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I'm trying to combine a transparent CSS gradient and a background image, and fail gracefully in browsers that don't support the gradient.

I have this CSS, which works fine in Webkit browsers, but seems to be totally ignored by non-Webkit browsers (e.g. Firefox), which display a white background:

body {
  height:100%;
  -webkit-font-smoothing: subpixel-antialiased;
  padding-top: 2%;
  padding-bottom: 2%;
  background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, right top,
    from(rgba(0,0,0,0.4)), to(rgba(0,0,0,0.4)),
    color-stop(0.03, rgba(0,0,0,0.2)),
    color-stop(0.06, transparent),
    color-stop(0.94, transparent),
    color-stop(0.97, rgba(0,0,0,0.2))),
     url(../img/myimg.jpg) repeat;
}

However, if I set background to:

  background: url(../img/myimg.jpg) repeat;

instead, it works fine in Firefox. Shouldn't Firefox just ignore the -webkit-gradient part of the rule? How can I make this Firefox-friendly?

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You are yourself answering this question Shouldn't Firefox just ignore the -webkit-gradient part of the rule you are not using linear-gradient or -moz-linear property so how do you expect firefox to support gradients? –  Mr. Alien May 7 '13 at 13:53
    
? Yes, but the problem is that Firefox doesn't see the url part of the rule when the -webkit-gradient is present. I'd like it to fall back to the url, but it doesn't. –  Richard May 7 '13 at 13:54
    
Go here... css3.me create a gradient and click get code. Note the result you get. Multiple background-image declarations. Simply add beneath your current background: another one with the URL only. Problem solved. –  Michael May 7 '13 at 13:56
    
Is there a reason you're using an image rather than actually gradients for firefox? If you use plain linear gradients, it'll work in IE10 and firefox, and you can use the webkit non-standard workaround too until webkit/blink support the standard syntax. –  Eamon Nerbonne May 7 '13 at 14:12
    
You need ugly duplication, like this: background: url(../img/myimg.jpg); background: -webkit-gradient(<long gradient code here>), url(../img/myimg.jpg); background: -moz-linear-gradient(<long moz-compatible gradient code here>), url(../img/myimg.jpg); background-repeat: repeat;. –  thirtydot May 7 '13 at 14:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should try to use the standard, unprefixed linear gradient syntax - this is now quite widely supported: IE10, chrome 26 (current is 27), firefox 16 (current is 20), opera 12.1 (the latest version). To support mobile browsers you'll additionally need the webkit-prefixed version.

Using your example gradient, the standard syntax is...

background: linear-gradient(to left, 
    rgba(0,0,0,0.4), rgba(0,0,0,0.0) 6%, rgba(0,0,0,0.0) 94%, rgba(0,0,0,0.4));

You can see this in a jsfiddle example.

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If the value is invalid, firefox won't read anything after; here your background is ignored as -webkit is an unknown property value for firefox, so in your example, -webkit is an unknown value for firefox at first so it will skip that and move to next property in that class..Say for example

background: asadsa, url('http://images.google.co.in/intl/en_ALL/images/logos/images_logo_lg.gif'); 
/* asadsa is invalid here, so firefox will skip to next property */

Demo

CSS

div {
    background: asadsa, url('http://images.google.co.in/intl/en_ALL/images/logos/images_logo_lg.gif');
                ---^---
  /* Invalid Value For Property background */ 
    height: 200px;
    width: 300px;
    border: 1px solid #f00;
}
share|improve this answer

Firefox doesn't just ignore "that part" of the rule. Firefox ignores the whole rule when it doesn't recognize a part of it.

This means you can specify several rules and Firefox will pick only those that it understands:

body {
  height:100%;
  -webkit-font-smoothing: subpixel-antialiased;
  padding-top: 2%;
  padding-bottom: 2%;
  background: url(http://lorempixel.com/400/200/) repeat;
  background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, right top,
    from(rgba(0,0,0,0.4)), to(rgba(0,0,0,0.4)),
    color-stop(0.03, rgba(0,0,0,0.2)),
    color-stop(0.06, transparent),
    color-stop(0.94, transparent),
    color-stop(0.97, rgba(0,0,0,0.2))),
     url(http://lorempixel.com/400/200/) repeat;
}

fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/yb5AE/

Firefox understands the first background rule, but not the second. Therefore the first one is used. Webkit understands both and therefore the second one overwrites the first one, because it is declared "later", and so the second one is used.

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