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I've inherited some project work from a colleague that has to work on other things, and I've seen a lot of JQuery that seems to do the same thing, but in two different ways, using .append() and .html()

In these examples we assume the target element is empty.

function foo(id, field) {
    $.get('/Project/Foo?id=' + id, function (data) {
        $(field).html(data);
    });
}

And then I see this:

function bar(id, field) {
    $.get('/Project/Bar?id=' + id, function (data) {
        $(field).append(data);
    });
}

Now I understand that .append() will bolt HTML onto the end of a field and .html() replaces the entire field specified, but in it's usage there has been no difference in performance, they are functions that will be called once to display auxiliary information and hide when called elsewhere.

So, in an effort to clean up and make it nice and uniform, I must ask: Are there any performance differences between .append() and .html() ? Are there good reasons why I should choose one over the other?

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closed as too localized by Quentin, Mohammad Adil, Blazemonger, Kevin B, Andrew May 7 '13 at 19:20

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Why don't you run some tests on jsPerf.com and see? – j08691 May 7 '13 at 14:05
2  
They do two completely different things, unless your .append is preceded with .empty or similar. (your copy paste failed) – Kevin B May 7 '13 at 14:05
    
Your code is the same both times. – Colin DeClue May 7 '13 at 14:05
3  
See, those two examples do completely different things. One replaces the content, the other adds to the content. Which one is quicker shouldn't be a consideration in which one you use. One is used for doing X, the other is used for doing Y. – Kevin B May 7 '13 at 14:08
1  
I can't imagine any situation where the speed difference, whatever it is, would make any practical difference. – Juhana May 7 '13 at 14:12
up vote 1 down vote accepted

.append() and .html() do two different things. The first, as the name suggests, appends content, so you can add more content later on if necessary. In case of .html(), it will replace the whole content of the element.

In terms of performance, it also depends. These two examples have similar performance, although append is slightly quicker:

$("body").append($("<div>"));

$("body").html($("<div>"));

For strings as input, html() is comparable or faster.

However, comparing both is pointless because they achieve different goals.

share|improve this answer
    
The one case you tested just so happened to be the one case where .html() actually uses .append, in the other cases ( .append("<div>") and .append("<div><p>foobar</p></div>") ) they are identical in speed. – Kevin B May 7 '13 at 14:24
    
@KevinB: yes, that's my point, your milage will vary depending on what you do, however both functions do different things. – MMM May 7 '13 at 14:25
    
I was more trying to re-enforce your point, jsperf.com/simpleappendhtml/2 – Kevin B May 7 '13 at 14:27

It depends on what you want to do. .append() includes at the end of the element some html and .html() replaces whole html with the content you send to it. Eg:

Using .append()

<div id='content'>
     <p>Some content</p>
</div>
................
$('#content').append('<p>Secondary content</p>');

Result:

<div id='content'>
     <p>Some content</p>
     <p>Secondary content</p>
</div>

Using .html()

<div id='content'>
     <p>Some content</p>
</div>
................
$('#content').append('<p>Secondary content</p>');

Result:

<div id='content'>
     <p>Secondary content</p>
</div>

But if you are going to insert some specific content into an empty element I suggest you to use .html(). It's like using document.getElementById('content').innerHTML = "<p>Secondary content</p>". I think that if you use a method that already does something already made at Javascript language, it could be faster. Instead, .append() its like using document.getElementById('content').innerHTML = document.getElementById('content').innerHTML + "<p>Secondary content</p>".

You can search more information at JQuery documentation about that.

share|improve this answer
    
No, using append() is closer to using Node.appendChild(). – David Thomas May 7 '13 at 14:16
    
@DavidThomas: Not exactly, append() accepts strings – MMM May 7 '13 at 14:20
    
Im not really sure about how it works, thats why I said that if he wants more information that goes to jQuery documentation. I just said that was like that for 2 reasons. First one, because I think it's the most understandable. Secondly, because I dont know how much Javascript level the OP has, so wrote it with the first thing you learn to about going through elements. Anyway, I'd appreciate your suggestion. – DaGLiMiOuX May 7 '13 at 14:20
    
@MMM: hence 'closer' not 'the same as' ;) – David Thomas May 7 '13 at 14:22
    
@DavidThomas: Well now that you've edited your comment... cough – MMM May 7 '13 at 14:22

Though the comparison is debatable; each of them are for their own specific purposes. Still there is a jsperf append vs html report to reveal the fact that append() is slower than html().

Just a bit of background on jsperf; jsperf is de facto to measure the Javascript performance by many JS experts.

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