
    colors:     ['red', 'white']
}

widget_pointer:
{
    primary_key: '2389sdjsdafnlfda'
    categories: 'nails',
    colors:     ['red', 'white']
}

widget_pointer:
{
    primary_key: '2389sdjsdafnlfda'
    categories: 'dress',
    colors:     ['red', 'white']
}

Explanation:

  • The field categories can now be the shard key in MongoDB.
  • The original object will now be stored in a key-value store. Queries against the data in MongoDB will return a pointer object that will be used to get the object from the key-value store.
  • Queries on the MongoDB data will hit only one shard.
  • Insertions on the MongoDB data will hit as many shards as there are elements in the list, in most cases, only a small subset of the total number of shards will be affected.
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1  
This is pretty irrelevant. What you described is how to change your schema so that you can shard on a simple categories field. It is not possible to use a field which is an array (list) as a shard key. If you change your schema so that it's not an array anymore then you can shard on it. Because it's not a list. –  Asya Kamsky May 7 '13 at 18:27
    
Hi Asya. This example does in fact show how to shard with use case with the limitations of MongoDB. The data layer itself functions as another database layer on top of MongoDB that adds functionality. It uses MongoDB to store an index. The end result would be that the data and indexes are sharded across multiple machines. In other words, reads and writes will only affect a subset of the machines and adding more shards to the cluster would more or less linearly increase the amount of operations that would be done against the data per unit of time. –  Chris Dutrow May 7 '13 at 18:45
    
@ChrisDutrow: I agree with the comment that remodelling your data does not change the underlying constraint of a shard key (it cannot be a list). Sure, you can split your object into a document for each object in the list .. but that has no effect on the actual sharding implementation. The only way you can hit one shard for reading and multiple shards for writing would be duplicating all the data. I would encourage you to read up on MongoDB sharding as your interpretation is misguided. –  Stennie May 7 '13 at 22:26
    
@Stennie - I'm not exactly sure what you mean, the constraint of MongoDB's shard key is still there. However, from the perspective of the application, storage and retrieval of the original data model benefit from the implementation of a sharded cluster in that much higher search and write volumes are possible because both search and write operations are accomplished without affecting all shards in the cluster. –  Chris Dutrow May 7 '13 at 23:11
    
If you are writing your original object into a separate key-value store, I'm really unclear how you benefit from also writing that data into a MongoDB sharded cluster. I suspect you actually want a different product to support your notion of sharding... Redis or Cassandra are probably a much closer fit. Building your own database layer on top of a database does not seem the most efficient approach to scaling (which is the reason you'd be sharding in the first instance). –  Stennie May 8 '13 at 2:43

Sharding in MongoDB (as at 2.4) works by partitioning your documents into ranges of values based on the shard key. A list or array shard key does not make sense as a shard key because it contains multiple values.

It's also worth noting that the shard key is immutable (cannot be changed once set for a document), so you do not want to choose fields that you intend to update.

If you do not have any candidate fields in your documents, you could always add one. A straightforward solution in your case could be to use the new hashed sharding in MongoDB 2.4:

The field you choose as your hashed shard key should have a good cardinality, or large number of different values. Hashed keys work well with fields that increase monotonically like ObjectId values or timestamps.

An obvious question to consider before sharding is "do you need to shard?". Sharding is an approach for scaling out writes with MongoDB, but can be overkill if you aren't yet pushing the limits of your current configuration.

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I may be wrong, but this appears to be misinformation. Use GAE's Big Table, this type of data can be queried on a very large scale. In order to do this, the data must be partitioned across many machines. Off the top of my head, if you wanted to shard using 'categories' as the shard key, the database would have to create one row in the index for each value in the list of 'categories'. If the list had 4 elements, but there were 1000 shards, matches to the search could be narrowed down to 4 out of 1000 shards. –  Chris Dutrow May 7 '13 at 2:03
    
Adding a hashed key would not provide any performance improvements from sharding for the specified query as queries would have to check all shards. –  Chris Dutrow May 7 '13 at 2:06
    
@ChrisDutrow: Your question was specific to MongoDB, not BigTable? Range partitioning is definitely how MongoDB sharding works, and your shard key cannot contain arrays or lists. If your query matches documents on four shards, that is a different question. In terms of hashed shard key: the suggestion there is only because you mention that all of your fields are currently arrays. The _id field in MongoDB cannot be an array, so therefore is still a candidate field. –  Stennie May 7 '13 at 3:05
    
@ChrisDutrow: For an introduction to sharding in MongoDB see: Sharding (Tyler Brock, 10gen). TL;DR: if you skip to the section at slide 32 (Mechanics) you will find an illustration of the approach to partitioning (logical chunks representing a range of document shard keys). –  Stennie May 7 '13 at 3:11
1  
This answer is not "misinformation" - it's rather bizarre to ask whether something can be done (which MongoDB docs clearly say cannot be) and then complain that the answer which explains why it can't be done is "misinformation" because it's not what you wanted to hear. –  Asya Kamsky May 7 '13 at 7:16

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