Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a question about Fortran and correct allocation of allocatable user derived types.

Here is my code:

module polynom_mod
 implicit none

 type monomial
  integer,dimension(2) :: exponent
 end type

type polynom
  real, allocatable, dimension(:) :: coeff
  type(monomial),allocatable, dimension(:)   :: monom
  logical :: allocated
 !recursive type
  type(polynom),pointer :: p_dx,p_dy
 contains
  procedure :: init
  procedure :: init_dx
end type

here I want to derive a type polynom where I can do things like:

p%coeff(1)=1.0 
p%monom(1)%exponent(1)=2

and something like:

p%p_dx%coeff(1)=1.0 
p%p_dx%monom(1)%exponent(1)=2

so I wrote some init type-bound procedures where I can initialize my and allocate my types:

contains

function init(this,num) result(stat)
  implicit none
  integer, intent(in)      :: num
  class(polynom),intent(inout) :: this
  logical :: stat

  allocate(this%coeff(num))
  allocate(this%monom(num))

  this%allocated = .TRUE.
  stat = .TRUE.
end function

function init_dx(this,num) result(stat)
  implicit none

  integer, intent(in)      :: num
  class(polynom),intent(inout) :: this

  logical :: stat

  allocate(this%p_dx%coeff(num))
  allocate(this%p_dx%monom(num))

  this%p_dx%allocated = .TRUE.
  stat = .TRUE.
 end function   
end module

program testpolytype
 use polynom_mod

 type(polynom) :: p

 if(p%init(2)) then
  print *,"Polynom allocated!"
 end if

 if(p%p_dx%init_dx(2)) then
  print *,"Polynom_dx allocated!"
 end if

end program

This will compile with gfortran 4.6.3 but when I ran it I got a segmentation fault!

Is there a way to allocate recursive allocatable types ?

Thank you Jan

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The superficial problem with your code is that, when the expression p%p_dx%init_dx(2) is computed the pointer component p%p_dx is undefined, and the segmentation fault is raised. Note that the pointer is undefined and not just not associated.

Right now I'm struggling to come up with a quick fix. The long fix would be to address what I think is a serious flaw in your approach; note that this is my opinion rather than a matter of black or white so read on only if you care for my input.

The functions init and init_dx are not free of side-effects, indeed they could be said to be almost all side-effect -- they return a logical value and, as a side-effect, initialise a polynom variable. The program seems to have no way to initialise a polynom without evaluating init and no way to evaluate init without wrapping it into a statement such as

if (p%init(2)) then
end if

You could, I suppose, rewrite these initialisation functions as subroutines, perhaps with a signature such as

call initialise_polynom(p,2)

This would, at least, remove the stain of impure functions from your code. But a better approach would be to write a function such as:

function new_poly(num)
  implicit none
  integer, intent(in) :: num
  type(polynom) :: new_poly
  allocate(new_poly%coeff(num))
  allocate(new_poly%monom(num))
  allocate(new_poly%p_dx)
end function new_poly

which

a) returns a new polynom; and

b) allocates component p_dx; and

c) is side-effect free.

You can then create a new polynom with an expression such as

p = new_poly(3)

and initialise the component with an expression such as

p%p_dx = new_poly(3)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank You! You are right with the uninitialized pointer which causes the segmentation fault. –  Jan Wittke May 8 '13 at 10:47
add comment

Answering my own question, I came up with an other solution witch also works without pointers but it's not so elegant like Marks one.

Define an other type :

type p_dx
 real, allocatable, dimension(:) :: coeff
 type(monomial),allocatable, dimension(:)   :: monom
 logical :: allocated
end type

and then use this with :

type polynom
 real, allocatable, dimension(:) :: coeff
 type(monomial),allocatable, dimension(:)   :: monom
 type(p_dx) :: dx
 logical :: allocated
contains
 procedure     :: init
end type

so you can do something like:

type(polynom) :: p

p%init(2)
p%dx%init_dx(3)
share|improve this answer
    
I'd avoid a variable such as your logical :: allocated which is only going to cause grief and desperation when you confuse it with the intrinsic allocated function. –  High Performance Mark May 8 '13 at 11:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.