Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing a script that generates a list of millions of items and then generates another list based on the first list. It fills the memory very fast and the script can not continue. I thought it can be a good idea to store the list directly in a file and then loop directly on the file lines. What is the most efficient way to do this?

EDIT:

I am trying to generate a tree row by row. row5_nodes can get a million of items and I can't delete it because I use it to generate row6_nodes

import random

class Node:
    def __init__(self, id, name, parent=None):
        self.id = id
        self.name = name
        self.parent = parent

def write_roots(root_nodes, roots):
    global index
    index = 0
    for x in xrange(0,roots):
        node = Node(index,"root"+str(x))
        root_nodes.append(node);
        f.write(str(node.id)+","+str(node.name)+","+str(node.parent)+"\n")
        index += 1;
    return

def write_row(parent_nodes, new_nodes, children):
    global index
    for parent_node in parent_nodes:
        for x in xrange(0,children):
            node = Node(index,"cat"+str(parent_node.id)+"-"+str(x), parent_node.id)
            new_nodes.append(node);
            f.write(str(node.id)+","+str(node.name)+","+str(node.parent)+"\n")
            index += 1;
    return

f = open("data.csv", "wb")
roots = 1000
root_nodes =[]
row1_nodes =[]
row2_nodes =[]
row3_nodes =[]
row4_nodes =[]
row5_nodes =[]
row6_nodes =[]
row7_nodes =[]
row8_nodes =[]
row9_nodes =[]

write_roots(root_nodes, roots)
print "1"
write_row(root_nodes, row1_nodes, random.randrange(0,10))
print "2"
write_row(row1_nodes, row2_nodes, random.randrange(0,10))
print "3"
write_row(row2_nodes, row3_nodes, random.randrange(0,10))
print "4"
write_row(row3_nodes, row4_nodes, random.randrange(0,10))
print "5"
write_row(row4_nodes, row5_nodes, random.randrange(0,10))
print "6"
f.close()
share|improve this question
4  
Does the second process require random access to the first list, or can it process items in sequence? If so, use generators instead of materializing lists in memory. – Martijn Pieters May 7 '13 at 10:06
2  
Best solution would depend on what you plan to do with the lists after you've built them. It's probably worth elaborating on what you're trying to achieve. – Aya May 7 '13 at 10:08
    
What do you mean, what is the most efficient way to store a list in a file and then (later) loop through it again? I can only think of the obvious solution to just do it. What have you tried? And I’d agree, if you plan to work through the first list anyway, just do it directly and only store the end results off-memory. – poke May 7 '13 at 10:09
2  
You can edit your question to include additional information. Don't link to a gist, include the code in your post, see How do I format my code blocks? for help on how to format your code for inclusion. – Martijn Pieters May 7 '13 at 10:16
2  
What is the problem you are trying to solve with this? What do you mean "but loadfile is much much faster". Please describe the problem you are solving, instead of asking help with the solution you came up with. – Burhan Khalid May 7 '13 at 10:45
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your code is creating separate lists for each row of level of nodes, but you never need more than the previous row plus what you are generating now.

There is no need to keep that much information in memory, discard what you no longer need to use:

import csv
import random

class Node(object):
    _index = 0
    __slots__ = ('id', 'name', 'parent')

    def __init__(self, name, parent=None):
        self.id = Node._index
        Node._index += 1

        self.name = name
        self.parent = parent

def write_roots(roots, writer):
    nodes = []
    for x in xrange(roots):
        node = Node('root{}'.format(x))
        root_nodes.append(node)
        writer.writerow([node.id, node.name, ''])
    return nodes

def write_row(parent_nodes, writer, children):
    nodes = []
    for parent_node in parent_nodes:
        for x in xrange(children):
            node = Node('cat{}-{}'.format(parent_node.id, x), parent_node.id)
            nodes.append(node)
            writer.writerow([node.id, node.name, node.parent])
    return nodes

roots = 1000

with open("data.csv", "wb") as f:
    writer = csv.writer(f)

    nodes = write_roots(roots, writer)

    for i in xrange(9):
        print 'Writing row {}'.format(i + 1)
        nodes = write_row(nodes, writer, random.randrange(1, 11))

This probably still won't fit in memory as you are creating items exponentially; you are creating up to 1000 * 10 * 10 * 10 * 10 * 10 * 10 * 10 * 10 * 10 * 10 == 1000^9 == 1 trillion leaf nodes here! If you can fit 1.1 trillion nodes in memory, the above solution should work for you, but each node takes roughly 180 bytes of memory, plus the 1.1 trillion bytes for the list indices to hold the references, makes for a footprint of 48 terrabytes of information.

