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I have a list of the diff stats per file for a commit (using diff --numstat in Git) that I need to parse into a tree structure as a hash so I can use it as JSON. The raw data is in a format like this:

1       1       app/assets/javascripts/foo.js.coffee
2       1       app/assets/javascripts/bar.js
16      25      app/assets/javascripts/baz.js.coffee
11      0       app/controllers/foo_controller.rb
3       2       db/schema.rb
41      1       lib/foobar.rb

I need to parse this into a nested hash format something like the following:

{ name: "app", children: [
  { name: "assets", children: [
    { name: "javascripts", children: [
      { name: "foo.js.coffee", add: 1, del: 1 },
      { name: "bar.js", add: 2, del: 1 }
      { name: "baz.js.coffee", add: 16, del: 25 }
    ], add: 19, del: 27 },
    ...
  ] } 
] }

Where every level of the tree is represented by its name, children as a hash and the total number of additions and deletions for that tree.

Is there an efficient way to construct a hash like this in Ruby?

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Where does :add => 18 come from? What determines whether the name is a symbol or a string? Which part is addition and which part is deletion? –  sawa May 6 '13 at 22:59
    
@HunterMcMillen So where does :add => 18 come from (Back to the first question). –  sawa May 6 '13 at 23:04
1  
@sawa, I would presume that 18 should be 19 and should be the sum of all the additions (1st column) for the "javascripts" directory, whereas 27 is the sum of the deletions (2nd column). This piece baffles me: {["foo.js.coffee", 1, 1], ["bar.js", 2, 1], ["baz.js.coffee", 16, 25] }. The curly braces syntax indicates a Hash, which requires key => value notation. If the OP clarifies his question, we would have something better to work with. –  dimitko May 6 '13 at 23:13
    
@dimitko I was thinking exactly as you are. Good points. The question is terribly written. –  sawa May 6 '13 at 23:16
    
Yeah sorry it should be 19 but the point was that it should be an integer representing addition. I've updated the question, hopefully it is more clear. –  jmc May 6 '13 at 23:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Full source here: https://gist.github.com/dimitko/5541709. You can download it and directly run it without any trouble (just make sure to have the awesome_print gem; it shows you the object hierarchy in much more human-readable format).

I enriched your test input a little, to make sure the algorithm doesn't make stupid mistakes.

Given this input:

input = <<TEXT
2       1       app/assets/javascripts/bar.js
16      25      app/assets/javascripts/baz.js.coffee
1       1       app/assets/javascripts/foo.js.coffee
4       9       app/controllers/bar_controller.rb
3       2       app/controllers/baz_controller.rb
11      0       app/controllers/foo_controller.rb
3       2       db/schema.rb
41      1       lib/foobar.rb
12      7       lib/tasks/cache.rake
5       13      lib/tasks/import.rake
TEXT

And this expected result:

[{:name=>"app", :add=>37, :del=>38, :children=>[{:name=>"assets", :add=>19, :del=>27, :children=>[{:name=>"javascripts", :add=>19, :del=>27, :children=>[{:name=>"bar.js", :add=>2, :del=>1}, {:name=>"baz.js.coffee", :add=>16, :del=>25}, {:name=>"foo.js.coffee", :add=>1, :del=>1}]}]}, {:name=>"controllers", :add=>18, :del=>11, :children=>[{:name=>"bar_controller.rb", :add=>4, :del=>9}, {:name=>"baz_controller.rb", :add=>3, :del=>2}, {:name=>"foo_controller.rb", :add=>11, :del=>0}]}]}, {:add=>3, :del=>2, :name=>"db", :children=>[{:name=>"schema.rb", :add=>3, :del=>2}]}, {:add=>58, :del=>21, :name=>"lib", :children=>[{:name=>"foobar.rb", :add=>41, :del=>1}, {:name=>"tasks", :add=>17, :del=>20, :children=>[{:name=>"cache.rake", :add=>12, :del=>7}, {:name=>"import.rake", :add=>5, :del=>13}]}]}]

And this code:

def git_diffnum_parse_paths(list, depth, out)
  to = 1
  base = list.first[:name][depth]
  while list[to] and list[to][:name][depth] == base do
    to += 1
  end

  if list.first[:name][depth+1]
    out << {name: base, add: 0, del: 0, children: []}

