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In one of the assignments, I had to override the superclass's getter method for the game logic (so the method will get the subclass of the game logic instead of the original one).

CardGameViewController.h:

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import "Deck.h"
#import "CardGame.h"

@interface CardGameViewController : UIViewController
@property (nonatomic) NSUInteger startingCardCount; // abstract
@property (strong, nonatomic) CardGame *game;

- (Deck *)createDeck; // abstract
- (void)updateCell:(UICollectionViewCell *)cell usingCard:(Card *)Card; // abstract

@end

CardGameViewController.m:

#import "CardGameViewController.h"

...

// no @synthesize here, but works fine.

- (CardGame *)game
{
    if (!_game) _game = [[CardGame alloc] initWithCardCount:self.startingCardCount
                                                 usingDeck:[self createDeck]];
    return _game;
}

...

@end

SetCardGameViewController.m:

...

@interface TSSetCardGameViewController()

@property (strong, nonatomic) CardGame *game;

@end

@implementation TSSetCardGameViewController

@synthesize game = _game; // Compiler *will* complain if this line is commented out.

- (CardGame *)game
{
    if (!_game) _game = [[SetCardGame alloc] initWithCardCount:self.startingCardCount
                                                  usingDeck:[self createDeck]];
    return _game;
}

...

@end

Then I got "Use of undeclared identifier" for "_game". so I declared

@property (strong, nonatomic) CardGame *game;

But I got the same error, so I used "self.game" instead, which caused a bad access exception. I couldn't find anything on Google, so I tinkered around until I found that this solves the problem:

@synthesize game = _game;

Now, my question is why. My understanding is the new version of Xcode does the synthesizing for me, unless I override both its getter and setter. I did override the getter, but not the setter, so Xcode technically should have included it automatically. The proof is that Xcode did not complain until I subclassed CardGameViewController and specifically overrode the getter method. (FYI neither CardGameViewController nor its subclass had a setter method for *game)

So I'm a little confused. Please help!

share|improve this question
    
It's not Xcode that does the auto-synthesize, it's the compiler. –  user529758 May 7 '13 at 12:03
    
And what's the property for SetCardGame? –  ott-- May 7 '13 at 12:06
    
ott// I'm not sure what you're asking. It's a subclass of CardGame, and has a bunch of methods to calculate the score of the card game. –  Skishnot May 7 '13 at 12:13
    
hmm, now that you mention it, there's no declaration of SetCardGame. I guess I assumed it'd work because it's technically a subclass of CardGame. But Xcode didn't say anything about the return type –  Skishnot May 7 '13 at 12:17
    
Did you declare @property (strong, nonatomic) CardGame *game; in CardGameViewController.h? –  neilvillareal May 7 '13 at 12:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem here is that you have two versions of _game. Since the introduction of the new ABI (64-bit Mac and all iOS), each subclass can create its own ivars without tromping all over its superclass's ivars (even if they're named the same). And ivars created by @synthesize are private. Now hold that thought and let's see what's happening:

  • In your superclass, you declare a property that has a getter and setter (though you almost certainly don't mean to have a setter…) You override the getter. The compiler says "but you still want me to create a setter for you, so I'll create an ivar to match it."

  • In your subclass, you declare no new properties. You may think you do, but it's just the same property that comes from the superclass; it's not a new property. There's already a getter and setter in the superclass, so there's no need for the compiler to create an ivar.

  • You then reference an ivar that does not exist in your subclass. It only exists as a private ivar in the superclass. The compiler can't see that (and wouldn't let you access it even if it could).

The typical solution to this problem is, rather than overriding -game, just provide a class method called +gameClass and have it return the correct class to instantiate. (See +layerClass in UIView for an example of this pattern.)

share|improve this answer
    
thank you so much! –  Skishnot May 7 '13 at 15:16

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