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The C++ program

#include <complex>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  std::complex<double> z(0,2);
  int n = 3;
  std::cout << z * n << std::endl;
}

yields an error: no match for ‘operator*’ in ‘z * n’. Why?

I'm compiling with g++ 4.4.1. Perhaps the compiler is just following the C++ standard, in which case my question is: why does the standard not allow this?

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2 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

This works:

#include <complex>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::complex<double> z(0,2);
    double n = 3.0; // Note, double
    std::cout << z * n << std::endl;
}

Because complex is composed of doubles, it multiplies with doubles. Looking at the declaration:

template <typename T>
inline complex<T> operator*(const complex<T>&, const T&);

(The following is thanks to dribeas) The compiler is not allowed to make implicit type conversions during template deduction, so by passing a complex with T being double, and then another T being int, when trying to match the function treating T as double causes the second argument to mis-match, and vice-versa.

For what you want to work, it would have to have a function defined similar to this:

template <typename T, typename U>
inline std::complex<T> operator*(std::complex<T> lhs, const U& rhs)
{
    return lhs *= rhs;
}

Which allows the function to take differing types, which allows the cast to be done when calling operator*=.

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I think its because complex is a class and the * is overloaded for that class, its not a primitive so it doesn't follow casting rules in the compiler –  ldog Oct 29 '09 at 5:58
    
Thanks, I've corrected the mistake about ambiguity, and my failure to code the operator correctly. (Should have done the second, but the first is a lesson to me.) –  GManNickG Oct 29 '09 at 7:03
    
The implementation of the operator you initially provided was not incorrect, just improvable (and in a regular project the difference would be rather small). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 29 '09 at 7:16
    
To me, if it's improvable it's not correct. I usually do code my operators like that, so I'd consider it a mistake. –  GManNickG Oct 29 '09 at 7:18
    
"The compiler is not allowed to make implicit type conversions during template deduction" is the part that I missed. Everybody involved, thanks for the answer. –  Jitse Niesen Oct 29 '09 at 20:08
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std::complex<T>'s operators are defined to take as their arguments other complex<T> instances. The route from an int via a double to a complex<double> is just marginally too contorted / convoluted for the C++ language to follow it according to the standard (and with the huge complications already arising from free-wheeling conversions and cohercions it's hard to criticize that aspect of the standard). I guess the super-special case of complex<double> allowing uncasted ints as operands to its operators was just not deemed frequent and important enough to warrant specifying template specializations for that extremely individual case, considering how trivially easy it is for the programmer to cast the int to double when that's what they actually want!-)

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-1: The standard provides symmetric free functions to multiply an std::complex<T> by T. (C++03, 26.2.6 [lib.complex.ops] Complex non-member operations) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 29 '09 at 6:58
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