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After reading Hidden Features and Dark Corners of C++/STL on comp.lang.c++.moderated, I was completely surprised that the following snippet compiled and worked in both Visual Studio 2008 and G++ 4.4.

Here's the code:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int x = 10;
    while (x --> 0) // x goes to 0
    {
        printf("%d ", x);
    }
}

I'd assume this is C, since it works in GCC as well. Where is this defined in the standard, and where has it come from?

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571  
Behold the confusion that two little parenthesis could have prevented :) +1 for being disciplined enough to say WTF and ask :) –  Tim Post Oct 29 '09 at 7:08
198  
Or even just proper spacing... I don't think I've ever seen a space between the variable and either ++ or -- before... –  Matthew Scharley Oct 29 '09 at 7:09
600  
This "goes to" operator can be reverted ( 0 <-- x ). And also there is a "runs to" operator ( 0 <---- x ). Geez, the funniest thing I've ever heard of c++ syntax =) +1 for the question. –  SadSido Oct 29 '09 at 7:27
65  
Funnily enough, although the interpretation is very wrong, it does describe what the code does correctly. :) –  Noldorin Nov 11 '09 at 13:51
424  
Imagine the new syntax possibilities: #define upto ++<, #define downto -->. If you're feeling evil, you can do #define for while( and #define do ) { (and #define done ;}) and write for x downto 0 do printf("%d\n", x) done Oh, the humanity... –  Chris Lutz Mar 4 '10 at 7:07

17 Answers 17

up vote 4317 down vote accepted
+50

--> is not an operator. It is in fact two separate operators, -- and >.

The conditional's code decrements x, while returning x's original (not decremented) value, and then compares the original value with 0 using the > operator.

To better understand, the statement could be written as follows:

while( (x--) > 0 )
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84  
Then again, it does kind of look like some kind of range operator in that context. –  Charles Salvia Oct 29 '09 at 7:14
32  
I agree, I should have seen it. Though these are all just excuses, it's probably the combination of me being tired and seeing it on comp.lang.c++ (automatic "trust" in words), not to mention the alarm of another poster. –  GManNickG Oct 29 '09 at 7:15
31  
this answer is only partly right: the variable x is post decremented AFTER being compared to 0 –  knittl Oct 29 '09 at 8:26
30  
Saying that x is post-decremented and then compared to 0 is the same as saying x is decremented after being compared to 0 –  Charles Salvia Oct 29 '09 at 8:35
54  
@knittl: Your comment isn't any better. The return value of the subexpression "x--" is defined to be the old value. When the actual decrement is happening doesn't matter because you are not allowed to access x once more before the next sequence point. In case x is an object of a user-defined type, the postfix decrement will be a function call which is supposed to decrement the object and return a copy of the previous value. Since there are two sequence points (entering and leaving the function) involved, the decrement would come before the comparison in that case (user-defined types). –  sellibitze Oct 29 '09 at 8:45

That's a very complicated operator, so even ISO/IEC JTC1 (Joint Technical Committee 1) placed its description in two different parts of the C++ Standard.

Joking aside, they are two different operators: -- and > described respectively in §5.2.6/2 and §5.9 of the C++03 Standard.

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It's equivalent to

while (x-- > 0)
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8  
While this might help many to understand the code, a few lines to explain it properly would be helpful. –  Dukeling May 22 at 12:57

It's

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
     int x = 10;

     while( x-- > 0 ) // x goes to 0
     {
       printf("%d ", x);
     }

     return 0;
}

Just the space make the things look funny, -- decrements and > compares.

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The usage of --> has historical relevance. Decrementing was (and still is in some cases), faster than incrementing on the x86 architecture. Using --> suggests that x is going to 0, and appeals to those with mathematical backgrounds.

