Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →
double **matrix = NULL;
matrix = (double **)malloc(sizeof(double *) * N);   // N is the size of the square matrix

for(int i=0; i<N; i++)
{
   matrix[i] = (double *)malloc(sizeof(double)*N);
}

// Works good up to the next part
for(int i=0; i<N; i++)
{
   for(int j=0; j<N; j++)
   {
      printf("Value: %f", matrix[i][j]);
   }
}

I'm trying to create a two dimensional array of doubles by using the method above (create an array of pointers, and then each pointer gets an array of doubles). However, as soon as I try to print the first element matrix[0][0], I get a seg fault. I've seen some other posts that do almost the same thing, except I can't get mine to work.

share|improve this question
2  
Is this meant to be C or C++ ? – Paul R May 7 '13 at 5:49
1  
Your code is fine. We are going to need to see an SSCCE (sscce.org) that actually demonstrates the problem. – NPE May 7 '13 at 5:55
1  
(1) Do not cast the result of malloc. This may suppress important compiler messages. (2) Build an sscce – n.m. May 7 '13 at 5:59
1  
@borisbn: wrong.Have you tried? Note this is C, not C++. – n.m. May 7 '13 at 6:03
1  
You have not posted the actual program that fails. No one therefore can tell why it fails. Please remember, SSCCE is not just a good idea, it's the law. – n.m. May 7 '13 at 6:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Syntax-wise, there is nothing wrong with your code. Either you aren't showing the whole code, or (less likely) the program ran out of memory and you didn't check the result of malloc to find out about that.

Program design-wise, you shouldn't use the fragmented pointer to pointer syntax; it creates N arrays all over the heap, instead of one single true 2D array allocated in adjacent memory cells. Heap fragmentation is bad for program performance and may cause various other problems (depending on system).

Casting the result of malloc is pointless in C. On old C compilers, it is even harmful.

You don't give the items of the array any values before printing them. To set them all to zero, either use memset or replace malloc with calloc.

You should fix the above mentioned issues and rewrite your code to this:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

double (*matrix)[N];  // an array pointer
matrix = calloc(1, sizeof(double[N][N])); // pointing at one true 2D array

if(matrix == NULL)
{
  // handle error
}


for(int i=0; i<N; i++)
{
  for(int j=0; j<N; j++)
  {
    printf("Value: %f", matrix[i][j]);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
IIRC the standard does not require the all-bits-zero memory pattern to correspond to zero (or any valid) floating point value. Though in practice this usually :-) works. – n.m. May 7 '13 at 6:36
1  
Thanks for the solution. What if I need N to be inputted by the user though? – stealthysnacks May 7 '13 at 6:40
    
@user2063561 That's not a problem, C supports variable length arrays so the above array pointer can be created with a variable size. – Lundin May 7 '13 at 8:01

Hi I have this c++ file and it works well till the end with g++ compiler.

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

int main(){
    int N = 10;
    double **matrix = NULL;
    matrix = (double **)malloc(sizeof(double *) * N);   // N is the size of the square matrix

    for(int i=0; i<N; i++)
    {
        matrix[i] = (double *)malloc(sizeof(double)*N);
    }

    for(int i=0; i<N; i++)
    {
        for(int j=0; j<N; j++)
        {
            printf("Value: %f", matrix[i][j]);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
it works well with visual studio compiler also!!! – raj raj May 7 '13 at 5:58
2  
why using namespace std ??? 1) this namespace wasn't using in your code 2) IT'S C QUESTION, NOT C++ !! – borisbn May 7 '13 at 5:59
1  
"you could always compile c in c++ way" - nope. C++ doesn't support dynamic arrays in stack - int N = 42; int array[ N ];. C++ doesn't support initializing structure fields by name. C++ doesn't support implicit casting from void* to other (as n.m. said in comments), etc. – borisbn May 7 '13 at 6:08
1  
Why would you use malloc in C++ and not new (or a vector, or a smart pointer)? It doesn't matter, since this answer is off-topic and should be deleted. – Lundin May 7 '13 at 6:15
1  
@hongtao (1) AFAIK this is an extension of C++, that supports by g++, but doesn't supports by other (2) this: struct struct_t struct_var = { .field1 = 42, .field10 = "abcde" }; – borisbn May 7 '13 at 6:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.