    # Common directory found for the first N records; recurse deeper.
    git_diffnum_parse_paths(list[0..to-1], depth + 1, out.last[:children])

    add = del = 0
    out.last[:children].each do |x| add += x[:add].to_i; del += x[:del].to_i; end
    out.last[:add] = add
    out.last[:del] = del
  else
    # It's a file, we can't go any deeper.
    out << {name: list.first[:name].last, add: list.first[:add].to_i, del:     list.first[:del].to_i}
  end

  if list[to]
    # Recurse in to try find common directories for the deeper records.
    git_diffnum_parse_paths(list[to..-1], depth, out)
  end

  nil
end

def to_git_diffnum_tree(txt)
  items = []
  txt.split("\n").each do |line|
    m = line.match(/(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(.+)/).to_a[1..3]
    items << {add: m[0], del: m[1], name: m[2]}
  end

  items.sort! { |a,b|
    a[:name] <=> b[:name]
  }

  items.each do |item|
    item[:name] = item[:name].split("/")
  end

  out = []
  git_diffnum_parse_paths(items, 0, out)
  out
end

And this code, which is using it:

require 'awesome_print'
out = to_git_diffnum_tree(input)
puts; ap out; puts
puts; puts "Expected result:"; puts expected.inspect
puts; puts "Actual result: ";  puts out.inspect
puts; puts "Are expected and actual results identical: #{expected == out}"

It seems to produce what you want.

Notes:

  • I am sorting the array of parsed entries by directory/file names. This is done to avoid walking the entire list to search for a common directory; instead, the algorithm can scan the list up until the first non-match.
  • I am far from thinking that's the most optimal solution, but it's what I have came up with for a free hour.
  • I have left some [un-]commented puts statements in the gist, in case you wanna have a rough glimpse on how does the algorithm work.
  • In case you want to give it a more solid test, try something like this:

git diff --numstat `git rev-list --max-parents=0 HEAD | head -n 1` HEAD

That'd give you number of additions and deletions since the initial commit (provided your Git version is >=1.7.4.2), which is a far bigger input where you can give the algorithm a lot more rigorous testing.

Hope I helped.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a very extensive answer, thank you for that. I will have a look over the algorithm and output and add any comments soon. –  jmc May 9 '13 at 9:50

Define "efficient". If your problem is "performance", your solution isn't ruby.

Unless you're literally running this script on the Linux source code, I wouldn't be worrying about performance, just clarity of intent.

I took inspiration from @dimitko's solution and I minimized the code used.

https://gist.github.com/x1024/3d0f9ad61fcb4b189be3

def git_group lines, root = 'root'
  if lines.count == 1 and lines[0][:name].empty? then
    return {
      name: root,
      add: lines.map { |l| l[:add] }.reduce(0, :+),
      del: lines.map { |l| l[:del] }.reduce(0, :+),
    }
  end

  lines = lines.group_by { |line| line[:name].shift }
               .map { |key, value| git_group(value, key) }

  return {
    name: root,
    add: lines.map { |l| l[:add] }.reduce(0, :+),
    del: lines.map { |l| l[:del] }.reduce(0, :+),
    children: lines
  }
end

def to_git_diffnum_tree(txt)
  data = txt.split("\n")
    .map { |line| line.split() }
    .map { |line| {add: line[0].to_i, del: line[1].to_i, name: line[2].split('/')} }
    .sort_by { |item| item[:name] }

  git_group(data)[:children]
end

And if you are willing to compromise with your data format (i.e. return the same data but in a different structure), you can do this with even less code:

https://gist.github.com/x1024/5ecfdfe886e31f8b5ab9

def git_group lines
  dirs = lines.select { |line| line[:name].count > 1 }
  files = (lines - dirs).map! { |file| [file.delete(:name).shift, file] }
  dirs_processed = dirs.group_by { |dir| dir[:name].shift }
                    .map { |key, value| [key, git_group(value)] }
  data = dirs_processed.concat(files)

  return {
    add: data.map { |k,l| l[:add] }.reduce(0, :+),
    del: data.map { |k,l| l[:del] }.reduce(0, :+),
    children: Hash[data]
  }
end

def to_git_diffnum_tree(txt)
  data = txt.split("\n")
    .map { |line| line.split() }
    .map { |line| {add: line[0].to_i, del: line[1].to_i, name: line[2].split('/')} }
    .sort_by { |item| item[:name] }

  git_group(data)[:children]
end

Remember kids, writing C++ in Ruby is bad.

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