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template <class T>
T Read () {
  T t;
  cin >> t;
  if (cin.fail()) {
    // ...
  }
  return t;
}

This generic code read value of type T with some additional error handling. It relies on having operator>> that can parse T, and in this way it is extensible to new types.

What I didn't realize is that it relies on T having a default constructor. Now I've hit into this problem.

What are my options?

What is the right way to do it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Streaming from an input stream always assumes a fully constructed object to write into. You can't get around having to construct an object, all you can do is allow for different ways to do so.

One way to do this could be traits. The standard traits would do what you're doing:

template< typename T >
struct istream_traits
{
  inline static T read(std::istream& is)
  {
    T obj;
    is >> obj;
  }
}

template< typename T >
inline T read(std::istream& is)
{
  is >> std::ws;
  T obj = istream_traits<T>::read(is);
  is >> std::ws;
  if(!is.eof()) throw "dammit!";
  return obj; 
}

If you have a type X that cannot be default-constructed, but can be constructed from an istream, the following specialization would do:

template<>
struct istream_traits<X>
{
  inline static X read(std::istream& is)
  {
    return X(is);
  }
}
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"is >> obj;" is done twice in read and after read. –  Łukasz Lew Oct 29 '09 at 1:45
    
I guess "istream_traits<T>::read(is);" shoud be "istream_policy<T>::read(is);" –  Łukasz Lew Oct 29 '09 at 1:45
    
Can I do a massive specialization, ie not for every type separately, but something like "if there is no default constructor try X(istream&) and if this fails too try named constructor: X X::OfStream(istream&); ? –  Łukasz Lew Oct 29 '09 at 2:09
    
Using Concept Checking + SFINAE, I suppose it would be possible. –  Matthieu M. Oct 29 '09 at 7:55
    
@Łukasz: I apologize for the silly errors. (It was past 2am, in case this counts as an excuse.) As Matthieu already pointed out, there are template techniques to do such things. As another idea, boost (boost.org) has a comprehensive type traits library which might have something like is_default_constructible. (I haven't used it, so I don't know.) Regarding specializing for "everything else": you do it the other way around and specialize for everything except the "everything else". Read this classic article by Andrei Alexandrescu: erdani.com/publications/traits.html. –  sbi Oct 29 '09 at 8:57

Why construct a temporary T and then return a copy of it?

template <class T>
T& Read(T &t) {
    cin >> t;
    if (cin.fail()) {
        // ...
    }
    return t;
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is a void missing... –  Georg Fritzsche Oct 29 '09 at 2:04
    
Thanks for noticing that, gf. Updated to return the T reference instead, as that's likely more useful. –  jamessan Oct 29 '09 at 2:09
    
How does that help in solving the 'no default constructor' problem ? –  Matthieu M. Oct 29 '09 at 7:55

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