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My game, made in MonoGame (Xna clone to Mac), needs to use the Bloom effect. I followed the code in the sample over at MSDN (http://xbox.create.msdn.com/en-US/education/catalog/sample/bloom). When I put this effect into my 2D game, it made the background a bluish indigo purple thing. I looked around on Google of why this is, I'm not sure why. I couldn't find an answer. I found this StackOverflow question, they said something about Pre-Bloom, which I'm guessing this is what this is. I put my draw code in a component. My Draw code is:

    spriteBatch.Begin();
((Pump)Game).bloomComponent.BeginDraw();
grid.DrawPeices(spriteBatch);
    spriteBatch.End();

The DrawPeices method just goes through a list and draws each sprite normally. My BloomComponent class, which I initialized the component in my main Game class, is:

#region File Description
//-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// BloomComponent.cs
//
// Microsoft XNA Community Game Platform
// Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
//-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
#endregion

#region Using Statements
using System;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Content;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Graphics;
using System.IO;
using System.Reflection;
#endregion

namespace Pump.Libraries.Bloom
{
public class BloomComponent : DrawableGameComponent
{
    #region Fields

    SpriteBatch spriteBatch;

    Effect bloomExtractEffect;
    Effect bloomCombineEffect;
    Effect gaussianBlurEffect;

    RenderTarget2D sceneRenderTarget;
    RenderTarget2D renderTarget1;
    RenderTarget2D renderTarget2;
    RenderTarget2D finalRenderTarget;
    public RenderTarget2D FinalRenderTarget { get { return finalRenderTarget; } }

    byte[] shaderCode;


    // Choose what display settings the bloom should use.
    public BloomSettings Settings
    {
        get { return settings; }
        set { settings = value; }
    }

    BloomSettings settings = BloomSettings.PresetSettings[0];


    // Optionally displays one of the intermediate buffers used
    // by the bloom postprocess, so you can see exactly what is
    // being drawn into each rendertarget.
    public enum IntermediateBuffer
    {
        PreBloom,
        BlurredHorizontally,
        BlurredBothWays,
        FinalResult,
    }

    public IntermediateBuffer ShowBuffer
    {
        get { return showBuffer; }
        set { showBuffer = value; }
    }

    IntermediateBuffer showBuffer = IntermediateBuffer.FinalResult;


    #endregion

    #region Initialization


    public BloomComponent(Game game)
        : base(game)
    {
        if (game == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("game");
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Load your graphics content.
    /// </summary>
    protected override void LoadContent()
    {
        spriteBatch = new SpriteBatch(GraphicsDevice);
        //LOAD ALL THE SHADERS
        var assembly = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly();

        var stream = assembly.GetManifestResourceStream("Pump.Shaders.BloomExtract.mgfxo");

        using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
        {
            stream.CopyTo(ms);
            shaderCode = ms.ToArray();
        }

        stream.Close();
        bloomExtractEffect = new Effect(GraphicsDevice, shaderCode);
        assembly = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly();

        stream = assembly.GetManifestResourceStream("Pump.Shaders.BloomCombine.mgfxo");

        using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
        {
            stream.CopyTo(ms);
            shaderCode = ms.ToArray();
        }

        stream.Close();
        bloomCombineEffect = new Effect(GraphicsDevice, shaderCode);
        assembly = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly();

        stream = assembly.GetManifestResourceStream("Pump.Shaders.GaussianBlur.mgfxo");

        using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
        {
            stream.CopyTo(ms);
            shaderCode = ms.ToArray();
        }

        stream.Close();
        gaussianBlurEffect = new Effect(GraphicsDevice, shaderCode);

        /*bloomExtractEffect = Game.Content.Load<Effect>("BloomExtract");
        bloomCombineEffect = Game.Content.Load<Effect>("BloomCombine");
        gaussianBlurEffect = Game.Content.Load<Effect>("GaussianBlur");*/

        // Look up the resolution and format of our main backbuffer.
        PresentationParameters pp = GraphicsDevice.PresentationParameters;

        int width = pp.BackBufferWidth;
        int height = pp.BackBufferHeight;

        SurfaceFormat format = pp.BackBufferFormat;

