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What is the meaning of this initialization:

char arr[10] = { 0, };

I'm familiar with char arr[10] = {0}; which sets all the elements to zero, and with char arr[10] = {1,2}; which sets the first two elements to 1 and 2 (ascii) and the rest to 0. I'm not familiar with the format above. A quick test showed that it's probably just like char arr[10] = {0};, but is there other meaning I'm not aware of?

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possible duplicate of History of trailing comma in programming language grammars – Alok Save May 7 '13 at 8:35
    
possible duplicate of int a[] = {1,2,}; Weird comma allowed. Any particular reason? – hammar May 7 '13 at 8:37
    
Just redundant code. can be substituted by arr[10] = {}; – Nikolai May 7 '13 at 8:37
    
Possible duplicate with stackoverflow.com/questions/201101/… – MOHAMED May 7 '13 at 8:40
    
Refer to initializer-clause in the standard. – devnull May 7 '13 at 8:42
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, it's equivalent with the version without the trailing comma.

See this question for more discussion about trailing commas.

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From How to initialize an array in C:

Initialize all members to the same value:

int myArray[10] = { 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5 };

Elements with missing values will be initialized to 0:

int myArray[10] = { 1, 2 }; //initialize to 1,2,0,0,0...

So this will initialize all elements to 0:

int myArray[10] = { 0 }; //all elements 0

In C++, an empty initialization list will also initialize every element to 0:

int myArray[10] = {}; //all elements 0 in C++

Objects with static storage duration will initialize to 0 if no initializer is specified:

static int myArray[10]; //all elements 0

If your compiler is GCC you can use following syntax:

int array[1024] = {[0 ... 1023] = 5};
int A[10] = {[0 ... 4] = 5, [5 ... 9] = 3};
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As standard

A trailing comma may appear after the last expression in an array initializer and is ignored

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char arr[10] = { 0, }; and char arr[10] = {0} is same in this case.

But char arr[10] = {5, } is different. 5 will be stored in a[0] and remaining will be filled with zero.

I suggest not to use this for global variables, because it will increase the data section size.

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