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I tried to check my variable value with case statement and regular expression in sh script like the following code:

#!/bin/sh

test="test.1.testing"

case $test in
test.[5-9]+.testing) echo "value type 1";;
test.[1-4]+.testing) echo "value type 2";;
esac

This script doesn't work, have any solution with sh script (not bash)

I changed the symbol "+" by "*" and the script run succesfully, but I need to test with "+" (for 1 or more occurrence)

#!/bin/sh

test="test.1.testing"

case $test in
test.[5-9]*.testing) echo "value type 1";;
test.[1-4]*.testing) echo "value type 2";;
esac
share|improve this question
    
"doesn't work", means no response / error prompted ? –  Raptor May 7 '13 at 11:18
    
no error, empty result –  linuxcdeveloper May 7 '13 at 11:22
    
I think, the "+" symbol is treated as a simple character not a regex symbol –  linuxcdeveloper May 7 '13 at 11:23

1 Answer 1

Pattern matching in case is performed according to Pathname Expansion. Special symbols are *, ?, […].

Symbol + is treated as simple character, not a quantifier for [].

The same is true for *; here it's not a regex quantifier for [] but rather a separate pattern symbol. In your case, it matches zero characters which results in successful pattern match. You can check this by removing * from case.

Thus you should use the following code:

#!/bin/sh

test="test.1.testing"

case $test in
    test.[5-9].testing) echo "value type 1";;
    test.[1-4].testing) echo "value type 2";;
esac
share|improve this answer
    
you're right, have you any solution to do it with case statement? –  linuxcdeveloper May 9 '13 at 10:16
    
@AhmedZRIBI I edited my answer and added the working code. If you need to match test.11.testing too, then I'd suggest using a tool with more sophisticated regular expressions, for example perl, grep, sed. Additionally, if you allow two digits, then what case does test.15.testing fall in? If only the first digit is important, add * after ] like you did. Yet such construct would also allow .1a. as well as .15.; so if you want to ensure there are only digits, you have to use another tool to check the value. –  Alexey Ivanov May 9 '13 at 14:50

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