        // Create a texture for rendering the main scene, prior to applying bloom.
        sceneRenderTarget = new RenderTarget2D(GraphicsDevice, width, height, false,
                                               format, pp.DepthStencilFormat, pp.MultiSampleCount,
                                               RenderTargetUsage.DiscardContents);
        finalRenderTarget = new RenderTarget2D(GraphicsDevice, width, height, false,
                                               format, pp.DepthStencilFormat, pp.MultiSampleCount,
                                               RenderTargetUsage.DiscardContents);

        // Create two rendertargets for the bloom processing. These are half the
        // size of the backbuffer, in order to minimize fillrate costs. Reducing
        // the resolution in this way doesn't hurt quality, because we are going
        // to be blurring the bloom images in any case.
        width /= 2;
        height /= 2;

        renderTarget1 = new RenderTarget2D(GraphicsDevice, width, height, false, format, DepthFormat.None);
        renderTarget2 = new RenderTarget2D(GraphicsDevice, width, height, false, format, DepthFormat.None);
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Unload your graphics content.
    /// </summary>
    protected override void UnloadContent()
    {
        sceneRenderTarget.Dispose();
        renderTarget1.Dispose();
        renderTarget2.Dispose();
    }


    #endregion

    #region Draw


    /// <summary>
    /// This should be called at the very start of the scene rendering. The bloom
    /// component uses it to redirect drawing into its custom rendertarget, so it
    /// can capture the scene image in preparation for applying the bloom filter.
    /// </summary>
    public void BeginDraw()
    {
        if (Visible)
        {
            GraphicsDevice.SetRenderTarget(sceneRenderTarget);
        }
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// This is where it all happens. Grabs a scene that has already been rendered,
    /// and uses postprocess magic to add a glowing bloom effect over the top of it.
    /// </summary>
    public override void Draw(GameTime gameTime)
    {
        GraphicsDevice.SamplerStates[1] = SamplerState.LinearClamp;

        // Pass 1: draw the scene into rendertarget 1, using a
        // shader that extracts only the brightest parts of the image.
        bloomExtractEffect.Parameters["BloomThreshold"].SetValue(
            Settings.BloomThreshold);

        DrawFullscreenQuad(sceneRenderTarget, renderTarget1,
                           bloomExtractEffect,
                           IntermediateBuffer.PreBloom);

        // Pass 2: draw from rendertarget 1 into rendertarget 2,
        // using a shader to apply a horizontal gaussian blur filter.
        SetBlurEffectParameters(1.0f / (float)renderTarget1.Width, 0);

        DrawFullscreenQuad(renderTarget1, renderTarget2,
                           gaussianBlurEffect,
                           IntermediateBuffer.BlurredHorizontally);

        // Pass 3: draw from rendertarget 2 back into rendertarget 1,
        // using a shader to apply a vertical gaussian blur filter.
        SetBlurEffectParameters(0, 1.0f / (float)renderTarget1.Height);

        DrawFullscreenQuad(renderTarget2, renderTarget1,
                           gaussianBlurEffect,
                           IntermediateBuffer.BlurredBothWays);

        // Pass 4: draw both rendertarget 1 and the original scene
        // image back into the main backbuffer, using a shader that
        // combines them to produce the final bloomed result.
        GraphicsDevice.SetRenderTarget(null);

        EffectParameterCollection parameters = bloomCombineEffect.Parameters;

        parameters["BloomIntensity"].SetValue(Settings.BloomIntensity);
        parameters["BaseIntensity"].SetValue(Settings.BaseIntensity);
        parameters["BloomSaturation"].SetValue(Settings.BloomSaturation);
        parameters["BaseSaturation"].SetValue(Settings.BaseSaturation);

        GraphicsDevice.Textures[1] = sceneRenderTarget;

        Viewport viewport = GraphicsDevice.Viewport;

        DrawFullscreenQuad(renderTarget1,
                           viewport.Width, viewport.Height,
                           bloomCombineEffect,
                           IntermediateBuffer.FinalResult);
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Helper for drawing a texture into a rendertarget, using
    /// a custom shader to apply postprocessing effects.
    /// </summary>
    void DrawFullscreenQuad(Texture2D texture, RenderTarget2D renderTarget,
                            Effect effect, IntermediateBuffer currentBuffer)
    {
        GraphicsDevice.SetRenderTarget(renderTarget);

