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Is there an easy way of adding the counts for each category in two large tables in R?

... where the tables don't all have exactly the same values present (though they will mostly overlap):

Small example of what I am trying to do. Set up some data:

  x1 <- c(5, 3, 3, 6, 3, 3, 5, 5, 11, 2, 4, 9, 3, 5, 8, 2, 8, 5, 4, 8)
  x2 <- c(6, 10, 9, 17, 6, 7, 8, 11, 5, 12, 14, 5, 11, 7, 7)

  table(x1)
x1
 2  3  4  5  6  8  9 11 
 2  5  2  5  1  3  1  1 

 table(x2)
x2
 5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 14 17 
 2  2  3  1  1  1  2  1  1  1 

Now I want to combine these tables as if I had done table(c(x1,x2)), getting:

 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 14 17 
 2  5  2  7  3  3  4  2  1  3  1  1  1 

But now imagine x1 and x2 are gone (and are really large so I really don't want to recreate them from the tables and actually do table(c(x1,x2))), all I want is to take the tables t1 and t2 and add their (often very large) counts... which I can do in several really clunky ways.

However, this seems like it should be both very common and very easily-solved problem (indeed, I reckon that t1 + t2 ought to work for tables with categories of the same type) but searching for questions on every search term I could think of didn't find anything.

Have I missed a really simple and obvious way to do this?

Edit:

To clarify, something like this (which I did) is not 'simple and obvious' for what must be a very common operation with tables:

 m <- merge(t1,t2,by.x="x1",by.y="x2",all=TRUE)
 m[is.na(m)] <- 0
 oo <- order(m$x1)
 t12 <- m[oo,2]+m[oo,3]
 names(t12) <- m[oo,1]

In particular this is really no simpler nor easier to follow than the brute force approach.

share|improve this question
    
You should have a look at merge. –  Paul Hiemstra May 7 '13 at 10:00
    
@PaulHiemstra I did, before posting. I also played with it for a good while. I didn't see a good way to do what I wanted (more easily than doing it by brute force). It's possible I missed something there, but in that case ... I need more of a hint than that. –  Glen_b May 7 '13 at 10:05
1  
Your life will be much easier if you use data frames instead of tables. Tables are just named vectors, and in general, there are few R functions for aligning and combining named vectors, and many for data frames. –  hadley May 7 '13 at 12:35
    
@hadley thanks; I am using a table for no other reason than it's the output of table; I'm happy to as.data.frame them as needed, but (following combining them) the named vector is sufficient for what I need; as a broader principle I think it's good advice, but I rarely use tables myself. –  Glen_b May 7 '13 at 12:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Another way using tapply:

tapply(c(t1,t2), names(c(t1,t2)), sum)
# 10 11 12 14 17  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 
#  1  3  1  1  1  2  5  2  7  3  3  4  2 

Here's if you want a sorted output:

w <- c(t1,t2)
# edit: Following G.Grothendieck's suggestion to simplify it further
tapply(w, as.numeric(names(w)), sum)
#  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 14 17 
#  2  5  2  7  3  3  4  2  1  3  1  1  1 
share|improve this answer
    
+1 great idea, was looking for something like this. –  juba May 7 '13 at 10:21
    
Ah, neat. Yes, sorted output is needed. That second way will extend nicely to many tables with little effort. –  Glen_b May 7 '13 at 10:26

As @PaulHiemstra said, mergeshould do the job. I am not too familiar with it, but this code should work (though there might be more efficient ways to do it...)

x1 <- c(5, 3, 3, 6, 3, 3, 5, 5, 11, 2, 4, 9, 3, 5, 8, 2, 8, 5, 4, 8)
x2 <- c(6, 10, 9, 17, 6, 7, 8, 11, 5, 12, 14, 5, 11, 7, 7)

tx1 <- table(x1)
tx2 <- table(x2)

df1 <- data.frame(names=names(tx1),values=as.vector(tx1))
df2 <- data.frame(names=names(tx2),values=as.vector(tx2))

mdf12 <- merge(df1,df2,by="names",all=TRUE)
mdf12[is.na(mdf12)] <- 0

counts <- mdf12[,2] + mdf12[,3]
names(counts) <- mdf12[,1]

counts[order(as.numeric(names(counts)))]
table(c(x1,x2))

I don't like the is.na step, but I do not know how to make it, that there are 0in the first place instead of NA.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, yes, I actually did something quite close to this, but it seems ridiculously complicated for what must be a very frequent operation with table. –  Glen_b May 7 '13 at 10:19
    
Okay, sorry then to bring that. Maybe I can delete this post later, as you edited your post that you tried that complicated solution already before and @Arun posted a suitable solution (+1). –  Daniel Fischer May 7 '13 at 10:26
    
The fault here is mine; your answer covers a way to do it and in the absence of the information I later included in edit was a reasonable answer. I have upvoted accordingly. –  Glen_b May 7 '13 at 11:04

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