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Why does this code require the '&' in array syntax?

int (&returnArray(int (&arr)[42]))[42]
{
  return arr;
}

When i declare it like this

int (returnArray(int arr[42]))[42]
{
  return arr;
}

i get

error C2090: function returns array

But isn't this an array it was returning in the first example? Was it some sort of a reference to array?

I know i can also pass an array to a function, where it will decay to a pointer

int returnInt(int arr[42])
{
  return arr[0];
}

or pass it by reference

int returnInt(int (&arr)[42])
{
  return arr[0];
}

But why can't i return an array the same way it can be passed?

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@john I'd guess all C++ books worth their salt should mention array value semantics. –  Angew May 7 '13 at 7:42
    
possible duplicate of Why doesn't C++ support functions returning arrays? –  Tony D May 7 '13 at 7:46
    
i tried to edit the question to show that it's a little bit different from that one –  spiritwolfform May 7 '13 at 8:03
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
int (&returnArray(int (&arr)[42]))[42]

The first & means this would return a reference to the array.

This is required by the standard :

8.3.5 Functions §6 -

« Functions shall not have a return type of type array or function, although they may have a return type of type pointer or reference to such things. »

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The first function is not returning an array, it's returning a reference to an array. Arrays cannot be returned by value in C++.

These topics are generally well covered in good C++ books.

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