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I thought there were no differences between methods declared within a class << self block and those declared with a self. prefix, but there are:

module A
  VAR = 'some_constant'
end

class B
  extend A

  class << self
    def m1
      puts VAR
    end
  end

  def self.m2
    puts VAR
  end
end

B.m1 # => OK
B.m2 # => uninitialized constant B::VAR

Why are constants of A available in m1 but not in m2?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In Ruby, constant lookup is not the same as method lookup. For method lookup, calling foo is always the same as calling self.foo (assuming it isn't private). Calling a constant FOO is very different from self::FOO or singleton_class::FOO.

Using an unqualified constant (e.g. FOO) will do a lookup in the currently opened modules. A module is opened with module Mod, class Klass, class << obj, or module_eval and variants. When defining m1, these are B, and then B.singleton_class. When defining m2, only B is opened.

module Foo
  X = 42
  class Bar
    def self.hello
      X
    end
  end
end

In this code, Foo::Bar.hello will return 42, even though X is not a constant of Bar, its singleton class or ancestor. Also, if you later add a constant X to Bar, then that value will be returned. Finally, the following definition is not equivalent:

module Foo
  X = 42
end

class Foo::Bar
  def self.hello
    X
  end
end

Foo::Bar.hello # => uninitialized constant Foo::Bar::X

Indeed, when hello is defined, only the class Foo::Bar is opened, while in the previous example, both Foo and Foo::Bar where opened.

A last example, to show the difference an explicit scope can have with inheritance:

class Base
  X = 42
  def self.foo
    X
  end
  def self.bar
    self::X
  end
end

class Parent < Base
  X = :other
end

Parent.foo # => 42
Parent.bar # => :other

In your case, you probably want to include your module, instead of extending it, no?

Otherwise, you could use singleton_class::VAR, your code will work as you expect it.

module A
  VAR = 'some_constant'
end

class B
  extend A

  class << self
    def m1
      puts singleton_class::VAR # not necessary here, as singleton_class is opened
    end
  end

  def self.m2
    puts singleton_class::VAR # necessary here!
  end
end

B.m1 # => OK
B.m2 # => OK
share|improve this answer
    
what is f1 and f2? can you just add some lines there? What is "currently opened modules"? –  Arup Rakshit May 8 '13 at 5:37
    
@Priti: Answer edited, tks –  Marc-André Lafortune May 8 '13 at 14:23

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