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I am moving the position (and parents) of a div element using the insertAfter function. Something like this:

$('.annotation i').click(function(){
    $('.annotation').find('.comment').insertAfter('#container');
});

I would like to know if it is possible somehow to store the original parent in order to move the div element back to its original position (under the original parent) after another user action.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
What Blaze meant: $('.yourDiv').hide().clone().appendTo('#container').show().addClass('clone'); Will grab .yourDiv, hide it, clone it, append, show the cloned and add a class to the clone (so you can do $('.yourDiv.clone') later. – RaphaelDDL May 7 '13 at 14:25
    
@RaphaelDDL this element will suffer modifications after being moved. It contains a textarea and therefor I would need to clone it again, remove the original one, and add this one to go back to the original state. Isn't it just more simple to move it again? – Alvaro May 7 '13 at 14:31
1  
You could do $('.yourDiv').replaceWith('.yourDiv.clone').show(); when you need to go back to the first place. (show is because yourDiv was hidden when we cloned). – RaphaelDDL May 7 '13 at 17:25
var parent = $('.annotation').find('.comment').parent();

Will give you the parent of the .comment class' element.

You mention storing the position of it as well. You may find JQuery Index helpful. Either storing the parent's index or storing the particular .comment element's location in a similar fashion for later use.

share|improve this answer

This one stores a reference to the original parent using the .data() function.

$('.annotation i').click(function(){
    $('.annotation').find('.comment').each(function() {
        $(this).data('oparent', $(this).parent());
        $(this).insertAfter('#container');
    });
});

function anotherUserAction(comment) {
    comment.appendTo(comment.data('oparent'));
}
share|improve this answer

You can create a clone of the element and hide the original:

$e = $('element');
$c = $e.clone();
$e.hide();

Then you can either destroy the moved element and show the original again:

$e.show();
$c.remove();

or replace the original with the moved one:

$e.replaceWith($c);

http://api.jquery.com/clone

If the original element has an ID attribute, you'll want to change or remove it on the clone as well so that all elements retain unique IDs:

$c.attr('id','new-unique-string');
// or
$c.removeAttr('id');
share|improve this answer
    
Which is the advantage of cloning instead of moving it if any? – Alvaro May 7 '13 at 14:26
    
You don't have to store the parent at all, because the original element is exactly where you left it. – Blazemonger May 7 '13 at 14:28
    
@Steve you can keep the original one hidden if sometime you need to hide the clone and 'move back' to the original place (a.k.a. "in order to move the div element back to its original position" you said). – RaphaelDDL May 7 '13 at 14:28
    
@Blazemonger this element will suffer modifications after being moved. It contains a textarea and therefor I would need to clone it again, remove the original one, and add this one to go back to the original state. Isn't it just more simple to move it again? – Alvaro May 7 '13 at 14:32
    
If you're modifying the clone, use $e.replaceWith($c); instead. You still benefit from having the original hidden in its original place. – Blazemonger May 7 '13 at 14:32

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