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So I'm working on a deal or no deal java game essentially, and right now I'm trying to have the image icon disappear where the user clicked. So I have an 6 by 6 array of 'metal briefcase' (casesArray) image icons, but regardless of where the user clicks, only the image icon in the top left disappears. I'm guessing this is just a logic mistake on my part, but I can't seem to figure out what I'm doing wrong...

class MouseClickListener implements MouseListener
    {
        public void mouseClicked (MouseEvent event)
        {
            if (event.getX() <= 133)row=0;
            else if (event.getX() <= 267 && event.getX()>133)row=1;
            else if (event.getX() <= 400 && event.getX()>267)row=2;
            else if (event.getX() <= 533 && event.getX()>400)row=3;
            else if (event.getX() <= 667 && event.getX()>533)row=4;
            else if (event.getX() <= 800 && event.getX()>667)row=5;
             if (event.getY() <= 100)column=0;
            else if (event.getY() <= 200 && event.getY() > 100)column=1;
            else if (event.getY() <= 300 && event.getY() > 200)column=2;
            else if (event.getY() <= 400 && event.getY() > 300)column=3;
            else if (event.getY() <= 500 && event.getY() > 400)column=4;
            else if (event.getY() <= 600 && event.getY() > 500)column=5;

            casesArray[row][column].setIcon(null);
            repaint();
        }
    .
    .
    .
    .
for(int i=0; i<6; i++)
    {
        for(int j=0; j<6; j++)
        {
            casesArray[i][j].addMouseListener(new MouseClickListener());
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Your getX()/ getY() return coordinates relative to each component. –  PM 77-1 May 7 '13 at 1:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

MouseEvents are contextual to the component that raised them. That is, the x/y point of the event is automatically converted to the coordinate space of the component that the event occurred on.

So, if a component exists at 100x100 within it's parent, when you click on it, the mouse event will be converted so coordinates are 0x0, representing the top level corner of the component that was clicked.

Instead of using a series of if statements, try actually referencing the component directly...

class MouseClickListener implements MouseListener
{
    public void mouseClicked (MouseEvent event)
    {
        Component comp = event.getComponent();
        if (comp instanceof JLabel) {
            ((JLabel)comp).setIcon(null);
        }
    }
}

Updated with additional example

MouseEvent#getSource returns a reference to the object that created the event...

class MouseClickListener implements MouseListener
{
    public void mouseClicked (MouseEvent event)
    {
        Object source = event.getSource();
        for (int x = 0; x < casesArray.length; x++) {
            for (int y = 0; y < casesArray[x].length; y++) {
                if (casesArray[x][y] == source) {
                    casesArray[x][y].setIcon(null);
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

A safer solution would be to continue using getComponent as the source of the event could potentially be different to the component that the event occurred on...

class MouseClickListener implements MouseListener
{
    public void mouseClicked (MouseEvent event)
    {
        Component source = event.getComponent();
        for (int x = 0; x < casesArray.length; x++) {
            for (int y = 0; y < casesArray[x].length; y++) {
                if (casesArray[x][y] == source) {
                    casesArray[x][y].setIcon(null);
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Working example

enter image description here

This basically loads a bunch of images from a folder and displays them in a 6x6 grid. Click on any image will set it's corresponding label's icon to null

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.GridLayout;
import java.awt.event.MouseAdapter;
import java.awt.event.MouseEvent;
import java.awt.event.MouseListener;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import javax.imageio.ImageIO;
import javax.swing.ImageIcon;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;

public class ClickTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new ClickTest();
    }

    public ClickTest() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException | InstantiationException | IllegalAccessException | UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                }

                JFrame frame = new JFrame("Testing");
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
                frame.add(new TestPane());
                frame.pack();
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }

    public class TestPane extends JPanel {

        private JLabel[][] casesArray;

        public TestPane() {

            setLayout(new GridLayout(0, 6));

            File[] files = new File("/path/to/lots/of/images").listFiles();

            MouseListener listener = new MouseAdapter() {
                @Override
                public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent event) {
                    Object source = event.getSource();
                    for (int x = 0; x < casesArray.length; x++) {
                        for (int y = 0; y < casesArray[x].length; y++) {
                            if (casesArray[x][y] == source) {
                                casesArray[x][y].setIcon(null);
                                break;
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            };

            casesArray = new JLabel[6][6];
            int index = 0;
            for (int x = 0; x < 6; x++) {
                for (int y = 0; y < 6; y++) {
                    JLabel label = new JLabel();
                    try {
                        label.setIcon(new ImageIcon(ImageIO.read(files[index++])));
                    } catch (IOException ex) {
                        ex.printStackTrace();
                    }
                    label.addMouseListener(listener);
                    casesArray[x][y] = label;
                    add(casesArray[x][y]);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
unfortunately my teacher has not taught us any of that and I need to stay within the bounds of his lesson so that's why I was trying to use the if statements with the source of the click –  user2228503 May 7 '13 at 1:14
    
+1, @user2228503 use a single MouseListener. You don't need to create 36 MouseListeners. –  camickr May 7 '13 at 1:16
    
@user2228503 Then you are going to lose. The only thing you can do is either check the event.getSource() against the list of casesArray directly (ie caseArray[x][y] == event.getSource() within a compound loop OR you can take the easy way and use what the API is providing you... –  MadProgrammer May 7 '13 at 1:18
    
doesn't the case array contain index values inside the []'s whereas the getSource returns x and y coordinates. I'm not questioning your answer, I just don't understand how it would work exactly... –  user2228503 May 7 '13 at 1:37
    
MouseEvent#getSource returns a reference to the object that created the event. Check update –  MadProgrammer May 7 '13 at 1:45

but regardless of where the user clicks, only the image icon in the top left disappears

Well you are adding a MouseListener to each of the components. Therefore the mouse point will be relative to each JLabel. So therefore only the first label has accurate mouse points.

If you want to use if/else logic then you should only add a single MouseListener to the parent JPanel that contains the 36 labels. Then the mouse point is relative to the panel and you can use math to determine which label is at a specific location on the panel assuming you know the size of each label.

The better solution is to create a single listener, but add the listener to each of the labels. Then you just use the getSource() method as has been mentioned by MadProgrammer. You teacher should be teaching you how to use write generic listeners that can be used by multiple components. Any time you see if/else logic you know you have a bad design.

share|improve this answer
    
doesn't the getSource method return an x,y location? I don't understand how that would work in the array to choose the right 'case' –  user2228503 May 7 '13 at 1:29
    
I though you were usig getX() and getY() to get the location. Why would you think the getSource() method also does that? What does the API say for the getSource() method? What does the array have to do with anything? MadProgrammer gave you working code. His suggestion to use the getComponent() method is better since you don't have to cast the "source" object to a "component". There is no need to reference the array with his suggestion. –  camickr May 7 '13 at 1:45

You can use Netbeans Ide Design mode to gen code Events and copy code that way

Ex: Jlabel Event Mouse Click:

  1. Add Mouse Listener lboKH.addMouseListener(lb_Mouse_Click_Event);

  2. Declare event

private MouseListener lb_Mouse_Click_Event = new java.awt.event.MouseAdapter() {

    @Override
    public void mouseClicked(java.awt.event.MouseEvent evt) {
        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(getRootPane(), "a");
    }
}; 

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