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I'd like to create a module called StatusesExtension that defines a has_statuses method. When a class extends StatusesExtension, it will have validations, scopes, and accessors for on those statuses. Here's the module:

module StatusesExtension
  def has_statuses(*status_names)
    validates :status, presence: true, inclusion: { in: status_names }

    # Scopes
    status_names.each do |status_name|
      scope "#{status_name}", where(status: status_name)
    end

    # Accessors
    status_names.each do |status_name|
      define_method "#{status_name}?" do
        status == status_name
      end
    end
  end
end

Here's an example of a class that extends this module:

def Question < ActiveRecord::Base
  extend StatusesExtension
  has_statuses :unanswered, :answered, :ignored
end

The problem I'm encountering is that while scopes are being defined, the instance methods (answered?, unanswered?, and ignored?) are not. For example:

> Question.answered
=> [#<Question id: 1, ...>]
> Question.answered.first.answered?
=> false # Should be true

How can I use modules to define both class methods (scopes, validations) and instance methods (accessors) within the context of a single class method (has_statuses) of a module?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
They are being defined, just not right. If you get a result other than NoMethodError, the method has been defined. –  Linuxios May 7 '13 at 2:03
1  
Works for me: gist.github.com/jimmycuadra/5529912 –  Jimmy Cuadra May 7 '13 at 2:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As the comments have said, the method is being defined, just not working as expected. I suspect this is because you are comparing a string with a symbol within the method (status_names is an array of symbols, and status will be a string). Try the following:

status_names.each do |status_name|
  define_method "#{status_name}?" do
    status == status_name.to_s
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
This works, thanks a lot! I noticed that my attempt to set the STATUS default value to a symbol in my POSTGRES migration actually made it a string. ("unanswered" instead of :unanswered)... Do you know of a way to set symbols as defaults in migrations? My attempt: "add_column :questions, :status, :string, default: :unanswered" –  oregontrail256 May 7 '13 at 15:51
    
Symbols are a Ruby thing, and therefore don't relaly make sense oustide a ruby context, like in a database. Your database will always hold string values. –  AlexT May 9 '13 at 14:31

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