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295  
Not exactly true. Decrementing and Incrementing take the same amount of time, the benefit of this is that comparison to zero is very fast compared to comparison versus a variable. This is true for many architectures, not just x86. Anything with a JZ instruction (jump if zero). Poking around you can find many "for" loops that are written backwards to save cycles on the compare. This is particularly fast on x86 as the act of decrementing the variable set the zero flag appropriately, so you could then branch without having to explicitly compare the variable. –  burito Dec 30 '09 at 5:16
11  
Well, decrementing toward zero means you only have to compare against 0 per loop iteration, while iterating toward n means comparing with n each iteration. The former tends to be easier (and on some architectures, is automatically tested after every data register operation). –  Joey Adams Apr 12 '10 at 15:07
1  
@burrito Although I don't disagree, loops conditioned on non-zero values generally get predicted near perfectly. –  Duncan Jan 11 '14 at 9:05
2  
@Konerak Going from an O(N) operation to an O(1) one is almost always preferable. –  Alice Mar 25 '14 at 4:26
2  
Increment and decrement are equally fast, probably on all platforms (definitely on x86). The difference is in testing the loop end condition. To see if the counter has reached zero is practically free - when you decrement a value, a zero flag is set in processor and to detect the end condition you just need to check that flag whereas when you increment a comparison operation is required before end condition can be detected. –  lego Feb 18 at 11:14

One book I read (I don't remember correctly which book) stated: Compilers try to parse expressions to the biggest token by using the left right rule.

In this case, the expression:

x-->0

Parses to biggest tokens:

token 1: x
token 2: --
token 3: >
token 4: 0
conclude: x-- > 0

The same rule applies to this expression:

a-----b

After parse:

token 1: a
token 2: --
token 3: --
token 4: -
token 5: b
conclude: (a--)-- - b

I hope this helps to understand the complicated expression ^^

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64  
Your second explanation is not correct. The compiler will see a-----b and think (a--)-- - b, which does not compile because a-- does not return an lvalue. –  DoctorT May 5 '10 at 15:26
14  
Additionally, x and -- are two separate tokens. –  Roland Illig Jul 2 '10 at 19:20
3  
This is known as Maximal munch. –  RJFalconer Mar 13 '14 at 11:09
9  
@DoctorT: it passes the lexer. only semantic pass is capable of emmiting that error. so his explanation is correct. –  v.oddou Sep 1 '14 at 3:34
2  
As long as you think --> is an operator (which is what's implied by having the question that was asked), this answer isn't helpful at all - you'll think token 2 is -->, not just --. If you know that --> isn't an operator, you probably don't have a problem understanding the code in the question, so, unless you have a completely different question, I'm not really sure how this could be useful. –  Dukeling May 22 at 12:33

This is exactly the same as

while (x--)
{
   printf("%d ", x);
}

for non-negative numbers

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23  
Depends on the initial value of x –  Artelius May 2 '10 at 4:46
10  
@DoctorT you mean "non-negative". –  user142019 Jun 5 '11 at 21:38
70  
Shouldn't this be for(--x++;--x;++x--)? –  Mateen Ulhaq Dec 4 '11 at 21:32
6  
@DoctorT that's what unsigned is for –  Cole Johnson Mar 23 '13 at 18:39
2  
@muntoo There was something with lvalues. –  harper Apr 25 '13 at 4:25

Anyway, we have a "goes to" operator now. "-->" is easy to be remembered as a direction, and "while x goes to zero" is meaning-straight.

Furthermore, it is a little more efficient than "for (x = 10; x > 0; x --)" on some platforms.

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8  
Goes to cant be true always especially when value of x is negative. –  Ganesh Gopalasubramanian Nov 13 '09 at 3:22
212  
It will get there eventually. –  Josh Lee Dec 30 '09 at 2:25
10  
The other version does not do the same thing - with for (size_t x=10; x-->0; ) the body of the loop is executed with 9,8,..,0 whereas the other version has 10,9,..,1. It's quite tricky to exit a loop down to zero with an unsigned variable otherwise. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 21 '10 at 8:57
2  
I think this is a little bit misleading... We don't have a literally "goes to" operator, since we need another ++> to do the incremental work. –  tslmy Jun 15 '13 at 2:49
11  
@Josh: actually, overflow gives undefined behavior for int, so it could just as easily eat your dog as take x to zero if it starts out negative. –  SamB Dec 6 '13 at 6:57

This code first compares x and 0 and then decrement x. (Also said in the first answer: You're post-decrementing x and then comparing x and 0 with the > operator.) See the output of this code:

9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

We now first compare and then decrement by see 0 in the output.

