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I'm currently trying to create a compiler using flex, bison and llvm (3.2) for a programming language I created and I would like to allow programmers to insert C++ code.

Example :

//some code using my own language
extern
{
    int i = 42;
    // Other code..
    std::cout << "I'm here !" << std::endl;
}
//some other code using my own language

After the syntaxic analysis, I have an object containing the C++ code in my AST. How do I insert it in the IR code ?

BONUS :

I also want to do something like :

myInt i = 42; // myInt : 64bits
extern
{
    std::cout << i << std::endl;
}

Is this possible ?

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Using the clang library as well? –  Joachim Pileborg May 7 '13 at 0:58
    
@Joachim Pileborg Is it possible to mix two different languages? One custom and other popularly known. The syntax may play a big role. Just asking for GK. I've never designed/worked a compiler etc. –  bikram990 May 7 '13 at 10:01
1  
@bikram990 It might not be a good idea to mix two (or more) languages in a single source file, but with the right frameworks it certainly possible to handle. It's just important that the first language recognizes that "this block is part of another language that I can't parse" and then send it to the other parser. –  Joachim Pileborg May 7 '13 at 10:06
    
@Joachim Pileborg In this specific case which could be used as first language the custom/well known 3rd party language? –  bikram990 May 7 '13 at 10:15
    
@Joachim Pileborg I think it would be more like adding inline Assembly to c/c++ code. Is my understanding correct? –  bikram990 May 7 '13 at 10:18

2 Answers 2

What you're trying to do is likely very complex, and you should consider the proposed semantics carefully. Chunks of C++ code need to be compiled as well, unless you're generating C++ code. The easiest way to compile chunks of C++ is by using clang as a library. It can generate LLVM IR for you from C++ code. But to do anything remotely useful with that IR, it has to be tied to the actual IR your compiler generates, and this is where things can be arbitrarily complex - it all depends on more rigidly defined semantics.

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Ok, thanks. I guess I'll just give up this idea then.Is there a way to implement a function that print something on the standard output to provide a printf-like function in my language ? I searched but found nothing useful about that... –  user2356495 May 7 '13 at 20:52
    
@user2356495: i don't understand what you're asking sorry. If this is unrelated, please open a new question and describe your request in detail –  Eli Bendersky May 7 '13 at 22:08

I see two relatively "doable" ways to achive this:

  1. Preparse your translation unit to emit C/C++ source and your compilable code. E.g. transform this:

    myInt i = 42; // myInt : 64bits
    extern
    {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }
    

    into 2 files:

    1. A cppsource that will have a function:

      void ____genfunc1 (int i) {
          std::cout << i << std::endl;
      }
      
    2. "clean" source file in your language (though I guess you may as well emit LLVM IR directly) that is phrased like:

      myInt i = 42; // myInt : 64bits
      ___native_call (____genfunc1, i);
      

    Your "___native_call" function will have to marshal objects to/from C/C++ (and, possibly, do other runtime mumbo-jumbo - acquire/release monitors, increment/decrement reference counters/copy values between different memory spaces) and call the function itself.

    This way you get 2 objects that you pass to linker to make an executable. Note that there are countless pitfalls trying to mix different languages, especially if they represent substantially different abstraction levels.

  2. Turn your compiler into preprocessor that will emit C++ source file - e.g. translate your language into C++. Debug information management will likely become hell, for once :)

Either way, this will be clunky and likely confusing to the end-user. Why not simply support proper ABIs and have users keep C++ code in C++ files?

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