Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Let say I have abstract class called: Tenant and Customer. The tenant in this case is like owner of the application for multi tenant application model

The relationship between these 2 class are Many to One relationship.

public abstract class Tenant
{
  protected Int32 id;
  protected String name;

  public Int32 ID { get; set; }
  public String Name { get; set; }

  public abstract bool Add();
  public abstract bool Update();
  public abstract bool Delete(); 
}

public class ApplicationTenant: Tenant
{
  public ApplicationTenant() { }

  public override Int64 ID
  {
     get { return id; }
     set { id = value; }
  }

  public override String Name
  {
     get { return name; }
     set { name= value; }
  }

  ...

}

public abstract class Customer
{
  protected Int32 id;
  protected String name;
  protected Tenant tenant;

  public Int32 ID { get; set; }
  public String Name { get; set; }
  public Tenant Tenant { get; set; }

  public abstract bool Add();
  public abstract bool Update();
  public abstract bool Delete(); 
}

public class CorporateCustomer : Customer
{
  public CorporateCustomer () { }

  public override Int64 ID
  {
     get { return id; }
     set { id = value; }
  }

  public override String Name
  {
     get { return name; }
     set { name= value; }
  }

  public override Tenant Tenant
  {
     get { return tenant; }
     set { tenant= value; }
  }


  ...

}

The problem with this design is that when you do:

CorporateCustomer customer = new CorporateCustomer();
customer.Tenant.ID = xx

Tenant in this case is always referencing the public Tenant Tenant { get; set; } which is actually what I want is the one from ApplicationTenant NOT the one abstract one.

Should I remove any abstraction in this class Customer if it's relating other objects? What is your thought?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Or use generics in your Customer class.

public abstract class Customer<TTenant> where TTenant: Tenant
{
  protected Int32 id;
  protected String name;
  protected TTenant tenant;

  public Int32 ID { get; set; }
  public String Name { get; set; }
  public TTenant Tenant { get; set; }

  public abstract bool Add();
  public abstract bool Update();
  public abstract bool Delete(); 
}
share|improve this answer

Do you mean you want to access the concrete implementation ApplicationTenant Properties rather than just getting the Tenant abstract class? If you are certain the Tenant is of type ApplicationTenant, you can just cast it i.e.

ApplicationTenant appTenant = (ApplicationTenant)customer.Tenant;

then use the features of ApplicationTenant.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand this one. But what I mean in the design, if you force to public Tenant Tenant { get; set; } in the Customer absract class. It means that CorporateCustomer class has in override this Tenant properties which kind redundancy (not being used) because the reference is going to TEnant class instead of ApplicationTenant. Hope this clear. –  dcalliances Oct 30 '09 at 1:14
    
Without having tested your code, there are a couple of things I notice then. a) your override is an Int64 whilst the original is an Int32. Therefore, I don't think it is an actual override. Override has to have the exact same header (return type + parameters), doesn't it? b) Your override is actually doing nothing, so why even have it? Need a clearer example c) Even if your override was being called, it is saving back to an Int32 anyway making it redundant. Need a clearer example where the override is actually doing something. –  mike Oct 30 '09 at 2:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.