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I am slightly new to javascript and I'm starting to understand how this coding mechanism works. I created a simple html form with a number of fields. I am using javascript to acquire the data from the field and validate it through a number of validation functions. The following code is the javascript I'm currently using:

function Validation()  
{  
    submit_name = document.getElementById('txt_Name').value;
    submit_surname = document.getElementById('txt_Surname').value;
    submit_mobilenumber = document.getElementById('MobileNumber').value;


    if(checkName(submit_name))
        {
    if(checkSurname(submit_surname))
            {
    if(checkMobile(submit_mobilenumber))
                {
                } 
            }
        }
    return false;
}

My question is this: In the case of this code, the main function(Validation()) will traverse all the individual functions one by one?

If for example the checkName() function returns false, will the other two validation functions checkSurname() and checkMobile() run or will the program stop at the first one?

The reason for my question is that after all the validation functions have returned through I want to add another function to save everything to a file. However this should only be done when all the forms have been validated. Any help is much appreciated thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
2  
If checkName() fails, then it would not enter the if block itself, i hope i answered your question. –  dreamweiver May 7 '13 at 9:47
1  
I would suggest you to do individual validation of the fields rather than nesting the conditions. –  dreamweiver May 7 '13 at 9:48
1  
:most definitely buddy –  dreamweiver May 7 '13 at 9:49
1  
If first function return false, your Validation function will return false, and code inside if statment will not execute. –  Sudz May 7 '13 at 9:50
1  
its bad interms of logic. when you do validation of the fields individually , then you can prompt the user all the validations errors at once, rather than prompting him to correct his name , then surname and so on . finally what matters is user`s experience,so do it wisely always –  dreamweiver May 7 '13 at 9:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would rather go with a validator that returns each one of the fields that contains an error, that way you can show the users which fields are wrongly filled out

function Validation() {
    var submit_name = document.getElementById('txt_Name').value,
        submit_surname = document.getElementById('txt_Surname').value,
        submit_mobilenumber = document.getElementById('MobileNumber').value,
        errors = [];

    if(!checkName(submit_name)) {
        errors.push({
            id: 'txt_Name',
            message: 'Name is required'
        });
    }

    if(!checkSurname(submit_surname)) {
        errors.push({
            id: 'txt_Surname',
            message: 'Surname is required'
        });
    }

    if(!checkMobile(submit_mobilenumber)) {
        errors.push({
            id: 'MobileNumber',
            message: 'Mobile number is required'
        });
    }

    return errors;
}

var errors = Validation();

if(errors.length === 0) {
    // No errors, do your stuff
} else {
    // Loop errors and do something
    for(var i = 0; i < errors.length; i++) {
        // can mark the element with document.getElementById(errors[i].id)
        alert(errors[i].message);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This improves a bit my answer adding some error messages for each element. Using mine you can just show something like 'Please, fill all inputs' or something like that. It's not bad at all both solutions, depends only on how much specific you want to be. Nice one mate +1 –  DaGLiMiOuX May 7 '13 at 10:04
    
Yeah it really depends on the needs of the developer. I just personally prefer to have something like this when I validate forms. –  thebreiflabb May 7 '13 at 10:14

The program will stop at the first method to return false, since all of them are included in each other. So if checkname() returns false, validation() will return false, and the same for the other functions.

if(checkName(submit_name))//if false, validate() returns false. if true, checksurname() called
    {
if(checkSurname(submit_surname))//if false, validate() returns false. if true, checkMobile() called
        {
if(checkMobile(submit_mobilenumber))//if false, validate() returns false
            {
            } 
        }
    }
return false;
}

Although as dreamweiver said, individual validation would be better:

if(checkname()&&checkmobile()&&checksurname())
{
return true;
}
else
{
return false;
}
share|improve this answer

An easy solution (without ignoring your other check functions) for your validation should be:

function Validation()  
{  
    var booleanValidation = false;
    var check_submit_name = checkName(document.getElementById('txt_Name').value);
    var check_submit_surname = checkSurname(document.getElementById('txt_Surname').value);
    var check_submit_mobilenumber = checkMobile(document.getElementById('MobileNumber').value);

    if (check_submit_name === false || check_submit_surname === false || check_submit_mobilenumber === false) {
        booleanValidaation = false;
    } else if (check_submit_name === true && check_submit_surname === true && check_submit_mobilenumber === true) {
        booleanValidaation = true;
    }

    return booleanValidation;
}
share|improve this answer

if checkName(submit_name) will return false then

if(checkName(submit_name)) will become if(false) so condition will be false so inside of if-condition code will be not execute. and execution will continuously.

This will apply for all if-condition.

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