        DrawFullscreenQuad(texture,
                           renderTarget.Width, renderTarget.Height,
                           effect, currentBuffer);
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Helper for drawing a texture into the current rendertarget,
    /// using a custom shader to apply postprocessing effects.
    /// </summary>
    void DrawFullscreenQuad(Texture2D texture, int width, int height,
                            Effect effect, IntermediateBuffer currentBuffer)
    {
        // If the user has selected one of the show intermediate buffer options,
        // we still draw the quad to make sure the image will end up on the screen,
        // but might need to skip applying the custom pixel shader.
        if (showBuffer < currentBuffer)
        {
            effect = null;
        }

        spriteBatch.Begin(0, BlendState.Opaque, null, null, null, effect);
        spriteBatch.Draw(texture, new Rectangle(0, 0, width, height), Color.White);
        spriteBatch.End();
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Computes sample weightings and texture coordinate offsets
    /// for one pass of a separable gaussian blur filter.
    /// </summary>
    void SetBlurEffectParameters(float dx, float dy)
    {
        // Look up the sample weight and offset effect parameters.
        EffectParameter weightsParameter, offsetsParameter;

        weightsParameter = gaussianBlurEffect.Parameters["SampleWeights"];
        offsetsParameter = gaussianBlurEffect.Parameters["SampleOffsets"];

        // Look up how many samples our gaussian blur effect supports.
        int sampleCount = weightsParameter.Elements.Count;

        // Create temporary arrays for computing our filter settings.
        float[] sampleWeights = new float[sampleCount];
        Vector2[] sampleOffsets = new Vector2[sampleCount];

        // The first sample always has a zero offset.
        sampleWeights[0] = ComputeGaussian(0);
        sampleOffsets[0] = new Vector2(0);

        // Maintain a sum of all the weighting values.
        float totalWeights = sampleWeights[0];

        // Add pairs of additional sample taps, positioned
        // along a line in both directions from the center.
        for (int i = 0; i < sampleCount / 2; i++)
        {
            // Store weights for the positive and negative taps.
            float weight = ComputeGaussian(i + 1);

            sampleWeights[i * 2 + 1] = weight;
            sampleWeights[i * 2 + 2] = weight;

            totalWeights += weight * 2;

            // To get the maximum amount of blurring from a limited number of
            // pixel shader samples, we take advantage of the bilinear filtering
            // hardware inside the texture fetch unit. If we position our texture
            // coordinates exactly halfway between two texels, the filtering unit
            // will average them for us, giving two samples for the price of one.
            // This allows us to step in units of two texels per sample, rather
            // than just one at a time. The 1.5 offset kicks things off by
            // positioning us nicely in between two texels.
            float sampleOffset = i * 2 + 1.5f;

            Vector2 delta = new Vector2(dx, dy) * sampleOffset;

            // Store texture coordinate offsets for the positive and negative taps.
            sampleOffsets[i * 2 + 1] = delta;
            sampleOffsets[i * 2 + 2] = -delta;
        }

        // Normalize the list of sample weightings, so they will always sum to one.
        for (int i = 0; i < sampleWeights.Length; i++)
        {
            sampleWeights[i] /= totalWeights;
        }

        // Tell the effect about our new filter settings.
        weightsParameter.SetValue(sampleWeights);
        offsetsParameter.SetValue(sampleOffsets);
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Evaluates a single point on the gaussian falloff curve.
    /// Used for setting up the blur filter weightings.
    /// </summary>
    float ComputeGaussian(float n)
    {
        float theta = Settings.BlurAmount;

        return (float)((1.0 / Math.Sqrt(2 * Math.PI * theta)) *
                       Math.Exp(-(n * n) / (2 * theta * theta)));
    }


    #endregion
}
}

And finally, BloomSettings.cs:

#region File Description
//-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// BloomSettings.cs
//
// Microsoft XNA Community Game Platform
// Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
//-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
#endregion

namespace Pump.Libraries.Bloom
{
/// <summary>
/// Class holds all the settings used to tweak the bloom effect.
/// </summary>
public class BloomSettings
{
    #region Fields


