Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can't seem to wrap my head around this. I have the same setup for the other program which is a stack,push/pop and it's working perfectly. I'm receiving undeclared values first time used in function errors. Any help would be appreciated.

header file

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int money();
void amortization();

typedef struct{
int principle;
int rate;
int payments;
} loan_t;

function code

int money(loan_t)
{
 printf("Please input the amount borrowed:");
 scanf("%d", &principle);
 printf("\nPlease input the Annual Interest Rate:");
 scanf("%d", &rate);
 printf("\nPlease input the number of monthly payments:\n");
 scanf("%d", &payments);
 return (principle,rate,payments);
 }

thank you!

share|improve this question
    
Your return compiles because you're using the comma operator; your compiler might be warning you about 'left-hand operand of comma expression has no effect' or something similar. If you declare local variables principle, rate, and payments (all of type int), and you define the return type as loan_t, you could use a compound literal in the return (using C99): return (loan_t){ principle, rate, payments };. Note that "%lf" reads a double value but the elements of the loan_t structure are all int; there's a problem there. –  Jonathan Leffler May 7 '13 at 0:26
    
I didn't clarify what I'm trying to do, sorry. What my program is to do is take those values entered then use those in a different function to return an amortization table, which uses those values and calculates multiple formulas. –  Hamas4 May 7 '13 at 0:32
    
Note that you must specify a name for the parameter to money() (perhaps, but not sensibly, int money(loan_t loan);). Also note that your declaration in the header is not a prototype; it says nothing about the number or types of the arguments to the function. You probably need either loan_t money(void); or int money(loan_t *ploan); as the function declaration, depending on how you want to fix your code. –  Jonathan Leffler May 7 '13 at 0:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

try:

 int money(LOAN *var){
     printf("Please input the amount borrowed:");
     scanf("%lf", var->principle);
     printf("\nPlease input the Annual Interest Rate:");
     scanf("%lf", var->rate);
     printf("\nPlease input the number of monthly payments:\n");
     scanf("%lf", var->payments);
     return 0;
 }

change header to:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef struct loan{
    double principle;
    double rate;
    double payments;
}LOAN;

int money(LOAN *var);
void amortization();

this means you will return a loan_t with the desirable values inside

edit: edited to suit you the best, not to the best practice as Jonathan Leffler recommended

declare a LOAN variable; inside main() and then call money(&variable);

share|improve this answer
    
I prefer the question's loan_t to your LOAN_t. Both are dodgy in a POSIX environment where _t is reserved for the implementation to use. If you pass var into money(), there's no need to return it; you could save the return value to indicate whether the reads were all successful (well, you could if you paid any attention to the return values from scanf(), which you should, of course. Since the structure elements are all int, using %lf in the format is going to lead to problems. –  Jonathan Leffler May 7 '13 at 0:20
    
I was testing the return that's why it's weird. Also, now I'm getting scode.c:15: error: parse error before '*' token scode.c:15: error: conflicting types for 'money' loan.h:4: error: previous declaration of 'money' was here –  Hamas4 May 7 '13 at 0:22
    
@Hamas4 answer edited –  mf_ May 7 '13 at 0:32
    
In scanf(), "%f" is for float, "%lf" is for double, and "%Lf" is for long double. –  Jonathan Leffler May 7 '13 at 0:39
    
@jonathan-leffler regarding that i just have to say i have a bad C book, it says there float - %f,%e,%E and double - %f,%e,%E –  mf_ May 7 '13 at 0:42

Based on what you have provided, it looks like principle, rate, and payments are all undeclared in money. You also provide a type as a parameter without a parameter name in money.

edit: as noted by the other answerer, return is fishy as well.

I am not able to test this myself right now, but try:

loan_t money(loan_t loan)
{
 printf("Please input the amount borrowed:");
 scanf("%lf", &(loan.principle));
 printf("\nPlease input the Annual Interest Rate:");
 scanf("%lf", &(loan.rate));
 printf("\nPlease input the number of monthly payments:\n");
 scanf("%lf", &(loan.payments));
 return loan;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
The is no point in passing in the loan_t loan by value since you'll have to return the new value. You should just take no arguments, make loan_t loan; into a local variable, check that the scanf() calls work, and return loan at the end (as you do). –  Jonathan Leffler May 7 '13 at 0:21
    
Still giving errors, I'm probably implementing the header wrong for this fix. –  Hamas4 May 7 '13 at 0:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.