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How do I catch a ctrl-c event in C++?

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Console application, windows application, or what? – GManNickG Oct 29 '09 at 1:40
5  
Which OS Windows, Linux, etc.. – shf301 Oct 29 '09 at 1:41
1  
Well, it's a Qt app, but I'm running it from the console during development. (This is Linux) – Scott Oct 29 '09 at 1:41
up vote 102 down vote accepted

signal isn't the most reliable way as it differs in implementations. I would recommend using sigaction. Tom's code would now look like this :

#include <signal.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

void my_handler(int s){
           printf("Caught signal %d\n",s);
           exit(1); 

}

int main(int argc,char** argv)
{

   struct sigaction sigIntHandler;

   sigIntHandler.sa_handler = my_handler;
   sigemptyset(&sigIntHandler.sa_mask);
   sigIntHandler.sa_flags = 0;

   sigaction(SIGINT, &sigIntHandler, NULL);

   pause();

   return 0;    
}
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1  
I think my_handler should take int s as it's argument. sig_t is itself a function pointer type. – Matthew Marshall Mar 10 '10 at 16:34
16  
<stdlib.h>, etc - it's C, not C++. In C++ you should use <cstdlib> – Abyx Sep 19 '10 at 11:59
    
Works on OSX. In my main.mm file, I didn't even need to include signal.h, stdlib.h, or unistd.h. I just included stdio.h and Foundation/Foundation.h, and then if I needed to do std::cout stuff for outputting a shutdown message, I included iostream. – Volomike Mar 31 at 18:03

For a Windows console app, you want to use SetConsoleCtrlHandler to handle CTRL+C and CTRL+BREAK.

See here for an example.

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You have to catch the SIGINT signal (we are talking POSIX right?)

See @Gab Royer´s answer for sigaction.

Example:

#include <signal.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void my_handler(sig_t s){
           printf("Caught signal %d\n",s);
           exit(1); 

}

int main(int argc,char** argv)
{
   signal (SIGINT,my_handler);

   while(1);
   return 0;

}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it's POSIX. I forgot to add Linux to the question. – Scott Oct 29 '09 at 1:42
2  
signal() behaves differently, depending if it follows BSD or SysV style. sigaction() is preferable. – asveikau Oct 29 '09 at 1:49
    
Yes that code didn't work for me. sigaction did. – Matt Jan 17 '11 at 10:49

Yeah, this is a platform dependent question.

If you are writing a console program on POSIX, use the signal API (#include <signal.h>).

In a WIN32 GUI application you should handle the WM_KEYDOWN message.

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