    // Name of a preset bloom setting, for display to the user.
    public readonly string Name;


    // Controls how bright a pixel needs to be before it will bloom.
    // Zero makes everything bloom equally, while higher values select
    // only brighter colors. Somewhere between 0.25 and 0.5 is good.
    public readonly float BloomThreshold;


    // Controls how much blurring is applied to the bloom image.
    // The typical range is from 1 up to 10 or so.
    public readonly float BlurAmount;


    // Controls the amount of the bloom and base images that
    // will be mixed into the final scene. Range 0 to 1.
    public readonly float BloomIntensity;
    public readonly float BaseIntensity;


    // Independently control the color saturation of the bloom and
    // base images. Zero is totally desaturated, 1.0 leaves saturation
    // unchanged, while higher values increase the saturation level.
    public readonly float BloomSaturation;
    public readonly float BaseSaturation;


    #endregion


    /// <summary>
    /// Constructs a new bloom settings descriptor.
    /// </summary>
    public BloomSettings(string name, float bloomThreshold, float blurAmount,
                         float bloomIntensity, float baseIntensity,
                         float bloomSaturation, float baseSaturation)
    {
        Name = name;
        BloomThreshold = bloomThreshold;
        BlurAmount = blurAmount;
        BloomIntensity = bloomIntensity;
        BaseIntensity = baseIntensity;
        BloomSaturation = bloomSaturation;
        BaseSaturation = baseSaturation;
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Table of preset bloom settings, used by the sample program.
    /// </summary>
    public static BloomSettings[] PresetSettings =
    {
        //                Name           Thresh  Blur Bloom  Base  BloomSat BaseSat
        new BloomSettings("Default",     0.25f,  4,   1.25f, 1,    1,       1),
        new BloomSettings("Soft",        0,      3,   1,     1,    1,       1),
        new BloomSettings("Desaturated", 0.5f,   8,   2,     1,    0,       1),
        new BloomSettings("Saturated",   0.25f,  4,   2,     1,    2,       0),
        new BloomSettings("Blurry",      0,      2,   1,     0.1f, 1,       1),
        new BloomSettings("Subtle",      0.5f,   2,   1,     1,    1,       1),
    };
}
}

Can somebody explain why the screen is blue/indigo, and how I can fix it? My original background was black, if you should need to know. Oh, and I have a screenshot:Bloom Purple Screen

share|improve this question
    
That's render-target purple. My guess is you're drawing to a RenderTarget that you're not blacking out first. –  anaximander May 9 '13 at 12:25

1 Answer 1

In looking at your screenshot and code it does appear that you are not clearing your rendertagets, I would modify your BeginDraw code to call Clear so that your targets are initialized to a known value before you draw to them.

/// <summary>
/// This should be called at the very start of the scene rendering. The bloom
/// component uses it to redirect drawing into its custom rendertarget, so it
/// can capture the scene image in preparation for applying the bloom filter.
/// </summary>
public void BeginDraw()
{
    if (Visible)
    {
        GraphicsDevice.SetRenderTarget(renderTarget1);
        GraphicsDevice.Clear(Color.Black);
        GraphicsDevice.SetRenderTarget(renderTarget2);
        GraphicsDevice.Clear(Color.Black);
        GraphicsDevice.SetRenderTarget(FinalRenderTarget);
        GraphicsDevice.Clear(Color.Black);
        GraphicsDevice.SetRenderTarget(sceneRenderTarget);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This code is exactly what I had before (more or less). I have my bloomComponent class as a DrawableGameComponent, which will call Draw() automaticly once mainGameComponent is done drawing. I did try this code, but it made no difference. –  cakeisajoke May 7 '13 at 22:08
    
This actually helped a lot for me in porting XNA 3.1 code over to 4.0. For some reason, a bloom shader was going absolutely crazy. Clearing the graphics device directly after a call to SetRenderTarget() did most of the trick. I cannot imagine why clearing the graphics device in the middle of a render method fixes this, though. –  TGP1994 Jun 24 '13 at 2:07

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