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I am trying to create 3 threads using a for loop. Following is my code snippet:

DWORD WINAPI ThreadProc0(LPVOID param)
{
   return 0; 
}
DWORD WINAPI ThreadProc1(LPVOID param)
{
    return 0;
}
DWORD WINAPI ThreadProc2(LPVOID param)
{
    return 0;
}

int WINAPI WinMain( HINSTANCE hInst, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nShowCmd )
{
   DWORD threadId = 0;
   int max_number=1;
   //Start the threads
   typedef DWORD (WINAPI * THREADPROCFN)(LPVOID lpParameter);
   THREADPROCFN function[3] = {ThreadProc0,ThreadProc1,ThreadProc2} ;
   for (int i = 0; i < max_number; i++) 
   {
      CreateThread( NULL,
                    0,
                    (LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE)&function[i],
                    (LPVOID) i,
                    0,
                    NULL
                   );
   }
}

The code is compiled successfully but when executed, the error is solution.exe has stopped working. When I Debug the code, I get the following error:

Unhandled exception at 0x0034fd00 in Solution.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation.

Waiting for help.

share|improve this question
1  
What happens if you change (LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE)&function[i], to (LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE)function[i], (i.e. don't take the address of a pointer to a function, take the pointer to the function) – ta.speot.is May 7 '13 at 7:48
1  
Note that your problem has nothing to do with creating multiple threads since max_number is set to 1 - you're only trying to create one thread. – Michael Burr May 7 '13 at 8:07
    
+1 for pointing out the problem :) – Ayse May 7 '13 at 8:14
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You likely want function[i] (the ith function pointer to a thread start routine) rather than &function[i] (a pointer to the ith function pointer to a thread start routine).

   typedef DWORD (WINAPI * THREADPROCFN)(LPVOID lpParameter);
   THREADPROCFN function[3] = {ThreadProc0,ThreadProc1,ThreadProc2} ;

   for (int i = 0; i < max_number; i++) 
   {
      CreateThread( NULL,
                    0,
                    //                      v Here!
                    (LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE)&function[i],
                    (LPVOID) i,
                    0,
                    NULL
                   );
   }

Being less familiar with C++ than I used to be, I think that after changing that the cast to LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE would become redundant.

share|improve this answer
    
It works now :) Thank you so much for the help! – Ayse May 7 '13 at 8:02
2  
Also - get rid of the unnecessary (LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE) cast. Without the cast, the compiler will give a warning about passing in the wrong type of pointer. The cast prevents the compiler from issuing a warning about the problem - it's effectively telling the compiler, "don't worry, I know what I'm doing even if it doesn't appear to make sense". If you pass in the correct pointer type, you won't need the cast and the compiler won't complain. – Michael Burr May 7 '13 at 8:05
1  
+1 for the explanation – Ayse May 7 '13 at 8:15

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