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Is this allowed?

input w;
     input [8:0]y;
     output reg [8:0]x;
     always@(w)
     begin


     //x[0] or A is never on in any next state
     assign x[0] = 0;
     assign x[1]= (y[0]&~w) | (y[5]&~w) | (y[6]&~w) | (y[7]&~w) | (y[8]&~w); //B
     assign x[2]= (y[1]&~w); //C
     assign x[3]= (y[2]&~w); //D
     assign x[4]= (y[3]&~w) | (y[4]&~w); //E
     assign x[5]= (y[0]&w) | (y[1]&w) | (y[2]&w) | (y[3]&w) | (y[4]&w); //F
     assign x[6]= (y[5]&w);
     assign x[7]= (y[6]&w);
     assign x[8]= (y[7]&w) | (y[8]&w);

     end
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3  
did you try it? –  jitter Oct 29 '09 at 1:43
    
Here is a test proving it works: EDA Playground –  Victor Lyuboslavsky Aug 1 '13 at 17:06

6 Answers 6

You can, it's called a "Procedural Continuous Assignment". It overrides ordinary procedural assignments, there doesn't seem to be a call for them in the code you've posted. I'm not sure if they're synthesisable, but I never have cause to use them anyway.

A note on your code - you're missing y from your sensitivity list: eg always @( w or y ) or always @(*) is safer.

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3  
Procedural continuous assignments have been deprecated as part of SystemVerilog. They just aren't a good idea as they aren't synthesizable and they can make a mess out of simulations. –  Steve K Dec 10 '09 at 10:15

Building upon Marty's answer, you should read section 9.3 of the IEEE Verilog Standard (1364-2005, for example), where it describes "Procedural Continuous Assignment". The spec allows for assign statements within an always block. However, from my experience, it is quite rare.

Another issue with your code is that it has compile errors with two different simulators that I tried. Both generate error messages that bit-selects or part-selects cannot be used on the left hand side of the assignment.

Another possible solution is to get rid of the always block, and just use simple continuous assignments.

input w;     
input [8:0] y;
output [8:0] x;
assign x[0] = 0;     
assign x[1]= (y[0]&~w) | (y[5]&~w) | (y[6]&~w) | (y[7]&~w) | (y[8]&~w); //B     
assign x[2]= (y[1]&~w); //C     
assign x[3]= (y[2]&~w); //D     
assign x[4]= (y[3]&~w) | (y[4]&~w); //E     
assign x[5]= (y[0]&w) | (y[1]&w) | (y[2]&w) | (y[3]&w) | (y[4]&w); //F     
assign x[6]= (y[5]&w);     
assign x[7]= (y[6]&w);     
assign x[8]= (y[7]&w) | (y[8]&w);
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,Isn't the code a regular Continuous Assign statement ? Can you give me some instances where these are necessary to use ? –  chitranna Mar 28 '13 at 11:03
    
I don't understand your questions. –  toolic Mar 28 '13 at 12:28
    
1.I mean to say, your code is now completely Continuous assignment right ? –  chitranna Mar 28 '13 at 17:56
    
Yes, my code only uses continuous assignments. –  toolic Mar 28 '13 at 17:57
    
And you mentioned its quite rare , I just want to know where can these Procedural Continuous Assignment become necessary to use ? –  chitranna Mar 28 '13 at 17:59

Yes, but you don't want to. Since x[] doesn't depend on x[] the order doesn't matter. Just use <= instead of assign =.

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There is no need using assign inside a procedural block (In this case Always)

Assign is a continuous assignment, and it has to go outside a procedural block.

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Assign is a continuous assignment statement which is used with wires in Verilog. assign statements don't go inside procedural blocks such as always. Registers can be given values in an always block.

Assign statements can be viewed as:

 always @(*)

statements for wires.

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  1. Thinking from the circuit level: this always(w) begin ..... end , so every code inside it will be activated whenever w is changed ie it falls or raise .
  2. assign statement requires pin/port which it assign to some wire or reg output
  3. its a complete combinational circuit I am unable to see how the same will only activate at w, that is who/what circuit will make it to only change when w either rises or fall
  4. anyway you cant assign a reg output to some wire/reg output using assign statement because as I said it requires you to put pin/port to be assigned only
  5. anyway if you go for basic verilog and not so called "Procedural Continuous Assignment" i guess its weird to use the same .
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