If we want to first decrement and then compare, use this code:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
    int x = 10;

    while( --x> 0 ) // x goes to 0
    {
        printf("%d ", x);
    }

    return 0;
}

That output is:

9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
share|improve this answer

x can go to zero even faster in opposite direction

int x = 10;

while( 0 <---- x )
{
   printf("%d ", x);
}

8 6 4 2

You can control speed with an arrow!

int x = 100;

while( 0 <-------------------- x )
{
   printf("%d ", x);
}

90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10

;)

share|improve this answer
    
which operating system, this type of output generated, i am using a ubuntu 12.04 in that i had a error message –  Bhuvanesh Jan 19 at 12:13
    
@Bhuvanesh operating system is irrelevant. This is simple C++ code (using printf(), because OP uses it), which should compile everywhere, so it must be your error. coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/f5fdc710da0398c9 –  doc Jan 19 at 13:03
3  
Though it should be obvious, to everyone new to C++ reading this: don't do it. Just use augmented assignment if you have need to increment/decrement by more than one. –  Blimeo Mar 26 at 2:41

My compiler will print out 9876543210 when I run this code.

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
    int x = 10;

    while( x --> 0 ) // x goes to 0
    {
        std::cout << x;
    }
}

As expected. The while( x-- > 0 ) actually means while( x > 0). The x-- post decrements x.

while( x > 0 ) 
{
    x--;
    std::cout << x;
}

is a different way of writing the same thing.

It is nice that the original looks like "while x goes to 0" though.

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1  
The result is only undefined when you're incrementing/decrementing the same variable more than once in the same statement. It doesn't apply to this situation. –  DoctorT May 5 '10 at 15:30
10  
Wow, my compiler merely compiles. –  Walter Oct 4 '14 at 13:15
1  
while( x-- > 0 ) actually means while( x > 0) - I'm not sure what you were trying to say there, but the way you phrased it implies the -- has no meaning whatsoever, which is obviously very wrong. –  Dukeling May 22 at 12:28

There is a space missing between -- and >. x is post decremented, that is, decremented after checking the condition x>0 ?.

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20  
The space is not missing - C(++) ignores whitespace. –  user529758 Aug 2 '12 at 19:16
12  
@H2CO3 This isn't true in general. There are places where white space must be used to separate tokens, e.g. in #define foo() versus #define foo (). –  Jens Apr 25 '13 at 21:16
12  
@Jens How about: "The space is not missing - C(++) ignores unnecessary white space."? –  Kevin P. Rice Dec 4 '13 at 20:35

-- is the decrement operator and > is the greater-than operator.

The two operators are applied as a single one like -->.

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Actually, x is post-decrementing and with that condition is being checked. It's not -->, it's (x--) > 0

Note: value of x is changed after the condition is checked, because it post-decrementing. Some similar cases can also occur, for example:

-->    x-->0
++>    x++>0
-->=   x-->=0
++>=   x++>=0
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1  
Except that ++> can hardly be used in a while(). A "goes up to..." operator would be ++<, which doesn't look anywhere as nice. The operator --> is a happy coincidence. –  Florian F Sep 1 '14 at 9:46
    
Could while (0 <-- x) also work, then? –  Ben C. R. Leggiero Jun 15 at 14:00

It's a combination of two operators. First -- is for decrementing the value, and > is for checking whether the value is greater than the right-hand operand.

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int x = 10;

    while (x-- > 0)
        printf("%d ",x);

    return 0;
}

The output will be:

9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0            
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C and C++ obey the "maximum munch" rule. The same way a---b is translated to (a--) - b, in your case x-->0 translates to (x--)>0.

What the rule says essentially is that going left to right, expressions are formed by taking the maximum of characters which will form an valid expression.

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4  
Never heard of the maximum munch rule, but I will remember it. Thanks. –  ryyker Jul 16 '14 at 23:49
1  
Which is what the OP assumed: that "((a)-->)" was the maximal munch. It turns out that the OP's original assumption was incorrect: "-->" is not a maximum valid operator. –  david Aug 28 '14 at 0:41
    
Also known as greedy parsing, if I recall correctly. –  Roy Tinker Jul 11 at 1:04

protected by Kobi Feb 10 '11 at 6:48

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