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So I have quite a few (over 60000) data points f(x_k) = k, here k=0,1,2,...,N.

Function is monotonically increasing and visually looks pretty smooth. I would love to be able to find fitting F(x) such that for every x_k it so happens that k <= F(x_k) < k+1.

How should I approach this problem?


Data example

x       0     1     3     5     8    10    14    16    20    23    27    29    35    37    41
f(x)    0     1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9    10    11    12    13    14

plot

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You need fitting or interpolating? –  Shai May 7 '13 at 15:00
    
@Shai I am not sure what you mean, sir. AFAIK process of fitting may include interpolation. I am not an English speaker though. –  Pranasas May 7 '13 at 15:03
    
@Shai I rethought what you said. Well I only care about interpolation in a sense that F(x) should also be monotonically increasing. –  Pranasas May 7 '13 at 15:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

(This looks a bit like a lookup table. Maybe an image processing application of some sort? I did some tools in my past life where an unrounding was needed.)

Is this a one time problem, or will you be doing it often, so you have a need for speed?

I'd throw it into SLM. Since I don't have the data, I cannot test it out or give you any results myself, but there is certainly no problem with an assured fit of the quality you wish as long as you use sufficient number of knots. You would need additional knots on the right hand side, as it appears to approach a vertical asymptote, thus a singularity. Splines in general tend not to like singularities, as they are still polynomials at heart.

Better yet, swap the x and y axes to do the fit, thus fitting x = f(y). The left end point is not an asymptote, so there is no longer a singularity. Now all you need do is constrain the result to be monotonic increasing, and concave down (thus everywhere a negative second derivative.) You will require far fewer knots for the inverse fit, but use enough knots that the fit is of adequate quality for your goals.

To use the inverse fit, simply interpolate in the reverse direction, something that SLMEVAL is capable of doing. I'll see how it does on the little bit of test data you have provided (with just the default number of knots):

x = [0 1 3 5 8 10 14 16 20 23 27 29 35 37 41];
y = [0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14];
slm = slmengine(y,x,'plot','on','increasing','on');

enter image description here

So the fit seems reasonable, but I note that your data seems a bit bumpy. It may indeed be difficult to get a solution that is smooth, yet fits entirely within your requirements.

Lets see how well it did:

[x;y;slmeval(x,slm,-1)]'
ans =
         0         0    0.0190
    1.0000    1.0000    0.9656
    3.0000    2.0000    2.0522
    5.0000    3.0000    2.9239
    8.0000    4.0000    4.1096
   10.0000    5.0000    4.8419
   14.0000    6.0000    6.1963
   16.0000    7.0000    6.8331
   20.0000    8.0000    8.0638
   23.0000    9.0000    8.9699
   27.0000   10.0000   10.1459
   29.0000   11.0000   10.7088
   35.0000   12.0000   12.2942
   37.0000   13.0000   12.8285
   41.0000   14.0000       NaN

It misses the last point completely, refusing to extrapolate. But the remainder are not far off. They do fail your requirement though, as it is not true that

k <= F(x_k) < k+1

Of course, I did not build the spline with such a requirement in the specs. Were I to try to solve this problem in general, I might write code that would estimate the values on the curve directly, with no spline intermediary. Then I could easily enforce your constraints, finding the smoothest set of points that satisfies your error bar requirements and monotonicity, that also lies as close to the original data as is possible. Of course, that would involve a large system solve, with 60k unknowns. I don't know how lsqlin would handle that large of a problem, but there are other solvers that might be able to do so if time was an issue.

Again, with your test data as a small scale example:

x = [0 1 3 5 8 10 14 16 20 23 27 29 35 37 41]';
n = numel(x);
k = (0:(n-1))';

% The "unrounding" bound constraints
LB = k;
UB = k+1;

% The best fit possible
Afit = speye(n,n);

% And as smooth as possible
ind = 1:(n-2);
% could do this with diff of course
dx1 = x(ind+1) - x(ind);
dx2 = x(ind+2) - x(ind + 1);

% central second finite difference, for unequal spacing
den = dx1.*dx2.*(dx1 + dx2)/2;
Areg = spdiags([dx2./den,-(dx1 + dx2)./den,dx1./den],[0 1 2],n-2,n);
rhs = [k;zeros(n-2,1)];

% monotonicity constraints...
Amono = spdiags(repmat([1 -1],14,1),[0 1],n-1,n);
bmono = zeros(n-1,1);

% choose a value for r, that allows you to control the smoothness
% larger values of r will make the curve smoother, but the bounds
% will always be enforced. I played with it, and r = 5 seemed a
% reasonable compromise here.
r = 5;
yhat = lsqlin([Afit;r*Areg],rhs,Amono,bmono,[],[],LB,UB);

lsqlin is a bit unhappy, since it does not handle sparse problem of this form at this time. So it throws a warning that it is converting the problem to a full one.

Warning: Large-scale algorithm can handle bound constraints only;
    using medium-scale algorithm instead. 
> In lsqlin at 270 
Warning: This problem formulation not yet available for sparse matrices.
Converting to full to solve. 
> In lsqlin at 320 
Optimization terminated.

Of course, this conversion will be TOTALLY unacceptable for a problem with 60k unknowns. DO NOT TRY IT ON 60k data points!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Your computer will go into a deep freeze.

How did it do though?

disp([x,k,yhat,k+1])
         0         0    0.4356    1.0000
    1.0000    1.0000    1.0000    2.0000
    3.0000    2.0000    2.0504    3.0000
    5.0000    3.0000    3.0000    4.0000
    8.0000    4.0000    4.2026    5.0000
   10.0000    5.0000    5.0000    6.0000
   14.0000    6.0000    6.2739    7.0000
   16.0000    7.0000    7.0000    8.0000
   20.0000    8.0000    8.0916    9.0000
   23.0000    9.0000    9.0000   10.0000
   27.0000   10.0000   10.2497   11.0000
   29.0000   11.0000   11.0000   12.0000
   35.0000   12.0000   12.2994   13.0000
   37.0000   13.0000   13.0000   14.0000
   41.0000   14.0000   14.0594   15.0000

It worked nicely, although it would be a hog of obscene proportions for large problems as you have. Perhaps there is another optimizer (maybe in TOMLAB or some other package) that can handle a large scale sparse linear problem, subject to linear and bound constraints. You also might wish to force the first point through zero, but that is trivial to do.

A final option, is if say 1000 points is doable, to recreate the curve in batches of 1010 at a time using the above scheme. lsqlin should be able to handle problems of that size with no problem. Leave some overlap at the ends, 5 points in each overlap region should be sufficient. Then average the results in the overlap regions.

share|improve this answer
    
It is in fact something like a lookup table related exactly to image processing. And also a one time calculation. This was a (maybe naïve) thought that one could carry a function instead of a hefty array everywhere. –  Pranasas May 7 '13 at 16:39
1  
Sorry, but no, there will surely be NO simple function that will satisfy your constraints. –  user85109 May 7 '13 at 16:44
1  
thanks for sharing your experience woodchips, I'm learning a lot because of you and your tools. –  user2066183 May 7 '13 at 17:40
    
congrats on the well-deserved golden Matlab badge! –  Jonas May 8 '13 at 5:42

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