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I have this piece of code:

[...]
var apiURL = "http://.../api.php?format=json";
$.getJSON(apiURL, function(jsonData) {
   $('#tr<?php echo $itemId; ?>').text( $(jsonData)[0].query.pages. + objId  );
});
[...]

Where objId is a javascript variable that can handle different values. How can I make this working? How can I add a variable to this json query?

The json is this one:

{
    "query": {
        "pages": {
            "6": {
                "pageid": 6,
                "ns": 0,
                "title": ".ODk.MTc5",
                "touched": "2013-05-03T10:22:37Z",
                "lastrevid": 26,
                "counter": 0,
                "length": 23,
                "new": "",
                "protection": [{
                        "type": "edit",
                        "level": "sysop",
                        "expiry": "infinity"
                    }
                ]
            }
        }
    }
}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
Why are you passing JSON string to $? –  Dogbert May 7 '13 at 14:54
1  
"How can I make this working?" What exactly is not working? –  Felix Kling May 7 '13 at 14:56
    
just jsonData["query"]["pages"][objId] or jsonData.query.pages[objId] –  shuaqiu May 7 '13 at 15:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's what you need to do:

var apiURL = "http://.../api.php?format=json";
$.getJSON(apiURL, function(jsonData) {
   $('#tr<?php echo $itemId; ?>').text( jsonData.query.pages[objId]  );
});

jsonData is a valid JavaScript object, so you can just access its properties with either dot notation or bracket notation. Bracket notation takes in a string or integer (which is what I assume objId would be) and looks up the property based on that. Dot notation does what you'd expect from any object. There's no reason to try to create a jQuery object out of it first, since that would just not select anything.

share|improve this answer

Simple as it is: Add new items with "push". Access json object and change your values OR delete a by adttribute

var jsonObject = {};
    jsonObject.push("name1":[], "name2":{"value1", "value2"});
    jsonObject.name1 = {"item1":"val1", "item2":"val2"};
    delete jsonObject.name2;

have fun.

It's more like this. I was corrected, thank You again Colin.

var jsonObject = {};
    jsonObject.name1 = {"item1":"val1", "item2":"val2"};
    jsonObject.name2 = {"item3":"val3", "item4":"val4"};
    delete jsonObject.name2;
share|improve this answer
    
What? You can't just declare an object and then push new properties onto it with push. –  Colin DeClue May 7 '13 at 15:36
    
Can You be so kind and explain why not? –  Vadim Costin May 7 '13 at 15:42
    
You just can't. Objects have no method called push. Arrays start with a push, but what you have isn't even valid javascript syntax if objects DID have a method called push. –  Colin DeClue May 7 '13 at 15:47
    
Sorry, My bad... I guess I was tired. Thank you for explanation. I owe you one. –  Vadim Costin May 7 '13 at 17:17

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