Before we solve that problem, I first want to point out that I've changed a few more things:

  • The Node class is now responsible for generating new ids, a class attribute Node._index is used instead of a global.
  • I used a __slots__ class attribute to save memory overhead.
  • The write_roots and write_row functions return the new set of nodes they generated instead of changing a mutable empty list you pass in.
  • The csv module is used; you are writing a CSV file, using this module makes that task vastly simpler.
  • The csv.writer() instance is passed to the functions as a parameter instead of the functions using the file object as a global.
  • I used randrange(1, 11) instead to avoid generating 0 children at a level. If you want a random depth, alter the outer loop (xrange(9)) instead.

If you are not fussed about the order nodes are written to the CSV file, you can switch to using generators instead. The following version writes nodes in depth first order as opposed to breath first in the first version, but uses vastly less memory:

import collections

def write_roots(roots, writer):
    for x in xrange(roots):
        node = Node('root{}'.format(x))
        writer.writerow([node.id, node.name, ''])
        yield node

def write_row(parent_nodes, writer, children):
    for parent_node in parent_nodes:
        for x in xrange(children):
            node = Node('cat{}-{}'.format(parent_node.id, x), parent_node.id)
            writer.writerow([node.id, node.name, node.parent])
            yield node

roots = 1000

with open("data.csv", "wb") as f:
    writer = csv.writer(f)

    nodes = write_roots(roots, writer)

    expected_total = leaf_nodes = roots
    for i in xrange(9):
        childcount = random.randrange(1, 11)
        leaf_nodes *= childcount
        expected_total += leaf_nodes
        print 'Generating row {} with {} nodes per parent'.format(i + 1, childcount)
        nodes = write_row(nodes, writer, childcount)

    print 'Writing out {} nodes'.format(expected_total)
    # we need to loop over the last `nodes` generator to have everything written to a file:
    collections.deque(nodes, maxlen=0)  # empty generator without storing anything

This solution only needs to keep up to 10 nodes at a time in memory, no more.

A test run with lower randrange() limits created half a million nodes in a fraction of a second. When the random number of children picked is closer to 10 for each depth, the generators take a little longer, but you can generate a full tree in an hour or so still.

Your next problem will be one of disk space. A CSV file containing some 8 billion nodes (an average case) should take a mere 250GB of storage for example. But, potentially, you can generate up to 1.111 trillion nodes, resulting in a 62TB CSV file.

share|improve this answer
    
Your answer doesn't solve the problem. The list gets very big at the end and eats all the memory. Thanks for refactoring the code :-) – madmed May 7 '13 at 10:41
    
@madmed: That is because you are generating too many leaf nodes here. I've proposed a second solution that'll only generate 10 nodes at a time at most. – Martijn Pieters May 7 '13 at 10:46
    
Thanks, it works! I didn't use collections/deque before so I will try to learn more about it. How can I track the progress of the write operation. – madmed May 7 '13 at 13:58
    
It is an efficiency trick; the deque is the fastest way to loop over the generator while ignoring the output. You don't need to know anything about what a deque does for this. – Martijn Pieters May 7 '13 at 14:07

Another depth-first, generator-based solution...

import random

next_id = 0

def gen(depth, parent_id=None):
    global next_id
    if parent_id is None:
        nodes = 1000
    else:
        nodes = random.randrange(0, 10)
    for i in range(nodes):
        next_id += 1
        if parent_id is None:
            name = 'root%d' % i
            yield '%d, %s, NULL' % (next_id, name)
        else:
            name = 'cat%d-%d' % (parent_id, next_id)
            yield '%d, %s, %s' % (next_id, name, parent_id)
        if depth > 1:
            for s in gen(depth-1, next_id):
                yield s

f = open('data.csv', 'wb')
for l in gen(6):
    f.write('%s\n') % l
f.close()
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.